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The Amateur Paleontologist

Hey everyone,

 

I recently came back from a trip to England. Most of the time was spent in museums, especially London's Natural History Museum. Over there, I met the Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology (Tim Ewin), who showed me around some parts of the Echinoderm Collections. Basically, the goal of this visit was to examine some of the echinoderms from the British Chalk, for some comparative research material for my MKFRP project. Some of the stuff in those collections is absolutely amazing :) - and the amount of material in there is really extensive. 

This thread will show some of the chalk echinoderm material that I saw over there.

Hope you guys'll like this!

 

2 very well articulated Tylocidaris clavigera in a single nodule of chalk

5b3509af22ae5_ScreenShot2018-06-28at18_14_46.png.97979145a7d418bdc94a70147f721b8e.pngg on

 

Drawer filled with "tylocidarine" regular echinoids. The pink colouring on some of the specimens is due to the fact that some of them needed to have the fine details rendered sharper (this was before the age of digital photography)

5b350ce97c5e1_ScreenShot2018-06-28at18_28_49.thumb.png.181cbf05baa0a2b289958cb60efef087.png

 

Partial Tylocidaris clavigera associated with a disarticulated goniasterid (Asteroidea, Goniasteridae) starfish

5b350e14e0ac2_ScreenShot2018-06-28at18_30_39.png.bb5c829f21a2b9e16404c949ee8579ad.png

 

Very well preserved and nearly complete Nymphaster marginatus goniasterid

5b350fbb8b540_ScreenShot2018-06-28at18_39_12.png.3129306f831a92b4971aca561ab7ab9d.png

 

Neat little example of the goniasterid Metopaster

5b35113a41806_ScreenShot2018-06-28at18_46_22.png.696a1a468ee505b5ef1683f53524832e.png

 

Calyx and partial arm of the free-floating crinoid Marsupites testudinarius (sorry for not very good photo quality :( )

 5b351cdb798b8_ScreenShot2018-06-28at19_34_44.png.80e4735986e91f5a8b7cf7bfa94c2478.png

 

Articulated columnals of an isocrinid crinoid (possibly Isocrinus); this is specifically relevant to my MKFRP project given the age of that fossil (Early Maastrichtian)

5b35148f27b39_ScreenShot2018-06-28at18_59_02.png.d46d619e3c3e4dafb86645b99bcfd813.png

 

To finish things off… It's not very "chalk-y", but it's definitely special - a Palaeocoma milleri ophiuroid from the Early Jurassic of Lyme Regis, collected by Mary Anning

 5b3516ac64c78_ScreenShot2018-06-28at19_06_24.png.5cb62bacf207167ffeeb8255063d6e9a.png

 

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I like this. Great opportunity for you, especially meeting up with the

12 minutes ago, The Amateur Paleontologist said:

Curator of Invertebrate Paleontology (Tim Ewin)

:)

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The Amateur Paleontologist

@Innocentx Yeah, he's a nice guy :) Great to talk with, and he definitely knows his "echinoderm-ology"!

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Impressive echinoderms!  Thanks for sharing!

 

-Joe

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Always enjoy seeing the behind the scene collections.  Thank you for sharing must have been a very good experience for you.

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sixgill pete

Wow, very impressive stuff. Thanks for sharing it with us. What a great experience for you.

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20180628_204238.png

And she probably sold something like this for a 1/2 Farthing at that time too!

 

If we could just jump into the "Wayback Machine" with a pocket full of cash. Or better yet, assist her on the hunts.

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The Amateur Paleontologist

Glad you guys liked it - it was really fun and informative :) 

 

@caldigger I agree, though I'd probably go for assisting her on her hunts. I mean, can you imagine? Fossil hunting with Mary Anning...

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Wrangellian

Thanks for the tour.

What is that pink stuff and is it not removable? I suppose not, otherwise they would have done it. I wonder why they didn't use the sublimated ammonium chloride method (which evaporated off the fossil soon after it is photographed) - I believe they had that technique before digital photography, but I could be wrong (maybe not way back?)...

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The Amateur Paleontologist

@Wrangellian The pink stuff is indeed unremovable, those who were working on the specimens chose for some unknown reason to not use something removal. It was indeed before digital photography, since a white specimen on a white rock would have been difficult to photograph. Hence the pink stuff, to bring out certain fine details of the specimen. 

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Wrangellian

So the white stuff was not used before digital photography? I would have thought it was an old technique, specifically to make fossils stand out in photos (film or otherwise), especially for print publications. Our local go-to fossil guide here, West Coast Fossils (pub. 1997/8, with b+w photos printed on non-glossy paper) relied heavily on the ammonium chloride technique for its fossil photography.

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  • 1 month later...
Brittle Star

Lovely specimens, have met up with Tim a few times over the last 10yrs, had a few peeks of stuff, it's a maze behind the scenes.

 

 

 

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The Amateur Paleontologist
58 minutes ago, Brittle Star said:

Lovely specimens, have met up with Tim a few times over the last 10yrs, had a few peeks of stuff, it's a maze behind the scenes.

 

 

 

Absolutely agree.. I'd get lost had I been without Tim - not that I'd actually mind getting lost in there ;)

-Christian

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