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Pelee Island fossils


BuddingPaleo

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Hey guys. I've been extremely ill, and missing my fossils. Staying with my mom for a while, she pulled out a box of fossils she found on the shore at Pelee Island, Canada on Lake Erie. It's near Cedar Point, and Port Clinton Ohio. 

Some I was able to identify for her, but I don't know these. I'm pretty sure one is just suggestive stone, and not a worn tooth, but I'll ask that one too for verification. 

First one looks like a cephalopod to me, but I am not familiar with this area's fossils. 

The second one is a vertebrae from something. 

The third is the one I'm pretty sure is just rock, but double checking.

The last one, I just don't have a clue. More pictures coming in reply.

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Welcome back.  :) 

 

1 Crinoid stem - water worn

2  Crinoid columnal

3 Rock

4 cemented rugose corals

5 Solitary rugose coral. 

 

Hope you are feeling better now. 

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Thanks :) Trying to recover, going to be a long road. Moving for care to NW Ohio. I hate to leave my fossil bed. I'm sure I'll find a hunting ground there! 

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I agree with Tim"s ids.

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2 minutes ago, BuddingPaleo said:

Thanks guys! Any idea what the vert is from?

If you are talking about the 3rd picture, it is a crinoid stem columnal, with spikes or cirri attached. 

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2 minutes ago, BuddingPaleo said:

Thanks guys! Any idea what the vert is from?

There are no vert in this selection of pieces.

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Gotcha, I don't find crinoid so completely clueless there. I'm super excited for her, and for me because she gifted them to me. :D so all crinoid. Awesome sauce! Thanks!

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Cool fossils, glad they have a new owner. :)

Here is a picture of a crinoid stem section that looks similar to yours.

 

image.png.1e50d7cbe7f76815b860e1abd7bc6503.png

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6 hours ago, BuddingPaleo said:

Gotcha, I don't find crinoid so completely clueless there. I'm super excited for her, and for me because she gifted them to me. :D so all crinoid. Awesome sauce! Thanks!

Tim said the last 2 were rugose coral.

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2 hours ago, Bronzviking said:

Here is a picture of a crinoid stem section that looks similar to yours.

... similar ones :)

 

img53.thumb.jpg.58eef8189bd35ad81b509ed5aca5bd2c.jpg20181027_110249.jpg.181db564072e8d505cf1a64e4eb61469.jpg.144c43d5a6740fb7988975e4b0f6a4d7.jpg

 

" Other species of Dolatocrinus in which characteristics of the stem are known (e.g., D. grandis MILLER & GURLEY) exhibit the 3-fold flanges with tendency to vertical elongation across part or all of internodal groups of columnals. Such stems seem to be reliably assignable to Dolatocrinus."

 

" DOLATOCRINUS EXCULPTUS Moore & Jeffords, new species
Stem with internodes composed of more than 6 columnals (estimated 12) which are only slightly lower in height than nodals, latter distinguished by sharp-crested keel at mid-height crossed at 120-degree angles by narrow vertical flanges that have triangular profile next to nodal and low extensions across internodes, sides of internodals with gently convex longitudinal profiles, smooth; articular facets showing large circular lumen and crenularium marked by moderately fine, straight crenulae, which are divided into 3 groups by V-shaped junctions of crenulae opposite the vertical flange. "

 

" DOLATOCRINUS AVIS Moore & Jeffords, new species
Nodals similar to those of Dolatocrinus exculptus in having 3 prominent vertically compressed outward extensions at angles of 120 degrees but these are spinelike
instead of developed as flanges; also articular facet is materially smaller in diameter than columnal and depressed, except for peripherally visible crenulae, its features obscured by weathering. "

 

excerpts from R. C. Moore & R. M. Jeffords. 1968. Classification and nomenclature of fossil crinoids based on studies of dissociated parts of their columns. Univ. Kansas Paleontol. Contrib. Serial number 46, Echinodermata, Article 9: 1-114

 

Edited by abyssunder
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