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Newly Found Fossils.need Help With Identification


fishman1520

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hello.this is my first post..im hoping that i can get some help with fossil identifications.i found all these yesterday in dry creek bed behind my house here in n.austin.i believe they are exogyra.very thick and heavy bivalves.i also found what i believe to be fossilized long bone fragments.they were all sticking out of the wall of the creek bed in one small location.i plan to return with a pick and shovel to see if more exist there.can anyone tell me from the photo if i am correct in this assumption...thank u

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Regarding the cylindrical objects in the second photo: the left-most piece exhibits the complex sutures of an ammonite, and may not belong in the group. The rest don't necessarily look like bone to me; it would help to see a good end-view.

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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That's quite a few Exogyras. The long fossils appear to be Baculites, a straight-shelled ammonite. But as Auspex suggested some end views would help with that ID. The bottom-most right one looks a little twisted and may be something else.

You should get a geologic map of the Austin area and figure out what formation these are coming from. The Bureau of Economic Geology sells several that would work for North Austin. Once you know the formation you can probably narrow down the Exogyras to species and maybe even the Baculites.

Welcome to the forum.

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That's quite a few Exogyras. The long fossils appear to be Baculites, a straight-shelled ammonite. But as Auspex suggested some end views would help with that ID. The bottom-most right one looks a little twisted and may be something else.

You should get a geologic map of the Austin area and figure out what formation these are coming from. The Bureau of Economic Geology sells several that would work for North Austin. Once you know the formation you can probably narrow down the Exogyras to species and maybe even the Baculites.

Welcome to the forum.

thank you.yes the one odd piece that you referred to actually has some shiny surface areas.and i tend to agree.i found it in the same location as the cylindrical pieces,so i thought they were related..i have since gone through my bag of yesterdays find(about 30lbs)and have located about 6 more pieces.i will post a few more pictures.one is quite larger.

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Regarding the cylindrical objects in the second photo: the left-most piece exhibits the complex sutures of an ammonite, and may not belong in the group. The rest don't necessarily look like bone to me; it would help to see a good end-view.

thank you.i have some better photos(not from cell phone) but cant figure out how to post in this discussion.

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thank you.yes the one odd piece that you referred to actually has some shiny surface areas.and i tend to agree.i found it in the same location as the cylindrical pieces,so i thought they were related..i have since gone through my bag of yesterdays find(about 30lbs)and have located about 6 more pieces.i will post a few more pictures.one is quite larger.

ok after further research,they do seem to be baculites.my next question is how big did these organisms get.i have one section of baculite that has the circumference of the size of a silver dollar.only about 2" section in length.im sure if i return with a pick,i can find lots more,and hopefully a fully intact specimen.thank you very much for your input.any additional info is greatly appreciated.

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That's quite a few Exogyras. The long fossils appear to be Baculites, a straight-shelled ammonite. But as Auspex suggested some end views would help with that ID. The bottom-most right one looks a little twisted and may be something else.

You should get a geologic map of the Austin area and figure out what formation these are coming from. The Bureau of Economic Geology sells several that would work for North Austin. Once you know the formation you can probably narrow down the Exogyras to species and maybe even the Baculites.

Welcome to the forum.

thank you,its nice to have a forum of like interest people,the exogyras are abundant in this particular creek,uppr and lower segments.i returned after about an hour with 37 upper spiral portions of the bivalve.i cant wait to return next week and explore more of the creek.and hope to find other species as well.i did find 2 echinoderms as well there.to add to my collection,which is now 12.

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The photo only opens as a thumbnail. Hang in there you'll get the hang of it. There are instructions on the forum...

Some species of Baculites can get big. There are two known from the local Taylor Group that are better than 2 inches in "diameter".

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