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USB Microscope for Photography


patelinho7

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Hi all,

 

I’m looking to invest in better closeup photography equipment. I’m specifically looking for USB microscope suggestions but I’m open to other suggestions such as macro lenses. Keep in mind I have an iPhone XS. Decent camera but definitely older and less crystal clear than most phones. Please let me know of product names or DM listings to me (or direct me to old threads if they exist, already looked at a couple), I’d really appreciate it.
 

Thanks

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6 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Thanks. I didn't think to use the word "digital". Brought up new stuff.

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@patelinho7, I also have an iPhone XS and find that the photography can be rather lackluster, particularly for smaller fossils. I have not done as much fossil photography as I would like, but I have found the Celestron Handheld Digital Microscope Pro to be a phenomenal tool for capturing images of those smaller fossils. It pairs well with Windows and I believe that it may also be compatible with Mac. Below are some pictures that I've taken using the microscope. 

 

922829523_LargeBrachiopod(micro).thumb.jpg.56d6c70b6fa8cb7f8e81ec17c03f3fa9.jpg

 

1348668144_Brachiopod6.thumb.jpg.c63468516642231854eb2dffab9875c6.jpg

 

Some Ordovician brachiopods from the Edinburg formation. These were some of the first photographs I took with the microscope, so better imaging can be attained with more experience. 

 

30978793_4B-Anomotodonsp.(Lingual).thumb.jpg.9e746db2fd754811aeb9e2c2988b7529.jpg

 

695543540_E-Paleohypotodussp.(Lingual).thumb.jpg.0a0bc8577634df1f0d21a5dc314bff0b.jpg

 

1805047932_E-Paleohypotodussp.(Labial).jpg.b6943a4b5199976a7b806937a7c02a18.jpg

 

Some small shark teeth from the Aquia formation. The last photo includes a Q-tip to provide some sense of scale. 

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11 hours ago, Andúril Flame of the West said:

@patelinho7, I also have an iPhone XS and find that the photography can be rather lackluster, particularly for smaller fossils. I have not done as much fossil photography as I would like, but I have found the Celestron Handheld Digital Microscope Pro to be a phenomenal tool for capturing images of those smaller fossils. It pairs well with Windows and I believe that it may also be compatible with Mac. Below are some pictures that I've taken using the microscope. 

 

922829523_LargeBrachiopod(micro).thumb.jpg.56d6c70b6fa8cb7f8e81ec17c03f3fa9.jpg

 

1348668144_Brachiopod6.thumb.jpg.c63468516642231854eb2dffab9875c6.jpg

 

Some Ordovician brachiopods from the Edinburg formation. These were some of the first photographs I took with the microscope, so better imaging can be attained with more experience. 

 

30978793_4B-Anomotodonsp.(Lingual).thumb.jpg.9e746db2fd754811aeb9e2c2988b7529.jpg

 

695543540_E-Paleohypotodussp.(Lingual).thumb.jpg.0a0bc8577634df1f0d21a5dc314bff0b.jpg

 

1805047932_E-Paleohypotodussp.(Labial).jpg.b6943a4b5199976a7b806937a7c02a18.jpg

 

Some small shark teeth from the Aquia formation. The last photo includes a Q-tip to provide some sense of scale. 


Those are fantastic photos, especially of the teeth! Thanks for the recommendation, especially with the scale. Good to know how small it can go. I will take a look.

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Just get a decent used optical microscope and then use your iPhone as the microscope camera. @cngodles has an excellent guide.

 

Digital microscopes are seemingly always disappointing. I own the Darwin M2 and I am pretty pleased for quick work but it pales in comparison to what could be done with my optical scope or what @cngodles regularly posts 

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On 6/3/2024 at 9:33 PM, NickG said:

Just get a decent used optical microscope and then use your iPhone as the microscope camera. @cngodles has an excellent guide.

 

Digital microscopes are seemingly always disappointing. I own the Darwin M2 and I am pretty pleased for quick work but it pales in comparison to what could be done with my optical scope or what @cngodles regularly posts 


Thank you. I actually have a decent microscope with a single eyepiece but I’ve always had trouble knowing how to have the lighting work for me. Whenever I put a specimen that’s larger than an ideal slide size, it’s hard to position the lens above the rock or whatever 3-D structure such that it picks up the specimen in detail without making contact with the specimen. Also, when I do finally focus it, the specimen blocks the light source and the surface is completely dark. Now that you mention using microscopes, I am sure I’m using it incorrectly and there is a way to make it work. @cngodles, do you have a link to your guide @NickG mentioned? I’d really appreciate some insight. Thanks everyone

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