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Hi all,

 

So I just purchased this nice huge scallop for a killer price. Though not complete, i still love it. 

 

Its from the quarry of Lacoste, in Vaucluse, Southern France. From the Miocene. Well, it was sold to me as Chlamys latissima, but in some of my books it mentions Chlamys gigantea instead. So I was wondering, what species is it? Oh, also, does anyone know more precisely how old the scallop is, and what formation it is from?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

Max

 

AB4F7CBB-0712-438B-A02C-C3D202A2ECA4.jpeg

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4 minutes ago, MeargleSchmeargl said:

I say Chesapecten Jeffersonius. Comparison:

 

 

1200px-Chesapecten_Jeffersonius_Outside.jpg

Doesn’t appear in France ;) Thanks for the help though. Are these your finds? Because those are great scallops!

 

I’m sure that mine is a Chlamys species (unless the species recently got moved to another genus). Just not sure which one.

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I have similar fossil clamys latissima . But it is a guess to your is. Also mine is from France 

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MeargleSchmeargl
Just now, Max-fossils said:

Doesn’t appear in France ;) Thanks for the help though. Are these your finds? Because those are great scallops!

 

I’m sure that mine is a Chlamys species (unless the species recently got moved to another genus). Just not sure which one.

Can Chesapecten be found over there in France? They look strikingly similar. Then again I've only made an educated guess. Not very familiar with France or Bivalves in general.

 

Also, I have a Jeffersonius specimen, but it's not a very good one, unfortunately...

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Genus: Chlamys latissima sp.
Age: Cenozoic Era, Miocene Period; Burdigalian/Aquitanian Stages, around 23 to 15 million years ago  
Origin: Lacoste quarries near Marseilles, Bollene, Vaucluse, south east France, 

 

E1BC69AC-7469-4FC0-B247-01151D642D56.jpeg

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Chesapectens only occur in Eastern United States, there genus range from the Miocene to the Pliocene Chesapecten Nefrens from the Miocene are the type specimens of the Genus Chesapecten named by Ward and Blackwelder in 1975.

Chesapecten Jeffersonius only occur in the Yorktown formation and are the state fossil of Virginia originally called Pecten Jeffersonius.

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Maybe it's a Gigantopecten restitutensis from Lacoste?

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anybody remotely interested in(see below?):

Bongrain has studied Miocene pectinids(particularly the peri-Tethyan ones) for quite a while now 

quggdelptttrymjjpwillist.jpg

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@MeargleSchmeargl @Bobby Rico @Daleksec @Ludwigia @doushantuo

 

Alright, so first of all thanks all for the help. Indeed, Chesapecten is an American genus and can't be found in Europe. But Roger's new suggestion, Gigantopecten restituensis, is a possibility. Now, the good news is that googling "Gigantopecten restituensis", "Chlamys lattissima", or "Chlamys gigantea" delivers similar results, so we can be sure that the three refer to the same shell species and are synonyms. The question is now: what is the accepted species?

 

Well, I did a bit of extra research, and I think that it is Gigantopecten restituensis (Fontannes, 1884). Here is a paper by the same author as that of the paper as doushantuo suggested (by the way, it looks interesting, but I haven't found a place where I could download it for free...). This paper is free though (but  in French):

 http://sciencepress.mnhn.fr/sites/default/files/articles/pdf/g2013n3a5.pdf

The paper talks exactly about the scallop that Bobby and I have (btw Bobby that is a gorgeous one, it's complete too! If I were you I'd update the name), found most commonly in the quarry of Lacoste. And our scallops are from the upper Burdigalian stage (as said in the title of the paper), so are about 16-18 million years old. Shame though that it doesn't mention what the formation is (unless I searched for the wrong word. Although my French is good, my French fossil-vocab is very bad...).

 

Well, I guess the biggest thanks go to Roger for mentioning the correct species name. Wouldn't have been able to find the paper otherwise :) And obviously thanks to everyone else too!

 

Max

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1 minute ago, Bobby Rico said:

Thanks @Max-fossils I will do that. Good work.

:dinothumb:

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1 hour ago, Max-fossils said:

 

Shame though that it doesn't mention what the formation is (unless I searched for the wrong word. Although my French is good, my French fossil-vocab is very bad...).

 

As far as I understand it, the French still don't seem to take Formations as seriously as in other parts of the world, so it doesn't surprise me at all that you haven't been able to find anything.

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Just now, Ludwigia said:

As far as I understand it, the French still don't seem to take Formations as seriously as in other parts of the world, so it doesn't surprise me at all that you haven't been able to find anything.

Ok. A real shame though...

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11 minutes ago, Max-fossils said:

Ok. A real shame though...

"Le Calcaire de Lacoste" is probably the best you can do when it comes to the lithology.

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I discover this subject too late, but I confirm the identification and indications by Ludwigia (Calcaire de Lacoste).

the other publication (Courville et Bongrain) concerns other conditions of deposit and a different region, it would not have contributed correctly to the subject ( but it seems interesting and appropriate for the Touraine faluns, thank you Doushantuo)

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Some more pictures :

http://geologie.mnhn.fr/pecten.html

http://www.geoforum.fr/topic/27458-preparation-dun-bloc-de-pecten-du-vaucluse/

http://www.vonloga.net/fossilien/lacoste4.htm

 

(on auction sites, you can find very high-priced slabs with dozens of Gigantopecten….[often labelled Pecten])

the old quarry is now closed, turned into an artistic site.

 On this video (link below) you can see the village, modern and ancient quarries, …

https://france3-regions.francetvinfo.fr/provence-alpes-cote-d-azur/emissions/chroniques-mediterraneennes/revoir-l-emission-luberon-pierre-de-lumiere-decouverte-diffusee-le-samedi-10-mai.html

the medieval village of Lacoste (Vaucluse) has hosted since 2002 a very famous American university campus, the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD), one of the best art schools in the United States.

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On 6-1-2018 at 8:54 PM, marguy said:

Some more pictures :

http://geologie.mnhn.fr/pecten.html

http://www.geoforum.fr/topic/27458-preparation-dun-bloc-de-pecten-du-vaucluse/

http://www.vonloga.net/fossilien/lacoste4.htm

 

(on auction sites, you can find very high-priced slabs with dozens of Gigantopecten….[often labelled Pecten])

the old quarry is now closed, turned into an artistic site.

 On this video (link below) you can see the village, modern and ancient quarries, …

https://france3-regions.francetvinfo.fr/provence-alpes-cote-d-azur/emissions/chroniques-mediterraneennes/revoir-l-emission-luberon-pierre-de-lumiere-decouverte-diffusee-le-samedi-10-mai.html

the medieval village of Lacoste (Vaucluse) has hosted since 2002 a very famous American university campus, the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD), one of the best art schools in the United States.

Des chouettes liens, merci :)

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