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ID help on bryozoan from Kansas City Winterset


KCMOfossil

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I collected this specimen earlier today from the Pennsylvanian, Kansas City group, Winterset limestone near Kansas City.  When I split the rock, I was delighted to see the delicate preservation.  Am I correct that this is an internal mold of a fan bryozoan?

 

Russ

 

Here is the right side.

CIMG7059_right_2.thumb.JPG.a9c46cd044ece493d1352b6fc3c71cce.JPG

 

 

Here are both sides.

 

59f8f1e48dd68_CIMG7065rule.thumb.JPG.f2c72c15fc31ca27b55b7a2382eb8cdd.JPG

Here is the left side.

59f8f39bb8d43_CIMG7054left.thumb.JPG.127a8cb80fac8d2600062c93d8b807d7.JPG

 

An here is another view of the right.

CIMG7059_right_2.thumb.JPG.812a87f690220c79ed30f5102d53a4b1.JPG

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I would say it is probably from a Bryzoan like you said. I'm thinking of something in the Stenolaemata class, maybe Septopora. Septopora can be found in the Pennsylvanian Kansas City group. 

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@Missourian

 

It's a beautiful piece, whatever it is. :) 

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Crazy cool preservation. Appears to me to be all casts of the individual zooids and negative spaces.

 

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I agree it's a bryozoan, beautiful detail.

Here's a comparable (though not so cool!) Permian preservation ( Kingopora ehrenbergi, Magnesian Limestone, Durham UK).

 

 

IMG_2342.thumb.jpg.61869b471bb6d9c8142fa877f9dd81be.jpg

 

 

IMG_2340.thumb.jpg.dfcf2767c5f58d8fe2ac02da704c257a.jpg

 

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I agree that it's an internal mold and very nicely preserved. I find those kinds of fossils in the Devonian Mahantango all the time but the preservation is not as nice as in that specimen. :wub:

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55 minutes ago, Shamalama said:

I find those kinds of fossils in the Devonian Mahantango all the time

Interesting.  I have found similar preservation here and there in this tan limestone, and it has always intrigued me.  Until I found this specimen, they were more fragmented, or at least much smaller.  They are quite fragile and hard to photograph with my camera.  I posted some examples a year or so ago on TFF, but I can't find the post now.  As I remember, Missourian identified them as Bryozoan.

 

Russ

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12 hours ago, erose said:

casts of the individual zooids and negative spaces

This is fascinating.  I wouldn't have thought of it.  Thanks.

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13 hours ago, coled18 said:

Septopora can be found in the Pennsylvanian Kansas City group

Thanks.  I have found Septopora before here too, but I only knew it was Septopora because someone on TFF identified it for me.  I do not have a handle on identifying the fan Bryozoans.

 

Russ

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2 hours ago, TqB said:

IMG_2340.thumb.jpg.dfcf2767c5f58d8fe2ac02da704c257a.jpg

 

Thanks, TqB.  This limestone looks very similar to the matrix of my specimen.  There must be some specific kind of preservation going on here that is not limited to a particular strata such as the Winterset here in Kansas City.  Shamalama mentioned finding it in Devonian Mahantango.

 

Russ

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I think the unusual preservation may be due to local dolomitization.

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In the Mahantango they are found in brown siltstone/shale and only as negative molds. The calcite skeletons long ago dissolved away by groundwater.

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That is beautiful! It has such exquisite detail! Thanks for sharing the pictures.

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Thanks to you all for your encouraging and informative comments.  Now I need to figure out a way to preserve this specimen.  It is so fragile it would crumble at a sneeze.  The tiny details cannot be touched at all.  Any suggestions?  I may just put it in my display case and hope for the best.

 

Thanks again for your input.

 

Russ

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I'd maybe run thin (5-10%) paraloid solution on to it.

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On 11/2/2017 at 4:50 AM, TqB said:

I'd maybe run thin (5-10%) paraloid solution on to it.

Thanks, TqB.  I think I will try this.  Perhaps I can put the solution in a mister and lightly spray on some coats.

 

Russ

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here are a few more pictures of this.  Note that the autopores/zooecia are only about .1 mm in diameter and are quite packed together.  The other structures that are between the rows of autopores are fenestrules which are the open spaces evident in fenestrate bryozoans.  Thanks to coled18 for his ID suggestion--Septopora.  

 

Russ

 

5a078c7730a9f_tenzooids2.thumb.jpg.34e7fb28aefeb631569e8f430ee94309.jpg

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