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Chalk/limestone impressions, unknown line traces, spherical item, and a tooth(?) in shale


MrNLovesRocks

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Good Monday! I bring you a few items from my traditional rock path checks.

 

Firstly I was assisting at an event near Carthage, Missouri and found a few interesting fragments. It was a historical farmstead from before 1865 with local sandstone and limestone masonry as well as modern broken rock drives and the like.

 

First here is are samples of the kinds of stone there. (Scale is cm/mm):

 

PXL_20240610_162447163.thumb.jpg.de2b25988a55f6e31d7e6aada342e2da.jpg

 

 

I couldn't get any of the more sandstone like masonry stone as it was, well, masoned well and I didn't think chipping the barn would be allowed. Found a nice chunk of layered shell impressions that look like they might be brachiopods but I don't know if there were groove-shelled bivalves at that fime? The two white stones are from the rock paths, which also had more typical hard gray silicified limestone typical of gravel used in this area, which is upper Pennsylvanian typically. I don't know if these white pieces are chalk but they seem to be more porous and softer than the other limestone. Leaves a white streak, lots of small fragmentary fossils of shelled organisms and white translucent crystal inclusions. Any ideas? Is this a bit of chalk deposit from the Niobara chalk? I struggled to find geological info on Missouri previously so any suggestions there would be appreciated.

 

Then I found this in the fallen rocks near the base of the barn, where a lot of small pieces had fallen out of the slowly weathering barn rock: 

 

PXL_20240610_162334097.thumb.jpg.9f439dd57a77fc044885f720c1ed0a85.jpgPXL_20240610_162306413.thumb.jpg.0d73a2c19017c967cacd041159b7be66.jpg

 

 

 The color is off from my lighting but it is a white to light grey in color, a stem like end and fourfold split from a "posterior" to "anterior". Wrinkled exterior. Hard like mineral against rock, scratches with steel and appears to leave a white crystalline residue when marked. Everyone I've asked said it's a seed, but I can't think of a way to prove it's mineralized other than striking in or trying to split it. Any ideas? 

 

Lastly, from the new rock drive at my parents' house in Miami County, KS. A piece of flaky shale with what might be a shell or a bit of tooth?

 

PXL_20240610_161916085.thumb.jpg.69337c015c69a292982714ae9c523814.jpg

 

Also very interested in what the snakeskin texture item is in the closest corner of the stone in this second image:

 

PXL_20240610_162000631.thumb.jpg.df1bc8ffb7360cd317a62caa6a0c27fe.jpg

 

If I were to extract these manually would I need to super glue the visible parts first to keep them intact? Any tips on if I could or should or a good approach? I only have dental picks and thumbtacks and the like for tools. 

 

Thanks and have a good rest of your day!

 

 

PXL_20240610_162142380.jpg

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Some closer photos with markings for the last peice:

 

The "tooth" item as I identified it:

 

PXL_20240610_1619160852.thumb.jpg.87ba9d3a207c12f6495f3b15d9c2279d.jpg

 

 

 

The "snakeskin" structure enlarged and bracketed roughly in red (these are 0.5mm long and maybe 0.2mm wide?):

 

PXL_20240610_1620006313.thumb.jpg.08909d2e15c5bb44000aa75ed5bdf75c.jpg

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Correction because I can't edit my above post currently: the measurements of the "snakeskin" items should be cm not mm. So that's 0.5cm long and approximately 0.2cm wide

 

+-+-+-+-+-+-+

 

Another upload of images: some better pictures of the white rock that I am unsure of the type. I have several pieces including what makes me think it is chalk and chert: that's a typical arrangement in the native limestone near here according to the KGIS but I haven't personally seen much chalk in my daily experience of local rock product. It's also Missouri and I'm more familiar with Kansas stone.

 

IMG_20240611_001456279.thumb.jpg.c5f11ebc94318a9270776479687251b2.jpg

 

 

This piece looks to me like a chert and chalk composite piece, the white part is porous and soft, streaks on tile and scratches into white crystalline powder.

The blue grey part has no visible crystals and is very hard, and fractures at angles as visible here. Help with rock identification would be appreciated also!

 

IMG_20240611_001801472.thumb.jpg.b3a9eefdb09a108651208425f24ff51c.jpg

 

This piece is in the "chalk" as I called it, interesting long trace and the second image shows what my pareidolic eye sees as maybe a head or body structure. Rock or fossil? I see fossilized gastropod shells with white calcite crystals too, am I identifying that correctly?

 

Unknown trace tracks, unknown bivalve or gastropod shells with crystalline infill center and lower right

 

IMG_20240611_001652705.thumb.jpg.fa69a903b71d0365c0ed1342aa421bbc.jpg

 

Backside of same rock with end of trace pattern and other cross sections (possible head or body of something? Just a bivalve mold?)

