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I found a bunch of fossilized seashells on the Oregon coast, and I found this nut in the sea wall. I'm fairly sure its hollow and fossilized. What is it and how old? Any ideas?

20180428_165505.jpg

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DPS Ammonite

Welcome to The Fossil Forum.

 

Did you find the it embedding in rock or was it loose? How hard is it. Try scratching it with a steel knifeblade and let us know what the results are.

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I’m a little skeptical it is a fossil, but I’ve been skeptical and wrong many times. Can we have an approximate location, perhaps a town it was near? This can help determine the age of the rocks and if it is possible to be a fossil.

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Looks like a beech tree nut to Me, common trees in the pacific northwest.

I doubt it is a fossil.

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It was buried in the wall, in clay, at Beverly Beach. It feels like stone.

 

Here are some others:

20180428_165305.jpg

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I have a feeling such a seed would be carbonized if it was a fossil, this is the case for any plant material I find in contemporary and similar formations. Here’s the description of the geology of your beach:

930F354A-B989-458E-B91F-F8244F42DFA6.jpeg

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The shell of a beech nut is a very dense wood and is hard to scratch.

I still think it is a beech tree nut, but pictures from all sides without fingers may change My opinion.

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1 hour ago, WhodamanHD said:

I have a feeling such a seed would be carbonized if it was a fossil, this is the case for any plant material I find in contemporary and similar formations. Here’s the description of the geology of your beach:

930F354A-B989-458E-B91F-F8244F42DFA6.jpeg

Thank you for this, for the other fossils!

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1 hour ago, Malone said:

Will it float in water?

Good call Malone!

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4 hours ago, MelodyAnne said:

Here are some others:

20180428_165305.jpg

Nice gastropod.

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Tidgy's Dad
9 hours ago, Malone said:

Will it float in water?

Well done! Spot on, Malone! :)

And MelodyAnne, that's a nice gastropod and a very warm welcome to TFF from Morocco!:)

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I'm just going to throw this out as a point of information and not as an opinion one way or another on the specimen in question.  Some very  old plant remains can remain unlithified and when dry would float.  I am currently working with a 5 million year-old deposit that has a variety of nuts including hickory and hazelnut.  These are contemporaneous with Teleoceras, borophagidae, camellids, etc.  These nuts and associated wood are not lithified and remain organic and float when dry.  Just throwing this out there so that potential fossils don't get tossed.  Context is key.

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Oh! So, knowing I plucked it from the same layer where I got the gastropod and the stone clamshells is good, right? Is there any use for the nut? Could I call a University and offer it for them to fiddle with? I once did that with a meteorite.

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Max-fossils
4 minutes ago, MelodyAnne said:

Could I call a University and offer it for them to fiddle with?

That's always a smart thing to do :) 

 

This is a completely wild guess, but I'm gonna say that the gastropod is of the Buccinum genus. I don't know what species though. It's definitely from the Buccinidae (true whelks) family. 

 

Oh, and also, welcome to TFF!

 

Best regards,

 

Max

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36 minutes ago, MelodyAnne said:

Oh! So, knowing I plucked it from the same layer where I got the gastropod and the stone clamshells is good, right? Is there any use for the nut? Could I call a University and offer it for them to fiddle with? I once did that with a meteorite.

You might wish to contact Dr. Bruce Tiffney at UCalSB.  Here is his website and contact info.

 

Bruce Tiffney

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MelodyAnne

Thank you! I emailed him.

 

Here's another fossil I found:

 

 

20180503_182158-1448x1376.jpg

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By the way I wasn't suggesting that was a definitive way of telling whether it was or was not a fossil. They have found soft tissue in fossils. It's only a indicator of per mineralization. It would be a fantastic find!

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Actually it probably could even float per mineralized if the water displacement was enough and it's a fantastic find anyway! I found this on the internet. It's an article saying a viable seed though. I don't know the difference between a viable seed and one that is not fossilized.

IMG_5325.PNG

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Peat Burns
3 hours ago, MelodyAnne said:

Thank you! I emailed him.

Let us know what he says :)

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