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Petrified wood with loose individual fibers.


Drock

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7 minutes ago, Drock said:

I found this specimen in a dry portion of a river bed. Have any of you ever seen a piece of petrified wood that looks like this? I'll add a link to a video proving that it is mineral and not just a piece of wood

Welcome to TFF!

I do not see a piece of petrified wood.

It looks like a crystallized mineral, possibly chrysotile (asbestos).

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30 minutes ago, ynot said:

Welcome to TFF!

I do not see a piece of petrified wood.

It looks like a crystallized mineral, possibly chrysotile (asbestos).

Thanks for the welcome and the reply.

I've considered that it could be asbestos (I'm a certified asbestos worker but have never dealt with it in its raw form) but the "fibers" don't seem right. I freely admit that this might not be petrified wood.

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1 minute ago, Drock said:

Thanks for the welcome and the reply.

I've considered that it could be asbestos (I'm a certified asbestos worker but have never dealt with it in its raw form) but the "fibers" don't seem right. I freely admit that this might not be petrified wood.

There are other fibrous minerals. It really looks like chrysotile to Me. 

But it does not look like petrified wood.

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SailingAlongToo
12 hours ago, ynot said:

There are other fibrous minerals. It really looks like chrysotile to Me. 

But it does not look like petrified wood.

@Drock

I would put it in a plastic bag and take it to one of the Gem or Mineral Clubs in your area, or maybe even a Rock or Mineral Shop, to get their opinion.

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DPS Ammonite

Your fossil wood has growth rings and is not a palm which has only vascular bundles and no growth rings.

 

See part of the third photo that shows two prominant vertical growth rings.

IMG_9698.thumb.jpg.008f124c88158b88a10c3c19673ef8a7.jpg

P1010252 - Copy (1280x960).jpg

 

See my lower photo of palm vascular bundles.

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Nothing in the piece is really reminiscent of botanical affinties

non botanical fibres,an example:

 

hc.jpg

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10 hours ago, DPS Ammonite said:

Your fossil wood has growth rings and is not a palm which has only vascular bundles and no growth rings.

 

See part of the third photo that shows two prominant vertical growth rings.

IMG_9698.thumb.jpg.008f124c88158b88a10c3c19673ef8a7.jpg

P1010252 - Copy (1280x960).jpg

 

See my lower photo of palm vascular bundles.

Was thinking of the fibrous part of a modern palm; not a cross section but get your point. Have seen actual gray colored unaltered wood pockets in very hard silicified wood from our cretaceous here. Dino bone and wood are common finds in many places in AB. Guess if this came from outside the cretaceous outcrop area we could eliminate wood. Guess I should limit my wild guesses!

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Mighty neat piece and I'm still wondering about it.

I've got to go look at a poorly preserved wood specimen I have from the Cretaceous GV sequence in Calif, that as I recall has a bit of a fibrous texture to it. Not as exaggerated as what you have but as I recall somewhat similar. I've also played with a 3" chrysotile vein/chunk years ago and I can see why that might be suggested. The chrysotile experience will no doubt come back to haunt me down the road but that was a very fresh unweathered seam specimen and it had a very different much finer fibrous texture and had a wonderful greenish white cast to it. I imagine it might weather differently and have an entirely appearance so I'll have to look around for some pictures of some worn specimens.  I'm leaning to a wood ID but there are some crazy minerals. I dont recall who our fossil wood experts are...seems like there were some collectors in days gone by and it would be wonderful to hear from them as well. 

 

Got my curiousity! If I can find that specimen and have anything more to add I'll post some pictures. Thanks for showing the photos and the video. 

Regards, Chris 

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MarcusFossils

I've found lots of Chrysotile in Québec, and this does look amazingly similar. I would however suggest that Chrysotile has very fine fibers. I can't determine the diameter of the fibers of this specimen based on the pictures provided, but they would need to be virtually microscopic. 

 

Marc

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Not to hijack a thread, but your piece bears somewhat of a resemblance to a specimen in my possession.  Unknown locale. Dark brown, light feeling (SG for specimen as a whole, 2.0, Mohs between 3 and 4, no reaction to acid. The fibrous structure extends to the surface, which is off-white in color, and grades to tan, then dark brown. I'm assuming this lighter area is the weathering surface. In some places on the surface of the dark fibrous areas, there are tiny round structures , enclosed in a thin lighter colored shell. Cone structures are visible in the white surfaces, along with scattered, iron oxide stained tiny minerals. The dark area has a yellow-brown streak, and the white areas have a white streak.  The fibers are somewhat friable at the edges of the white sections.   I was told by a serious collector of fibrous minerals that in his opinion, this was a piece of petrified wood, as he also had specimens that had a friable fibrous white edge.  

 

To me, my first impression of your specimen is that it is a fibrous mineral and not petrified wood (but that was also my first impression of my specimen pictured below!).DSC_9871.thumb.JPG.585c4d2f9bf38f9a781e537b675a94e7.JPGDSC_9867.thumb.JPG.002dbb3fedf5c70946c50a51a776c43c.JPG

DSC_0003.JPG

DSC_9982.JPG

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