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Mazon Creek ID


connorp

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This tiny guy just popped in the freezer today. I apologize if the pictures aren’t the best – the nodule is barely a centimeter at its widest point, so my phone is having a tough time focusing. If they’re not good enough let me know and I’ll try again. Anyways, I have no idea what this is! Maybe some kind of bark?

 

540F2380-47C0-47EE-A843-D52F497A65F1.thumb.jpeg.64aba8990b4403bba55898032fa96163.jpeg

1196497E-D6B5-4AA9-92DF-4C9C11020AB1.thumb.jpeg.cc9b9dc141038b834aa7cd0167cb21f3.jpeg

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Looks to perhaps be some bark?

 

Pictures are just fine. :thumbsu:

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I thought I recognized this from Nimravis' Sometimes You Have to Whack It topic. I searched for "subsurface" and here are his words:  Subsurface of the non-vascular plant  Taeniophyllum latifolium

You can do the same search in his topic to see other examples he has posted. The checkerboard pattern looked familiar. I have several of these specimens, very small, but I really like looking at them under magnification, such a striking pattern.

Nice find! Chris

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7 hours ago, bigred97 said:

I thought I recognized this from Nimravis' Sometimes You Have to Whack It topic. I searched for "subsurface" and here are his words:  Subsurface of the non-vascular plant  Taeniophyllum latifolium

You can do the same search in his topic to see other examples he has posted. The checkerboard pattern looked familiar. I have several of these specimens, very small, but I really like looking at them under magnification, such a striking pattern.

Nice find! Chris

That looks like a match! What does the term subsurface mean in this context?

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5 hours ago, stats said:

I think it could be Calamites.

 

Cheers,

Rich

 

Not sure they are but I’m often wrong! Ralph @Nimravis?

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12 hours ago, bigred97 said:

I thought I recognized this from Nimravis' Sometimes You Have to Whack It topic. I searched for "subsurface" and here are his words:  Subsurface of the non-vascular plant  Taeniophyllum latifolium

You can do the same search in his topic to see other examples he has posted. The checkerboard pattern looked familiar. I have several of these specimens, very small, but I really like looking at them under magnification, such a striking pattern.

Nice find! Chris

This is correct and I was told the ID from Jack Witry (Fiddlehead). I always like these pieces and some are very showy.

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2 hours ago, Nimravis said:

Thanks- @bigred97 had it correct.

Cool!  Looks like I should change a few labels!

 

Cheers,

Rich

 

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Thanks, @Nimravis!

 

Follow-up question - are you able to explain in a little more detail what "subsurface of the non-vascular plant" means? Does subsurface refer to below ground or that there was a layer of plant material covering the "checkerboard" when it was alive?

 

And I believe vascular means having hollow tubes. So this plant didn't have capillaries for extracting water from the ground?

 

I wonder if this will be covered in Jack's new book? Really looking forward to that whenever it is published (I thought it would be soon).

 

Thanks again, Chris

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39 minutes ago, bigred97 said:

that there was a layer of plant material covering the "checkerboard" when it was alive

That is something that I cannot answer, but I always took it as you mentioned above. You could always PM Jack and ask him.

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Those checkerboard patterns are the result of burial diagenesis. Minute cracks that form as the organic matter is turned to coal and the cracks are often filled with calcite.

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frodha10.jpg

 

 

image from:

K.A.Frodsham and R.A. Gayer

International Journal of Coal Geology 38(1999):

The impact of tectonic deformation upon coal seams in the South Wales Coalfield,UK

 

 

 

alternatively:

https://pygs.lyellcollection.org/content/56/1/15.short

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mark Kmiecik
17 hours ago, bigred97 said:

Thanks, @Nimravis!

 

Follow-up question - are you able to explain in a little more detail what "subsurface of the non-vascular plant" means? Does subsurface refer to below ground or that there was a layer of plant material covering the "checkerboard" when it was alive?

 

And I believe vascular means having hollow tubes. So this plant didn't have capillaries for extracting water from the ground?

 

I wonder if this will be covered in Jack's new book? Really looking forward to that whenever it is published (I thought it would be soon).

 

Thanks again, Chris

Due this month if I recall correctly.

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On 10/3/2019 at 1:55 AM, westcoast said:

Those checkerboard patterns are the result of burial diagenesis. Minute cracks that form as the organic matter is turned to coal and the cracks are often filled with calcite.

So are these patterns attributable only to indeterminate plant material? I could not find any literature (outside Jack Witry's literature) that referenced Taeniophyllum.

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47 minutes ago, connorp said:

So are these patterns attributable only to indeterminate plant material? I could not find any literature (outside Jack Witry's literature) that referenced Taeniophyllum.

Yes, the checkerboard patterns will form in a variety of plant types depending on diagenesis

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