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Mazon creek stuff


will stevenson

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will stevenson

Hi guys I have no locational info on the pits these were collected but some do have the layering typical of the actual creek specifically the Pecopteris but I was wondering if anyone could provide some accurate id’s thanks so much:)

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First one is Cordaites sp. The one that looks like daisies is Sphenophyllum sp. The ones that look like fans are Cyclopteris sp. The ferns are Pecopteris sp., possibly miltoni, although you should be aware that some taxa have been renamed and I am not yet familiar with all the changes. The long tongue-shaped ones are either Macroneuropteris scheuchzeri or Macroneuropteris clarki or one or the other or both, but there is not enough detail visible in the photographs to tell. If you can see what appear to be hairs that lie across the veins it's scheuchzeri, if not then it's most probably clarki. The typical layering of the creek as you mentioned is really not endemic to the creek itself but can be found in most locations. That type of layering is more indicative of strata as opposed to topography, and the wear created by moving water merely embellishes the appearance. The lower you go in the Francis Creek Shale member, the more "layered" the specimens become and this stratum forms a large portion of the creek bed. The Francis Creek shale is anywhere from 8 inches to 8 meters thick and forms two distinct biotas, which you can Google to read additional info.

 

It's a decent collection of Mazon Creek material, and although commonly found species, a fine addition to any serious collection. And now you need some fauna. :) So the addiction continues.

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will stevenson
2 hours ago, Mark Kmiecik said:

First one is Cordaites sp. The one that looks like daisies is Sphenophyllum sp. The ones that look like fans are Cyclopteris sp. The ferns are Pecopteris sp., possibly miltoni, although you should be aware that some taxa have been renamed and I am not yet familiar with all the changes. The long tongue-shaped ones are either Macroneuropteris scheuchzeri or Macroneuropteris clarki or one or the other or both, but there is not enough detail visible in the photographs to tell. If you can see what appear to be hairs that lie across the veins it's scheuchzeri, if not then it's most probably clarki. The typical layering of the creek as you mentioned is really not endemic to the creek itself but can be found in most locations. That type of layering is more indicative of strata as opposed to topography, and the wear created by moving water merely embellishes the appearance. The lower you go in the Francis Creek Shale member, the more "layered" the specimens become and this stratum forms a large portion of the creek bed. The Francis Creek shale is anywhere from 8 inches to 8 meters thick and forms two distinct biotas, which you can Google to read additional info.

 

It's a decent collection of Mazon Creek material, and although commonly found species, a fine addition to any serious collection. And now you need some fauna. :) So the addiction continues.

thanks so much, i will get some better photos tomorrow evening:), i will also take a picture of the soft bodied worm that i have

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Nice acorn worm. Less common than other worms from MC. Chowder flats is mostly single family homes now, with fossils popping up in the yards due to winter heave.

 

I think I can see the "hairs" on some of the Macroneuropteris pinna, but that's something you can determine with a 5x magnifier. You'll know exactly what I'm referring to the moment you see them. They run at an angle oblique to the veins.

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