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Need help identifying the following fossil. Found this fragment in the limestone in the locality Theokafta of the Argolis Peninsula, near the Ancient Theatre of Epidaurus (Greece, eastern Peloponnesus). The limestone contains condensed ammonoid beds of the Hallstatt facies (Triassic: Anisian–Ladinian). The size of the fragment is about 1,5 cm. Any suggestion would be much appreciated! 

 

IMG_20190130_145520.thumb.jpg.c1ed36bd4efb475c72aa4f757e67178d.jpgIMG_20190130_145614.thumb.jpg.6669682674cb39308e1ed6db6911c932.jpg

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Cool find! Haven't the slightest idea what it is. :rofl:

 

But I sure hope to visit your homeland one day. Would love to see that theatre. Just looked up some images - beautiful. 

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+1 for piece of crinoid stem. 

Pretty. :)

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30 minutes ago, andreas said:

Crinoid stem. Traumatocrinus most probably https://www.zobodat.at/pdf/GeoAlp_008_0128-0135.pdf

Thank you so much for the help! It was such a small fragment in an area full of ammonite, so I found it best to ask before making assumptions :) Sad to say most of the dig was covered in thick mud and couldn't find much. Still, happy to have discovered something something other than ammonite fragments!

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1 hour ago, facehugger said:

Cool find! Haven't the slightest idea what it is. :rofl:

 

But I sure hope to visit your homeland one day. Would love to see that theatre. Just looked up some images - beautiful. 

:) It's a beautiful place, hope you get to visit!

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22 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

+1 for piece of crinoid stem. 

Pretty. :)

Nothing too impressive, since it's just a fragment, but a find is always better than no find at all!! :)

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6 minutes ago, VStergios said:

Nothing too impressive, since it's just a fragment, but a find is always better than no find at all!! :)

Indeed! :)

But I've never found a single bit of Triassic crinoid and where I've collected in the UK and elsewhere, Triassic fossils are pretty rare. 

I'd be most happy. 

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41 minutes ago, VStergios said:

Thank you so much for the help! It was such a small fragment in an area full of ammonite, so I found it best to ask before making assumptions :) Sad to say most of the dig was covered in thick mud and couldn't find much. Still, happy to have discovered something something other than ammonite fragments!

Can we see some ammonite fragments? That would be interesting what time/age they are. Traumatocrinus is late Ladinian to Carnian.

On the left side of the pic is a Traumatocrinus stem. The thing with the pointy texture on top between the ammonoids is a part of the Traumatocrinus root.

Traumatocrinus Carnian-austriacum zone.JPG

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51 minutes ago, andreas said:

Can we see some ammonite fragments? That would be interesting what time/age they are. Traumatocrinus is late Ladinian to Carnian.

This is a compilation of my three best ammonite finds in the area. A is almost certainly a Sturia semiarata, B is probably Monophyllites wengensis and C..don't know yet :headscratch:A and B are both about 8cm in diameter but C should be 10-12 cm if complete. All come from the same Hallstatt matrix (anisian–ladinian according to geological studies in the area). Hope this was helpful :) 

AMMONITES_EPIDAVROS.jpg

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Thank you for showing!

 

Sturia semiarata is correct.

A= Monophyllites if it has a fine sculpture.(Can't see this on the pic good enough). If it's surface is smooth it is something else. (Gymnites, Japonites, Mojsvaroceras are candidates).

C= could be Argolites sp.

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1 hour ago, andreas said:

Thank you for showing!

 

Sturia semiarata is correct.

A= Monophyllites if it has a fine sculpture.(Can't see this on the pic good enough). If it's surface is smooth it is something else. (Gymnites, Japonites, Mojsvaroceras are candidates).

C= could be Argolites sp.

You've got me thinking. Guess I will have to start a new post with more detailed photos! Thanks a million, you've been more than helpful!

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  • 11 months later...

:D You're probably right! That does look like the other half of the stem! Did you find any well preserved ammonites?

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