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Fossil Bones, Teeth Or Wood? Help Needed


RavenCrow

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Hi everyone,

I found this forum a couple of days ago and this is my first post.

I live in Portugal in an area known for it's fossils, I have official dinossaur tracks about 2 km from my place and the whole area has fossils all around.

Ever since i was a kid i've been collecting what i thought were dinosaur teeth. Lots of them were just in the soil surface others were a bit buried. A lot of them are stuck in stone and those i could never get out. Over the years most of the places i used to collect this from were destroyed, new building were created there, roads, etc. Destroying all the rocks that had hundreads of what i called "teeth" stuck in them.

Anyway, i don't understand anything of fossils so i would like your help. At first i thought they could be some ancient wild boar teeth since a lot of them are curved at the end, but now i think these might be bones or maybe even wood or a sediment i don't know. I have hundreads of them and there were hundread more destroyed over the years, the whole place had so many that i thought impossible that like 3000 teeth all ended up in the same place...

Here are the photos, any help trying to understand these would be highly appreciated, thanks!

Bones1

A small collection of them, they all look cilindrical and gradually sharpened from the base to the top.

Notice also how cleanly cut they are, i believe it might have been during the fossilization process that some pressure broke them.

bones1u.jpg

Bones2

This is one of the best i have, notice the marks that run along it. If i put it on it's side it REALLY looks like a boar tusk.

bones2g.jpg

Bones 3

This one is strange and it has several smaller marks next to it, which leads me to think none of them could be bones and just some sediment, wood or plant structure instead.

bones3.jpg

Bones4

This one has strange liquid like marks towards the bottom it's strange (leads me to think it could be a sediment of some sort).

It was also broken but still stuck, showing that this is probably how the others were broken so cleanly.

bones4.jpg

Bones5

These have a very white surface, very bone like.

bones5u.jpg

Bones6

A detail of some of the clean cuts. Notice they were all found like this i did nothing but water them.

bones6s.jpg

Bones7

This one is my imagination working, thinking that if they were teeth it could have been something like this.

bones7.jpg

I'm keeping my fingers crossed, waiting for your replies. Hopefully it will be something nice!

Thanks again,

Raven

Edited by RavenCrow
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I know nothing about the geology of your area. These don't look like teeth, but could they be of volcanic origin?

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I am pretty sure, due to lack of enamel and any apparent internal structure, that these specimens are neither teeth nor bones. I would very much like to figure out what they are, though, because the sheer number of similarly-shaped objects at least suggests an organic origin (though mineral formation cannot be ruled out).

Where in Portugal were these found? If we can determine the geologic formation, we'll have two powerful clues that bear on our search for an answer: age, and the environment of deposition.

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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Regarding the rock where they are usually found maybe these images will help.

These are still in the rock, some other appear on the ground already free.

Let me know if it helps in the identification.

rock1g.jpg

rock2r.jpg

rock3i.jpg

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...They were found in Belas, near Lisbon.

The geologic map shows that as Lower Cretaceous, and a little e-research indicates that fossils from that area are terrestrial (not marine), with trees and woody plants dominating. I still can't completely reconcile what I see in your first pictures with this information, but the new pictures you just posted do look like limb-casts.

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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If you google "geologic map of Portugal", and sort through the choices, you will find one that is useful in your case.

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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Neat stuff! With the similar shape and seemingly uniform matrix I'm wondering if these could be infilled burrows. Root cast also seems like an option. I'll watch this thread closely as these are really interesting. Thanks for posting.

"They ... savoured the strange warm glow of being much more ignorant than ordinary people, who were only ignorant of ordinary things."

-- Terry Pratchett

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Could they be cone in cone mineralizations? Tough call through a picture. Got one still in matrix?

What do you mean by still in Matrix?

Thanks for all the answers so far... and here i thought this was going to be easy to identify!

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I'm not being facetious with the usual "It must be a rudist" catch all but if the strata turns out to be marine, not terrestrial, then I would say they look just like the internal casts of rudists very similar to what we see here in the early Cretaceous of Texas.

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I have some dinosaur material from Lisbon including a Baryonyx tooth, it is a very interesting area.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thanks for all the answers,

So the conclusion is that it might be some mineral formation of a sort?

I still think that they might be Rudists: LINK

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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  • 1 month later...

Hi Auspex,

I have to say i do see some similarities, but if that was the case, shouldn't they have some sort of internal structure?

The cuts in mine (see bone6) show clear cuts without any internal structure.

let me know what you think,

Golg

Edited by RavenCrow
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I was about to opine RUDIST as well.....erose beat me to it.

Grüße,

Daniel A. Wöhr aus Südtexas

"To the motivated go the spoils."

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looks like terrestrial deposit on a dissolved limestone surface, could have cave mineral formations, marine fossils and terrestrial bone and plant material, (as you all have speculated upon). Haven't been to Oklahoma but believe the Permian terrestrial vertebrate beds are in dissolved pockets of marine Pennsylvanian limestone there. Would guess that this would occur in a variety of ages and situations.

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