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Cretaceous Horn Coral, Cen Tex


thair

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I recently found these horn corals in a road cut near Gatesville TX. I am not as familiar with Cretaceous stuff so thought yall could help me ID.

Thanks

1-8-18IMG_1219.jpg

1-8-18IMG_1220.jpg

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No horn corals in the Cretaceous my friend*, either the date is wrong or they are Scleractinians.

Edit: * except for maybe Thailand for some odd reason

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That's why I ask, they looked like horn coral

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5 minutes ago, thair said:

That's why I ask, they looked like horn coral

They do, is it possible that your site could be older?

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I am going to check my maps when I get home as to formation but I am almost sure. But that means not sure. Ha Ha. I do not have my documentation with me here at work. Thanks

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Considering the general shape, which looks like a horn, it can be considered a "horn coral", although the difference between the Paleozoic and Mesozoic - onward solitary corals is clearly visible in the septal plans.

 

corals.thumb.jpg.3b150b795dabc371e5b7487dd4eca813.jpg

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The nice preservation makes me think they might be small rudists (calcite) instread of scleractinian coral (aragonite). Aragonite isn’t very stable and is usually pretty crumbly when found in sediment as old as the Cretaceous unless found in dense clays.

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Checked map and definitely lower Cretaceous. I may need to polish one end of one of them so septa pattern revealed. Thanks for info

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@

abyssunder

Correct. But to see what you posted, people should cut their material, but they never do.

 

@ All

Without cuting or polishing it is only rarely possible to say something about the taxonomy of corals.

The above presented material could be anything.

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14 hours ago, HansTheLoser said:

Correct. But to see what you posted, people should cut their material, but they never do.

Apical end upper left, ready to go. The septal insertion pattern, if present, should be visible.

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