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East Berne member of the Mount Marion formation trip


Tjbfossils

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Today my father and I ventured to a deep ravine in Albany county that cuts through the Mount Marion formation in search of cephalopods. Thank you to Jeffrey and Dr Bartholomew for the tips. This bed is in the East Berne member below the Dave Elliot bed. We did t expect to find much or even locate the bed but it ended up being easier than we thought and writhing 45 minutes of finding the bed we gathered a small collection. We found our first ever plant fossils, some nice goniatites, one measuring over 3 inches across, some straight cephalopods, bivalves, and brachiopods. It was a great trip and my father was thrilled. We might venture there again but this time head south in search of other productive beds. The goniatite apparently is a tornoceras mesopleuron

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Edited by Tjbfossils
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Nice finds. Where is it, somewhere in New York state? Devonian?

 

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11 hours ago, Wrangellian said:

Nice finds. Where is it, somewhere in New York state? Devonian?

 

Thank you! Yes New York I forgot to include that and this would be middle Devonian. Hamilton group marcellus shale, the East Berne member of the Mount Marion formation. I’m just learning the strata. 

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Thanks, I figured viewers would like to have that info  ;)

I like the plant fossils as much as the others, especially the branching ones.

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13 minutes ago, Wrangellian said:

Thanks, I figured viewers would like to have that info  ;)

I like the plant fossils as much as the others, especially the branching ones.

Thank you. The branching ones are my favorite as well. I was so preoccupied with the one plant fossil I didn’t notice the goniatite with suture pattern on the other side 

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Excellent haul there! Congratulations. It's been years since I visited that site, but your finds may inspire me to return. By the way, plant fossils are often prevalent in Middle Devonian marine deposits of central and eastern New York. The shore was relatively nearby to the east and plant debris would drift into the sea where it would fossilize with various marine organisms. The areas where these plants actually lived has long since eroded away, so these remnants are all that's left. 

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1 minute ago, Jeffrey P said:

Excellent haul there! Congratulations. It's been years since I visited that site, but your finds may inspire me to return. By the way, plant fossils are often prevalent in Middle Devonian marine deposits of central and eastern New York. The shore was relatively nearby to the east and plant debris would drift into the sea where it would fossilize with various marine organisms. The areas where these plants actually lived has long since eroded away, so these remnants are all that's left. 

Thank you! I would definitely go again. Dr. Bartholomew sent me his paper on the theory of the landscape during this time period and I was blown away at the detective work they use to create these theories. 

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Nice haul thanks for sharing. I also do much of my hunting in and around the Catskills of NY. Casts of branches can be common in some areas and devoid in others. Red shale seems to hold mainly root castings. Good luck on your hunting thanks again for posting Chris 

picture of a root cast for reference sometimes I find them with the base sticking out 

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21 minutes ago, Stingray said:

Nice haul thanks for sharing. I also do much of my hunting in and around the Catskills of NY. Casts of branches can be common in some areas and devoid in others. Red shale seems to hold mainly root castings. Good luck on your hunting thanks again for posting Chris 

picture of a root cast for reference sometimes I find them with the base sticking out 

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Very cool thanks for sharing! 

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