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Druse wood from texas


Vadjosorrus

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Can anyone I.D? Covered in tiny crystals, looks like a thousand camera flashes going off when you walk by it. I found all these the other day. The big sparklee one is 40 lbs

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Very interesting pieces.  I would definitely have picked them up.  From the cross section, me think geologic.

 

Brent Ashcraft

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4 hours ago, ashcraft said:

Very interesting pieces.  I would definitely have picked them up.  From the cross section, me think geologic.

 

Brent Ashcraft

That your final answer?

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Of course it is fossil wood.

This type of preservation is quite abundant in some areas of Hood county in Texas.

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It certainly looks likes petrified wood from the sides, but the first picture, which I am assuming is an end shot, not so much.  As well as the sides are preserved, there should be some evidence of cell structure if it actually was wood.  You might be able to see under magnification (low magnification, like a hand lens) if there are cell like structures.  There are a number of geologic structures that can be mistaken for petrified wood, silcrete being the one I am thinking of.  Some times stromatolites can also look like petrified wood, although I do not think that is what you have.

 

I have not collected in that area, so listen to the locals before you listen to me, but I have been fooled a number of times, and I have collected quite a bit of local cretaceous age petrified wood.

 

Brent Ashcraft

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59 minutes ago, ashcraft said:

It certainly looks likes petrified wood from the sides, but the first picture, which I am assuming is an end shot, not so much.

I believe, what is seen is a plant interior with bundled fibrous elements, that is highly vascular. Perhaps less like oak wood and more like a giant okra stalk. The structures seen in the first image are typical for specimens in my collection from Brilliant Alabama.

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In this area it is called "sugar wood" because of the minute quartz crystals that make it sparkle.

I agree that it is petrified wood.

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As some of the members of the Forum are not familiar with the area and their possibilities regarding to pet wood, I'll be short as I could:

 

Where was the specimens found?

Can we see some resembling pictures, gentlemen?
Has been determined the genus/species of the Paluxy Sand Formation pet woods?

 

I almost think about Araucarioxylon or appropriate, but I'm not familiar with these, so I could be wrong in my thought.

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" Wood showing alternately arranged, multiseriate bordered pitting and araucarioid cross-field pits has been traditionally assigned to Araucarioxylon Kraus in Schimper, although as Bamford and Philippe (2001) have noted, this is a nomen illegitum. The genus Agathoxylon Hartig, which we use here, has been suggested as a valid alternative by Bamford and Philippe (2001), but we note that the nomenclature for this wood type remains mired in debate.
Wood of this type is highly characteristic of all three extant genera (Araucaria, Agathis, and Wollemia) of the conifer family Araucariaceae (Phillips, 1948), and this is the most likely affinity for our specimen. Although Biondi (1980), in his review of the Aptian-Albian woods of Italy, inferred that all described taxa (Araucarioxylon, Protopodocarpoxylon, Protophyllocladoxylon) probably belong to the Protopinaceae, an extinct family of conifers, the specimen we describe here does not show the characteristic pitting of the Protopinaceae (Philippe,1992), and an araucarian affinity is more likely in our view. "

 

excerpt from E. Kustatscher et al. 2013. Early Cretaceous araucarian driftwood from hemipelagic sediments of the Puez area, South Tyrol, Italy. Cretaceous Research 41: 270-276

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Funky-Town, Texas found,  Heavy Blingwood that drifted across the sea from Italy. From a time when, dinosaurs roamed the Earth! Awesome!

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