Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi,

I was given this coral as a present and after much googling I can't identify it. All I know is it comes from Stara Planina Mountain in Serbia.

any help would be greatly appreciated :) 

IMG_0964.PNG

IMG_0966.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites
Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe the septal count indicates a scleractinian coral. Best to wait for further confirmation on that even.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not aware that septal count can be used to distinguish scleractinian from tabulate corals.  Of course, septal arrangement is important.  At any rate, the fossil has a strong resemblance to some Devonian tabulate corals, such as Phillipsastrea.

 

Don

Phillipsastrea.jpg

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

From what I know of the geology of the area the limestone formations are of Triassic, Jurassic and lower Cretaceous age if that helps any? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, FossilDAWG said:

I am not aware that septal count can be used to distinguish scleractinian from tabulate corals.

Huh! Hadn't thought of that. They are shorties though aren't they ?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Arizona Chris

It would be very helpful to find out what age strata lies in those mountains - Paleozoic or Mesozoic.

Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Jac said:

From what I know of the geology of the area the limestone formations are of Triassic, Jurassic and lower Cretaceous age if that helps any? 

I missed it too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Septal counts alone cannot determine the order (Rugosa vs. Scleractinia), but the septal symmetry.

The place name "Stara Planina" ("Old Mountain") exists in Bulgaria (Cretaceous; Aptian) and Serbia (Jurassic; Tithonian). Corals are only reported from the first locality, but this has no meaning since the Serbian locality is also a shallow marine facies with Nerineids and corals would not surprise me there.

The coral looks like a Stylina (or related genus of the Stylinidae). A more detailed picture with a scale may give some more information.

 

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps my memory was of a conversation to do with octocorallia ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are a couple of photos for scale. I don't have my good camera so relying on my phone which is awful when it comes to macro :( 

10 hours ago, HansTheLoser said:

Septal counts alone cannot determine the order (Rugosa vs. Scleractinia), but the septal symmetry.

The place name "Stara Planina" ("Old Mountain") exists in Bulgaria (Cretaceous; Aptian) and Serbia (Jurassic; Tithonian). Corals are only reported from the first locality, but this has no meaning since the Serbian locality is also a shallow marine facies with Nerineids and corals would not surprise me there.

The coral looks like a Stylina (or related genus of the Stylinidae). A more detailed picture with a scale may give some more information.

 

Do you have a link to any papers about this area? I'm going to contact the faculty of mining and geology to see if they can provide me with any information before I leave Belgrade on the 24th. 

IMG_1072.JPG

IMG_1076.PNG

Link to post
Share on other sites

@Rockwood

Yes, (extant) octocorals have eight tentacles. The few members that form a calcified skeleton have no real septa (just spiny elongations of trabeculae-like elements) and these spines are mostly in a irregular symmetry. 

 

@Jac

Veselinovic, D. 1965. Titonski Gastropodi Karpato-Balkana i jednog dela unutrasnjih Dinarida. - Acta Geologica, 5: 239-268, 6 pls. Zagreb. - Is the only paper I have but there is surely more. You could also ask at the Natural History Museum in Belgrade. Friendly staff, I was there about four years ago.  I will have a look at the images.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, the small inner calicular diameter is 1.6-1.9 mm, the septal symmetry is - as far as I can see - octameral with 16 septa (but not an octocoral!). It shares this values with Stylina parviramosa  Beauvais, 1964. This is a Jurassic species, but this has no meaning. The species was also found in the very Early Cretaceous.

  • I found this Informative 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...