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Central Florida found in roadbed construction limestone


Smmessineo

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Hello!

I live in Ocala. Whenever my community starts constructing a new neighborhood, I go and search through the piles of limestone that they bring in to make the roadbed. It usually is different than the “local” softer chalkier limestone that is prevalent right here. 

This batch has a lot of beautiful brown and blue chert, the usual Florida fossils , some coated in druzy crystals (?) . There have been a few that I found last weekend that I cannot definitely identify. I appreciate any help, and any info on what area this limestone might be from. 

There are 3 photos here plus 2 more in the first reply.

Thanks!

Margaret 

F518B2B1-A0C0-4936-A08A-7AA0C1B3C878.jpeg

B1B02BD3-ADC5-4790-BE70-1770D082AF79.jpeg

6C3D8690-6344-455F-AD5D-3CDCBC5BCDEE.jpeg

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4 hours ago, Smmessineo said:

More specimens.

96E36AB0-8D9C-466A-ADF6-68BE6275E11D.jpeg

C31D5C12-6470-4A42-BA20-F1DA08BD9B45.jpeg

I see two bivalve external molds (or imprints) and one bivalve internal mold (lower right) in the top photo.

Bottom photo looks like a druzy crystal pocket in chert.

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Oxytropidoceras

Bronzviking wrote:

 

"I see two bivalve external molds (or imprints)..."

 

The larger external mold has a natural cast of an animal boring associated with it.

 

To se how it formed, look at Figure 43 on page 70 of:

 

Taylor, P.D. and Wilson, M.A., 2003. Palaeoecology and evolution of marine

hard substrate communities. Earth-Science Reviews, 62(1-2), pp.1-103.

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Paul_Taylor5/research

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/200558032_Palaeoecology_and_evolution_of_marine_hard_substrate_communities

 

Yours,

 

Paul H.

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Interesting finds. First one might be an invertebrate burrow. Can we see the other side and an end view? I have a few that have similar parallel grooves/markings that apparently are casts created when the clam burrowed into wood and the boring was infilled with sediment and was solidified.

 

The 2nd/3rd photos appear to be a bone fragment. Hard to see in the photo, but it may show some layering/concentric rings in the end view and that might suggest a dugong fragment--they are fairly common in some areas. Here's a pic of a rib showing that layering from the Univ of Florida Nat History Museum collections. 

https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/files/3714/2203/7143/Metaxytherium-floridanum-2.jpg

 

Regards, Chris  

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I think, there is a trace which might be consistent with Entobia.

 

96E36AB0-8D9C-466A-ADF6-68BE6275E11D.jpeg.e194199f6a6d639153f9e6271fcbc34c.thumb.jpg.3989adbed27913d04070019a9957b092.jpg1-s2.0-S0012825216302380-gr72.jpg.00d2339abc4271ca204dd6e4e6ed9d70.jpg

comparative picture from here

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On 11/22/2018 at 11:31 PM, Plantguy said:

Interesting finds. First one might be an invertebrate burrow. Can we see the other side and an end view? I have a few that have similar parallel grooves/markings that apparently are casts created when the clam burrowed into wood and the boring was infilled with sediment and was solidified.

 

The 2nd/3rd photos appear to be a bone fragment. Hard to see in the photo, but it may show some layering/concentric rings in the end view and that might suggest a dugong fragment--they are fairly common in some areas. Here's a pic of a rib showing that layering from the Univ of Florida Nat History Museum collections. 

https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/files/3714/2203/7143/Metaxytherium-floridanum-2.jpg

 

Regards, Chris  

I have to respectfully disagree. I see nothing diagnostic for bone in any of the pictures. Marine shell molds, borings and infilled traces all seem more correct for the various fossils pictured.

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13 hours ago, abyssunder said:

I think, there is a trace which might be consistent with Entobia.

 

96E36AB0-8D9C-466A-ADF6-68BE6275E11D.jpeg.e194199f6a6d639153f9e6271fcbc34c.thumb.jpg.3989adbed27913d04070019a9957b092.jpg1-s2.0-S0012825216302380-gr72.jpg.00d2339abc4271ca204dd6e4e6ed9d70.jpg

comparative picture from here

Yep its pretty cool!

Regards, Chris 

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50 minutes ago, Scylla said:

I have to respectfully disagree. I see nothing diagnostic for bone in any of the pictures. Marine shell molds, borings and infilled traces all seem more correct for the various fossils pictured.

I'm good with that and I can see why you can say it might be an infilled trace for the tubular shaped item. That does make sense and I considered that initially, but Margaret's appears to have small holes/borings? and similar rough textures like some of my bone examples. I'll see if I can get a couple photos later for comparison. May need some sharper images from Margaret.

 

I could be all wet but I throw it out as a possibility...we get alot of burrows/bone/borings and other marine/terrestrial vertebrate material mixed together naturally and reworked. 

 

Regards, Chris  

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Here are the pics of the bone I promised earlier...it has an almost granular/sugary texture on the length of one side and a conchoidal like fracture/cherty look to it on the end and a very vague pore structure. Looks a little bit more grainy/boney on the opposite length/side. Hoping Margaret can confirm it is a piece of bone or another trace/brurrow. 

5bfcb3f7ea567_Panoramaboneimagesrevised.thumb.jpg.6a64c982cf95f778c15d93300bba9080.jpg

@Scylla

Regards, Chris 

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