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Three productids with most of their spines intact, showing that they looked like hedgehogs. I haven't identified them further largely because I can't see the shells properly.

 

(Edit: likely to be Echinoconchus or similar echinoconchid - see below)

 

These are from a Brigantian (Mississippian) mudstone in NE England, Co.Durham.

 

1) About 6cm across

IMG_2730.thumb.jpg.63204f0da1ead82ac2a07ef6b5a99812.jpgIMG_2731.thumb.jpg.9174ea99e3f15d67f6a34f40a91f427b.jpg

 

 

2) Interior brachial valve showing spines projecting around the edge from behind. About 3cm across.

IMG_2732.thumb.jpg.e36bfdb9b8a22f33a9b0a9da77fba4a3.jpgIMG_2734.thumb.jpg.3c80b7c9e6df652e5deb98f4a68a346c.jpg

 

3) about 4cm across:

IMG_2735.thumb.jpg.fe8ea9952a04cfb138d0cf7d8fa61739.jpgIMG_2736.thumb.jpg.1244137a58d0a14ef36e43522933e029.jpg

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How wonderful. I must get some spiny productids. 

And beautiful photographs too.

(ahem) :headscratch:

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Remarkable specimens. Congratulations and thanks for sharing them. 

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I have heard of "bearded clams" before, but this is the first I have seen!

Nice finds.

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These are incredible, Tarquin! 

Very rarely see spines on brachiopods from areas I've collected at. 

Thanks for posting these - a treat to see them. 

 

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Very nice find.... looks to be an Echinoconchus, they are very common in the upper Mississippian in eastern north America.

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outtake grom Gobbett:

bercofimages.jpg

 

Stehli:

 

image.png.6c52485ba6116bb139d1e8f069dfaaa9.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Larval setae(Terebratalia):

Funnily enough, brach setae are like polychaete ones

bercofimages.jpg

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Thanks all for the kind comments!

 

@Archimedes Thanks, Echinoconchus looks very likely -  I also had Pustula as a possibility which may be a synonym if @doushantuo's Gobbett reference is current.

 

Ben, great outtakes, I'll try to find the papers. I guess those stunners in the Grant plate are silicified? 

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Tarq,see the legend to figure one:D

If ayone has either Orrhage(Zoomorph./1973) or Carsten Lueter 's 2000 Anat. Anz. article ,let me know

the ontogeny and histology of brach spines(setae/chaetae) both get a thorough treatment in those

 

 

tarfirstPage-S0022336000027062a.jpg

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31 minutes ago, doushantuo said:

Tarq,see the legend to figure one:D

If ayone has either Orrhage(Zoomorph./1973) or Carsten Lueter 's 2000 Anat. Anz. article ,let me know

the ontogeny and histology of brach spines(setae/chaetae) both get a thorough treatment in those

 

 

tarfirstPage-S0022336000027062a.jpg

 

 

Love the info you provide. But had to especially thank you for the bluebird pictures. My wife and I love bluebirds and love to learn about them! Will have to research this a little more as I had never heard of this.

 

Mike

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Minn,the reason for those in my signature are very plain & simple: i've been reading a lot about the comparative morphology of bird skulls and vertebrate cranial kinesis 

in general,and the more extravagant examples always draw my attention.

Papers on trochilid functional morphology(--->>>"what makes hummingbirds tick") are rare

Edit: From Vellutini et al.,2016

fitarqbracrstPage-S0022336000027062a.jpg

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3 hours ago, minnbuckeye said:

thank you for the bluebird pictures. My wife and I love bluebirds and love to learn about them!

It is a humming bird, not a blue bird.

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Sometimes one types and does NOT look at what one composes. Here is a prime example where proof reading would have caught my mistake. I was out cleaning out my bluebird's houses yesterday and without thinking, wrote bluebird instead of hummingbird. Yes we prefer hummingbirds to bluebirds. Thanks for pointing out the mistake!!!

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A couple more specimens from the same site. 

 

Scale in mm.

IMG_2742.thumb.jpg.deffe7a44b6697d7f1b1b79c011f7577.jpg

 

IMG_2743.thumb.jpg.ccf4203213d7e93a08c97254673e79bc.jpg

 

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Wonderful photos Tarquin, we both have the same specimens so now I know what to call mine. Hope to get back to sorting more of my NE finds over winter.

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11 hours ago, Brittle Star said:

Wonderful photos Tarquin, we both have the same specimens so now I know what to call mine. Hope to get back to sorting more of my NE finds over winter.

 

Thanks, I remember you had some. I look forward to seeing more!

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Thanks for showing us Tarquin some great detail shown on the spiny brachiopods . Very crisp with good contrast, you have a good lens there.  I have never seen this brachiopod before it's really strange but beautiful.

 Also @doushantuo post are very interesting too. 

 

Cheers Bobby 

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Looks like ive got a newfound respect for the lowly brachiopod.  Very cool fossils!

 

RB

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