 

IMG_20240611_001746015.thumb.jpg.748b0e1b76f793526389369b9589b038.jpg

 

Rotated to better center the larger fossil trace with crystal infill. Is this just other shell material around that crystal formations or is theis something more complex than a small mollusk?

 

IMG_20240611_001719877.thumb.jpg.596498b7d1aa39210df0f0204335e7c9.jpg

 

 

And this is a better shot of the "tooth" from above with the tape placed across for depth and scale (the "tooth" is centered on the 6cm mark on the tape)

 

IMG_20240611_001625215.thumb.jpg.d328c232e2c53e4700e5a6025b152bbc.jpg

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4 hours ago, MrNLovesRocks said:

The "snakeskin" structure enlarged and bracketed roughly in red (these are 0.5mm long and maybe 0.2mm wide?):

 

PXL_20240610_1620006313.thumb.jpg.08909d2e15c5bb44000aa75ed5bdf75c.jpg

Those are Ramos’s “stick” bryozoa.

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My goal is to leave no stone or fossil unturned.   

See my Arizona Paleontology Guide    link  The best single resource for Arizona paleontology anywhere.       

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These are cross sections of Bryozoa fronds.

 

IMG_0967.jpeg

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My goal is to leave no stone or fossil unturned.   

See my Arizona Paleontology Guide    link  The best single resource for Arizona paleontology anywhere.       

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I'd bet dollars to donuts, your tooth is more likely a Rugose coral. Sometimes called Horn Coral, due to their shape.

Better, close up pictures and some prep might change my mind.

    Tim    -  VETERAN SHALE SPLITTER

   VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png    VFOTM  --- APRIL - 2015       MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png      PaleoPartner.png.30c01982e09b0cc0b7d9d6a7a21f56c6.png.a600039856933851eeea617ca3f2d15f.png     Postmaster1.jpg.900efa599049929531fa81981f028e24.jpg        IPFOTM -- MAY - 2024   IPFOTM5.png.fb4f2a268e315c58c5980ed865b39e1f.png

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Hackberry seed?

 

Cropped and brightened/color corrected:

 

PXL_20240610_162334097.jpg.321736fe5477a3f0a152b98aeb653837.jpg

 

PXL_20240610_162306413.jpg.d78772b64de7040269be06462ed9cf3c.jpg

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    Tim    -  VETERAN SHALE SPLITTER

   VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png    VFOTM  --- APRIL - 2015       MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png      PaleoPartner.png.30c01982e09b0cc0b7d9d6a7a21f56c6.png.a600039856933851eeea617ca3f2d15f.png     Postmaster1.jpg.900efa599049929531fa81981f028e24.jpg        IPFOTM -- MAY - 2024   IPFOTM5.png.fb4f2a268e315c58c5980ed865b39e1f.png

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"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks."

John Muir ~ ~ ~ ~   ><))))( *>  About Me      

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Thanks everyone for the input!

 

Does rugose coral have that smooth of a surface? I am struggling to see a dentine interior so I was leaning maybe toward a chunk of bivalve shell but tooth is more exciting.

 

And I'm honestly super excited to have near-microscopic bryozoan! Any tips on further reading there?

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36 minutes ago, MrNLovesRocks said:

Does rugose coral have that smooth of a surface?

 

Depends on how worn it is. I have some that have really pronounced growth lines and ridges, and others that are completely smooth.

Again, better close up pictures of the item itself, along with some removal of matrix from around the item might tell us more.

    Tim    -  VETERAN SHALE SPLITTER

   VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png    VFOTM  --- APRIL - 2015       MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png      PaleoPartner.png.30c01982e09b0cc0b7d9d6a7a21f56c6.png.a600039856933851eeea617ca3f2d15f.png     Postmaster1.jpg.900efa599049929531fa81981f028e24.jpg        IPFOTM -- MAY - 2024   IPFOTM5.png.fb4f2a268e315c58c5980ed865b39e1f.png

_________________________________________________________________________________
"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks."

John Muir ~ ~ ~ ~   ><))))( *>  About Me      

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3 hours ago, MrNLovesRocks said:

Does rugose coral have that smooth of a surface?

They can-  it depends on preservation like Tim said, and some species are smoother than others.  I personally am not fully convinced that it is a horn coral yet- If possible, can we please get clear, close ups?  Seems kind of interesting to me. 

3 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

Hackberry seed?

I also think this is a seed.  Sometimes seeds can seem like rock- I've been fooled a few times in the past.  I wouldn't break it open yet just in case however.

-Jay

 

 

“The earth doesn't need new continents, but new men.”
― Jules Verne, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

 

 

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8 hours ago, MrNLovesRocks said:

I can't think of a way to prove it's mineralized other than striking in or trying to split it. Any ideas? 

Maybe try putting it over a flame?  It should burn if it's just a seed.

-Jay

 

 

“The earth doesn't need new continents, but new men.”
― Jules Verne, Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

 

 

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