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A possible Fish or a part of a snake body?


Darko

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Welcome to TFF!

It looks fish to Me.

But a scale and location information may change that opinion.

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I agree with fish from looking at it, but I know nothing (and was not aware of the existence ) Serbian fossils.

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Could this be a hake in the genus Merluccius?

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Fossildude19

Welcome to the Forum. :) 

 

Definitely a nice piece of fish!

Here is what I can make out:

 

WP_20170812_22_08_02_fix.jpg

 

Not bad for your first time there!

Regards,

 

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6 minutes ago, Fossildude19 said:

Welcome to the Forum. :) 

 

Definitely a nice piece of fish!

Here is what I can make out:

 

WP_20170812_22_08_02_fix.jpg

 

Not bad for your first time there!

Regards,

 

Thanksssssss!!!!!!!!!!

1 hour ago, ynot said:

Welcome to TFF!

It looks fish to Me.

But a scale and location information may change that opinion.

i found it in a marl stone mine in Popovac,Serbia.

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1 hour ago, WhodamanHD said:

I agree with fish from looking at it, but I know nothing (and was not aware of the existence ) Serbian fossils.

:D

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1 hour ago, WhodamanHD said:

Could this be a hake in the genus Merluccius?

That's s good question!

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Research on this topic is scarce, and I'm no paleoicthyologist, best I could dig up online was references to otoliths (ear bones) of various fish (goby, flatfish, drum, etc) no refrences to Merluccius ( the reason I suggested it is - I saw a Russian Miocene example that looked similar). I know some are really good at digging up older papers though.

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The middle row looks like vertebral column with the adjacent spines preserved. It looks like fish material. I agree with the others. :)

 

Maybe this document consolidates the geological settings of the region.

 

" The Miocene Serbian Lake System (SLS) represents a series of endemic lakes that were located southeast of the Pannonian Basin in the junction area between the Dinarides and South Carpathians. So far, no independent age constraints are known from the Serbian lakes, and estimates for the age of the lacustrine infill range from 17–14 Ma (e.g. Krstic et al., 2012). New age constraints for the SLS could improve this and allow comparison to similar environments such as the Dinaride Lake System. In this study we used magnetostratigraphy and radioisotopic dating to quantify the age of the ~70 m thick, fine-grained lacustrine series in the Popovac basin (Serbia). One sanidine-bearing tuff provided a very reliable total fusion 39Ar/40Ar age of 14.40 ± 0.01 Ma including all errors using the approach of Kuiper et al. (2008). The paleomagnetic results show a normal polarity pattern with a 2 m-thick reversed interval in its lower part. If we take the Ar/Ar into account, the normal polarity can be corre-lated to Chron C5ADn in the Global Polarity Time Scale (Hilgen et al., 2012). The reversed interval is too short to fit and suggests that part of the magnetic carrier is of secondary origin. At least 12 climate-induced obliquity or precession cycles are interpreted based on alternating dark marl/silt with light-colored limestone patterns and geophysical proxies.
Our new age suggests that the deepest lake phase in Popovac existed around 14.4 Ma (late Langhian), which coincides with a peak of sub-sidence in the south-eastern Pannonian Basin between 15–14 Ma (e.g. Stojadinovic et al., submitted). This is after the Miocene Climatic Optimum, and ~1 Myr later than deposition in most Dinaride Lakes (De Leeuw, 2011). Moreover, the new age suggests that the ‘Badenian’ marine transgression flooded the area only after 14.4 Ma. "

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8 hours ago, abyssunder said:

The middle row looks like vertebral column with the adjacent spines preserved. It looks like fish material. I agree with the others. :)

 

Maybe this document consolidates the geological settings of the region.

 

" The Miocene Serbian Lake System (SLS) represents a series of endemic lakes that were located southeast of the Pannonian Basin in the junction area between the Dinarides and South Carpathians. So far, no independent age constraints are known from the Serbian lakes, and estimates for the age of the lacustrine infill range from 17–14 Ma (e.g. Krstic et al., 2012). New age constraints for the SLS could improve this and allow comparison to similar environments such as the Dinaride Lake System. In this study we used magnetostratigraphy and radioisotopic dating to quantify the age of the ~70 m thick, fine-grained lacustrine series in the Popovac basin (Serbia). One sanidine-bearing tuff provided a very reliable total fusion 39Ar/40Ar age of 14.40 ± 0.01 Ma including all errors using the approach of Kuiper et al. (2008). The paleomagnetic results show a normal polarity pattern with a 2 m-thick reversed interval in its lower part. If we take the Ar/Ar into account, the normal polarity can be corre-lated to Chron C5ADn in the Global Polarity Time Scale (Hilgen et al., 2012). The reversed interval is too short to fit and suggests that part of the magnetic carrier is of secondary origin. At least 12 climate-induced obliquity or precession cycles are interpreted based on alternating dark marl/silt with light-colored limestone patterns and geophysical proxies.
Our new age suggests that the deepest lake phase in Popovac existed around 14.4 Ma (late Langhian), which coincides with a peak of sub-sidence in the south-eastern Pannonian Basin between 15–14 Ma (e.g. Stojadinovic et al., submitted). This is after the Miocene Climatic Optimum, and ~1 Myr later than deposition in most Dinaride Lakes (De Leeuw, 2011). Moreover, the new age suggests that the ‘Badenian’ marine transgression flooded the area only after 14.4 Ma. "

Amazing!

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