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ALABAMAHEADHUNTER

  These are a few other fossis I have found in the past .I have collected fossils here for nearly 40 years but most of them have been given away or donated to a local museum here in Birmingham . The sharks teeth are Cretaceous form the Mooresville chalk formation . The Echinoid was found at St.Stephens Quarry years ago in the Yazoo Clay . The little Trilobite came from a site near Russelville in the Tuscumbia Formation . I have found fossils all over , these are the ones that are most convenient to photograph at this time .

  The arrowhead was found in a creek while collecting fossils .

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Very nice !!  That's an impressive pile of Ptychodus, and I also really like the echinoid.

 

Don

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Those are very nice Ptycodus teeth. I’m not so much into shark teeth, but they are growing on me. I found 30 teeth on Friday in Maryland. If there is one shark tooth I have want to find it is a Ptycodus. Of course I wouldn’t have any complaints if I found a Meg tooth.

The pattern, detail and coloration on yours are exquisite. I think the 3 big ones in the next to last pic may be the prettiest I have ever seen.

Thanks for sharing.

 

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All nice teeth, especially the Ptychodus mortoni! In the Kamp Ranch member of the Arcadia Park Formation in North Texas, that species can get to be around 2 inches, real “muffin” teeth. 

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ALABAMAHEADHUNTER
On 10/9/2018 at 9:12 PM, Darktooth said:

Nice collection! 

The teeth were from one day collecting . That is an average day in the creek we hunt .

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ALABAMAHEADHUNTER
On 10/9/2018 at 9:16 PM, FossilDAWG said:

Very nice !!  That's an impressive pile of Ptychodus, and I also really like the echinoid.

 

Don

We have found as many as 40 ptychodus teeth in a day . The site where I found the echinoid is now underwater . There is a creek in Montgomery Alabama , Catoma Creek . There is a water fall that is formed by millions of quarter sized echinoids , really neat to see .

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ALABAMAHEADHUNTER
On 10/9/2018 at 9:24 PM, KimTexan said:

Those are very nice Ptycodus teeth. I’m not so much into shark teeth, but they are growing on me. I found 30 teeth on Friday in Maryland. If there is one shark tooth I have want to find it is a Ptycodus. Of course I wouldn’t have any complaints if I found a Meg tooth.

The pattern, detail and coloration on yours are exquisite. I think the 3 big ones in the next to last pic may be the prettiest I have ever seen.

Thanks for sharing.

 

There are some places in North Texas where you can find Ptychodus  teeth .

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ALABAMAHEADHUNTER
On 10/9/2018 at 9:34 PM, Heteromorph said:

All nice teeth, especially the Ptychodus mortoni! In the Kamp Ranch member of the Arcadia Park Formation in North Texas, that species can get to be around 2 inches, real “muffin” teeth. 

One of my friends found one about 2 inches wide last year . We have found as many as 40+ in a day at this site .

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Nice finds! Looks like You got a good spot for hunting.

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These are some nice finds! Love the Mississippian trilobite. Don't see many of those at all. I would never have expected to see one from the Tuscumbia Formation. The equilavents in TN (St. Louis and Warsaw limestones) are about the last rocks I would look at for trilobites. Maybe I need to take a closer look! :trilosurprise:

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ALABAMAHEADHUNTER
10 hours ago, Paciphacops said:

These are some nice finds! Love the Mississippian trilobite. Don't see many of those at all. I would never have expected to see one from the Tuscumbia Formation. The equilavents in TN (St. Louis and Warsaw limestones) are about the last rocks I would look at for trilobites. Maybe I need to take a closer look! :trilosurprise:

 This particular site has produced many over the years . Nearly all of them will be rolled up . There are some any fossils at this site , I will walk and look for a while . Then when I get serious I lay down on my belly and look very closely at every little thing on the ground . That's when I find the trilobites . 

  We also do this at a couple of Cretaceous sites and have found small beautifully preserved bird bones . I have always given them to a local museum .

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Awesome and beautiful finds. Thanks for sharing. Love the ptychodus teeth. Something we don’t see here in nj.  

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  • 4 weeks later...

Wow! Those P. mortoni are amazing. I only have a handful of good ones in my collection and yours are exquisite! 

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Looks like you are all stocked up and ready to send for your Secret Santa package. :dinothumb:

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The Amateur Paleontologist

I know I'm a bit late, but.. neat collection :) I like the shark teeth!

-Christian

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The echinoid is Conolampas aldrichi Twitchell, 1915.  It is not from the Yazoo but from the Upper Oligocene Chickasawhay Limestone which is also exposed at St. Stephens.

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Thanks for posting these. 

Great to see other states' offerings of fossils. :) 

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23 minutes ago, MikeR said:

The echinoid is Conolampas aldrichi Twitchell, 1915.  It is not from the Yazoo but from the Upper Oligocene Chickasawhay Limestone which is also exposed at St. Stephens.

Is this a recent change from Echinolampas aldrichi to Conolampas aldrichi?

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23 hours ago, Al Dente said:

Is this a recent change from Echinolampas aldrichi to Conolampas aldrichi?

According to my database it is called Conolampas in C. Wyeth Cooke's 1959 USGS professional paper on Eastern Cenozoic Echinoids, however it is called Echinolampas by Harper and Shaak (1974) in their abstract on Echinolampas tanypetalis.  I'll have to do some internet research to find out which is considered valid.

 

Mike

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3 hours ago, MikeR said:

According to my database it is called Conolampas in C. Wyeth Cooke's 1959 USGS professional paper on Eastern Cenozoic Echinoids, however it is called Echinolampas by Harper and Shaak (1974) in their abstract on Echinolampas tanypetalis.  I'll have to do some internet research to find out which is considered valid.

 

Mike

Hi Eric

 

I do not know where I got Conolampas from.  Both Twitchell and Cooke list it as Echinolampas .  Although Conolampas is valid, it has a much higher test.  Time for a label change.

 

Mike

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22 minutes ago, MikeR said:

Hi Eric

 

I do not know where I got Conolampas from.  Both Twitchell and Cooke list it as Echinolampas .  Although Conolampas is valid, it has a much higher test.  Time for a label change.

 

Mike

Mike-

Thanks for looking into this. E. aldrichi are found in the Oligocene of NC too. I've never found one, they are found in renourished beach deposits in Camp Lejeune. 

 

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