Jump to content

Cutting my teeth on teeth identification?


Shaun-DFW Fossils

Recommended Posts

Happy Thanksgiving to those who celebrate! Thanks to all of you who try to help the less educated such as myself (at least in this field of study). I occasionally come across the remnants of back-office dumpsters from ancient dental offices where mammals would go to get teeth pulled. Ok, joking.. but seriously, I’ve reviewed some helpful threads on tooth identification but I’m not confident in what I see. 1) do my photos give enough of a view to say with confidence what they belonged to? 2) can you help me identify these? Let’s count 1-6 starting with upper left. Don’t worry about identifying the hand, that’s mine. I think #1 upper left is camel. I don’t know about #2. I think #3 (upper right) is bison? Thanks in advance! These are all from Johnson County and Tarrant County TX. Mostly Tarrant County. 

59F376C1-897F-4794-8DE6-F96A03CAE187.jpeg

1F10FE48-9094-47BE-9376-B43DEE332AC2.jpeg

B4695BF4-2B75-4B9B-9EDD-AF055C6849DD.jpeg

07A22822-99A0-4F2D-BCE9-ACFEFB678361.jpeg

Edited by Shaun-DFW Fossils
  • Enjoyed 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi there.

 

Everything I see looks like a Bos (bison) or possibly modern bovine or cow. 

 

I recently ID a tooth almost identical to this and everything I found was that the stylid  is pretty important to bison. Cow typically don’t have it. 
 

size and as I’ve been told “robustness” are also factors as the fossil age bison were much larger. 

Jp

 

Here are some images for comparison. 
 

Bo’s tooth. Juvenile 

F785AD75-8CC7-41AE-A316-B031A8A1BA36.thumb.jpeg.26373f5439d50319e640eb422d7b8293.jpeg


a similar situation found by @johnnyvaldez7.jv

D07C4E38-82D0-483D-97B4-392D868CE10D.thumb.jpeg.342cf971e3b02f6248dae71fac4c0665.jpeg

 

The image is blurry at the original location but typically if Harry has a gallery image for it you can stop looking for answers  :) 

3ACCEA3B-B12A-4563-8A27-3B3791F0C2C9.jpeg.bb551c90ad884dbe1426eb46a6bf2310.jpeg

  • Thank You 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Balance said:

Hi there.

 

Everything I see looks like a Bos (bison) or possibly modern bovine or cow. 

 

I recently ID a tooth almost identical to this and everything I found was that the stylid  is pretty important to bison. Cow typically don’t have it. 
 

size and as I’ve been told “robustness” are also factors as the fossil age bison were much larger. 

Jp

 

Here are some images for comparison. 
 

Bo’s tooth. Juvenile 

F785AD75-8CC7-41AE-A316-B031A8A1BA36.thumb.jpeg.26373f5439d50319e640eb422d7b8293.jpeg


a similar situation found by @johnnyvaldez7.jv

D07C4E38-82D0-483D-97B4-392D868CE10D.thumb.jpeg.342cf971e3b02f6248dae71fac4c0665.jpeg

 

The image is blurry at the original location but typically if Harry has a gallery image for it you can stop looking for answers  :) 

3ACCEA3B-B12A-4563-8A27-3B3791F0C2C9.jpeg.bb551c90ad884dbe1426eb46a6bf2310.jpeg

Thank you for the help and the examples! I thought the one without the stylid and no separation between teeth might be camel, but I definitely thought most of the rest were likely bison or cow. Sidenote, for some reason, I get no notifications when people make comments..all I see is if someone reacts to a post. My problem or a site issue?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cows do have isolated stylids.  When the fossil tooth loses cementum, as happens sometimes, the stylid attachment to the crown is low, at the level of the protocingulum.  That leaves much of the stylid unsupported and vulnerable to separation down to the attachment point.

 

bison_bos_m3.JPG.69ada56161a622f6060e29692cdb650b.JPG

The stylid attachment is exposed as a loop in this well-worn Bos m3. v

bison_bos_m3_B.JPG.f09dd11104ffecd18a77271bd8041f7c.JPG

 

cow_cheekteeth.JPG.684b7cbf4c796184bbe5ab6e34de0d3b.JPG

 

  • I found this Informative 2

http://pristis.wix.com/the-demijohn-page

 

What seest thou else

In the dark backward and abysm of time?

---Shakespeare, The Tempest

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Shaun-DFW Fossils said:

Thank you for the help and the examples! I thought the one without the stylid and no separation between teeth might be camel, but I definitely thought most of the rest were likely bison or cow. Sidenote, for some reason, I get no notifications when people make comments..all I see is if someone reacts to a post. My problem or a site issue?


Seems I also had myself twisted up a bit with the terms. Thanks, Harry! 
 

Shaun that first tooth does look like a different animal. Camel could be a good search point. 
 

Jp

  • Enjoyed 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Shaun-DFW Fossils said:

 ... I think #1 upper left is camel. I don’t know about #2. I think #3 (upper right) is bison? Thanks in advance! These are all from Johnson County and Tarrant County TX. Mostly Tarrant County. 

 

1F10FE48-9094-47BE-9376-B43DEE332AC2.jpeg

 

 

I have a nagging thought that the #1 tooth is displayed upside down.  That is, we're seeing the root end of an unerupted tooth, probably not camel.

  • I found this Informative 1
  • I Agree 1

http://pristis.wix.com/the-demijohn-page

 

What seest thou else

In the dark backward and abysm of time?

---Shakespeare, The Tempest

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...