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Gardening In Clay Dirt, Jaw?


JohnHanks

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Hey all,

So for everyone out there, I feel I have little information. I found this in my backyard when I was planting some peas and beans near a fence on New Year's Eve.

The specimen was found in a clayish dirt. There were other rocks (that which I cannot identify) in the dirt, however if it is necessary I can take pictures of my land to help with age identification, since y'all are crazy smart and can tell such things by looking at rocks.

I can also clean the specimen up a bit more and take more pics if need be, but I still need to do some lurking in the forums to figure out the best way to do so without damaging the specimen.

The specimen is quite heavy; heavy like a rock. I don't know much about fossils but I did learn a bit about petrified wood and how lava or whatever can replace the minerals making them all heavy.

Here are my pics.

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Also as per location, this was one of the original farmhouses (1897) of Highland Park, CA (North East Los Angeles)

Happy Identifying (:

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Thanks Missourian for the clam education! I had no idea!

Or the unique weathering on sandstone!

Bev :)

The more I learn, I realize the less I know.

:wacko:
 
 

Go to my

Gallery for images of Fossil Jewelry, Sculpture & Crafts
 

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I have to weigh in on the side of inorganic origin, but that leaves a big area to speculate on how it formed (natural processes, I think), and how it came to be where you found it (curio decor for some long-forgotten garden?).

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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Welcome to the forum.

If it's sandstone, it could be honeycomb weathering:

http://www.google.co...iw=1075&bih=763

There is also a small chance it could be clam borings:

http://www.lakeneosh...t/69/index.html

but the polygonal shape of some of the holes makes that doubtful:

Interesting reply! I guess it's on to identifying the type of stone. I think I will bring this to the Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits someday and see what they have to say about it.

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So this is probably honeycomb weathering as I live in a friggin desert. The bivalve borings seem to be slightly more uniform (in circularity.) I'd like to find more pieces of this and I'd also like to get an aging on this. Is it worth it to get this aged? or meh

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It's a sterling geological mystery; if it were me, I'd pursue it!

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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....Is it worth it to get this aged? or meh

If time, money, or resources don't prohibit it, it's always worth learning something new. Plus, you're bound to learn a bunch of stuff along the way to figuring this thing out.

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