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Cretaceous fossils from Alabama


ALABAMAHEADHUNTER

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ALABAMAHEADHUNTER

These are some of the fossils I found a couple of weeks back . Wonder if anyone knows what the last tooth is ?

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In your first picture, second row, fourth from the left, there is a tooth with an upwards curvature (not sure how to describe it). I have something that looks just like that, embedded in a rock. I have tried to get decent pics of mine multiple times, but they always turn out too blurry to post. Which type of tooth is that one? How big is it? 

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43 minutes ago, BLT said:

In your first picture, second row, fourth from the left, there is a tooth with an upwards curvature (not sure how to describe it). I have something that looks just like that, embedded in a rock. I have tried to get decent pics of mine multiple times, but they always turn out too blurry to post. Which type of tooth is that one? How big is it? 

Hi Can take your photos outside in good light. Also don’t hold the tooth place it on a flat surface. Multiple angles of the tooth if possible will help with an ID .  It is alway better to get a ID from the forum with the use of a image  . I understand it is hard to get great photos of fossils but I do feel it is a matter of practice . My photos have improved s lot since I joined the forum just over a year. All the best Bobby 

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5 hours ago, Bobby Rico said:

Hi Can take your photos outside in good light. Also don’t hold the tooth place it on a flat surface. Multiple angles of the tooth if possible will help with an ID .  It is alway better to get a ID from the forum with the use of a image  . I understand it is hard to get great photos of fossils but I do feel it is a matter of practice . My photos have improved s lot since I joined the forum just over a year. All the best Bobby 

Thanks for the advice! :) The tooth I was referring to is still embedded in a rock. (At least I’m assuming it’s a tooth.) The rock itself has an interesting shape, possibly due to weathering. I did take the pictures outdoors. I’ve literally taken hundreds of pictures of this one tooth. :blink: Generally speaking, I do not have much of an interest in fossilized iteeth. I do like to have every fossil I find identified though, just out of curiosity. :wacko: Btw, I do not remember whether or not I’ve previously mentioned that it was actually either a post or comment of yours from a while back which made me decide to buy a macro lens for my iPhone. I love your closeup photos! However, I guess the macro lens I have isn’t as nice as yours (it was very inexpensive) and doesn’t take such clear pictures. Although, I do suppose that could be due to user error. Lol. ;) 

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25 minutes ago, BLT said:

it was very inexpensive

Yeah mine was about  $16 or £12. So cheep too. I have practice it quite a bit , you need to hold the phone incredible still. I work at a table and sit very still and you need good light. I am really glad you like my photography I am enjoying it too. My favourite things to photograph are hash plates. 

 

 

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Nice teeth especially the Ptychodus. 

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ALABAMAHEADHUNTER
On 10/13/2018 at 9:14 AM, BLT said:

In your first picture, second row, fourth from the left, there is a tooth with an upwards curvature (not sure how to describe it). I have something that looks just like that, embedded in a rock. I have tried to get decent pics of mine multiple times, but they always turn out too blurry to post. Which type of tooth is that one? How big is it? 

I can't think of the scientific name but we have always called them Sand sharks . The picture is kind of deceiving . It is actually one of the more common teeth we find but almost all of them have one or both roots broken off of them .

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6 hours ago, ALABAMAHEADHUNTER said:

I can't think of the scientific name but we have always called them Sand sharks . The picture is kind of deceiving . It is actually one of the more common teeth we find but almost all of them have one or both roots broken off of them .

Gotcha, thanks! :) 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 10/14/2018 at 9:31 PM, ALABAMAHEADHUNTER said:

I can't think of the scientific name but we have always called them Sand sharks . The picture is kind of deceiving . It is actually one of the more common teeth we find but almost all of them have one or both roots broken off of them .

Looks like a Goblin shark (Scapanorhynchus texanas).

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