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Is it possibe to ID?


PE Karpinski

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PE Karpinski

Hello everyone!  I am an amateur fossil hunter, I live near Lake Erie and go there several times a week looking for fossils, quartz, anything of interest.  A while ago I found a single vertebra right at the shore, and picked it up immediately.  Upon closer examination I saw it was fossilized (or at least I think it is!  Please correct me if you think otherwise, I'm still learning!)  I love having things like this in my collection but I do understand that identifying much of anything from one vertebra would be very difficult, but I figured I would post here anyways just in case.  If anyone knows what this could be from or wants more information, please post below. 

Right_side[1].jpg  Left_side[1].jpg

Cranial_view[1].jpg  Caudal_view[1].jpg

Dorsal_view[1].jpg

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PE Karpinski

Here is the ventral view as well, it would only let me put the five pictures in the post above.  I don't know if this is overkill for posting pictures, but I figured giving you a view of each side would give you a good idea of the overall size and structure. 

Ventral_view[1].jpg

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I am in for fish vert as well.  I don't think it is fossilized, though.  

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DatFossilBoy

+1 for modern fish.

As for the pictures, there are never enough so you took the good decision with the different views :) .

Regards and welcome to TFF!!!

:yay-smiley-1:

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Modern fish bones are usually pretty light. If it really seems stone like you might try tapping it lightly against something. I would use my teeth, but a spoon will do. The pitch of the sound would higher if it is mineralized.

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PE Karpinski

Thank you so much for the warm welcomes, everyone!  I was thinking it was a fish vertebra as well, I'm glad for the confirmation.  As far as modern versus fossilized, I tried tapping it like @Rockwood suggested and it does seem rather high pitched, especially in comparison to some modern fish bones I have.  So it may be fossilized.  But thank you all so much for the replies, and I look forward to learning more from this forum. 

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fifbrindacier

It's a nice one.:)

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There is another test that I find distasteful, but it may help. You can try burning an edge of it with a lighter. Stink is a positive indicator for modern bone.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Mark Kmiecik
On 3/27/2019 at 3:54 PM, Rockwood said:

There is another test that I find distasteful, but it may help. You can try burning an edge of it with a lighter. Stink is a positive indicator for modern bone.

Touch it in an inconspicuous spot with the pointed tip of a white-hot pin. No smoke or stink = rock.

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20 hours ago, Mark Kmiecik said:

Touch it in an inconspicuous spot with the pointed tip of a white-hot pin.

A pin will not stay hot enough to do the burn test on bone. The burn test needs an open flame.

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Mark Kmiecik
4 minutes ago, ynot said:

A pin will not stay hot enough to do the burn test on bone. The burn test needs an open flame.

It will if you keep it constantly within the flame of a mapp gas torch as you use it. 

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1 minute ago, Mark Kmiecik said:

It will if you keep it constantly within the flame of a mapp gas torch as you use it. 

No, it does not.

If You have to keep the pin in flame while making the test, why have the pin there?

 

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Mark Kmiecik
Just now, ynot said:

No, it does not.

If You have to keep the pin in flame while making the test, why have the pin there?

 

Ok 

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One thing I believe this thread is missing is the fact that lake Erie is very young, after the last glacial maximum. Really no chance this vertebra is mineralized. The glaciers would have destroyed this vert if had any age at all.

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11 minutes ago, fossilus said:

One thing I believe this thread is missing is the fact that lake Erie is very young, after the last glacial maximum. Really no chance this vertebra is mineralized. The glaciers would have destroyed this vert if had any age at all.

Perhaps not if it were plucked and carried in a fortunate manner.

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