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Fossil?


astron

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Hello all.

A friend of mine has found this thing that he believes is a fossil pine cone.(2 million years old).

What do you think?

Thanks much for the help.

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Astrinos P. Damianakis

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Hi Astrinos,

It looks like one to me, at last a mould of one (only the matrix remaining in between the cone bracts). Is it from Crete also?

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Eric and Missourian,

Thanks for your answers ;)

Eric, It's not from Crete and I have no more elements of the item available.

Any way, I believe that if I found this one I'd had left it back considering it's about a concretion, or - the more- I'd had placed it in the ''It reminds me of'' thread as a pine cone reminder...

Probably I am wrong...

Astrinos P. Damianakis

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Astrinos... Its unusal whatever it is... it looks the same matrix as the surround rock... only with the regular formed voids....

Cheers Steve... And Welcome if your a New Member... :)

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Given that the matrix seems to be a silty/sandy material, and given that the structure itself seems to be composed of crystaline materials, my guess is that this is some sort of evaporite deposit formed by mineral laden groundwater seeping through dessication cracks in the sediment. My guess would be that the material is gypsum (a calcium sulfate). I've seen similar materials from arid areas in the southwest US.

Rich

The plural of "anecdote" is not "evidence".

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Given that the matrix seems to be a silty/sandy material, and given that the structure itself seems to be composed of crystaline materials, my guess is that this is some sort of evaporite deposit formed by mineral laden groundwater seeping through dessication cracks in the sediment. My guess would be that the material is gypsum (a calcium sulfate). I've seen similar materials from arid areas in the southwest US.

Rich

yes I agree looks very much like Dessert rose gypsum

"A man who stares at a rock must have a lot on his mind... or nothing at all'

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I think that it is a gypsum formation, but still a wonderful specimen. :)

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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Can we see some more pics, Astrinos?

I would not have thought selenite crystals would bunch up in such a regular way.. none of the ones I have seen do, but there is always something new to learn...

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It's very nice looking, but I believe it is a mineral deposit.

"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes

"can't we all just get along?" Jack Nicholson from Mars Attacks

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Eric, Herb. grampa dino,

Thanks very much for your inputs ;)

Eric,

As I have quoted above, I have no more elements of the item available. Though, I searced In my files and found two samples that I think bear some similarities to the above item. The first one includes nice selenite ''pine cone petals'' and the second one is sectional like this but less regularly formed.

The specimen in discussion reminds of a pine cone by the first view, but I think that an in detail comparison indicates that it doesn't matches that much.

The regular way of some formations during the mineralization process is actually amazing sometimes. ;):)

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post-4345-0-49446400-1359835444_thumb.jpg

Astrinos P. Damianakis

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I can see how the cavities are shaped like selenite xls as in your first specimen, but I'm still puzzled as to how they could arrange themselves in a cone-like pattern! :zzzzscratchchin: Notice how irregular the grouping is in both your specimens - no regularity whatsoever except in the size of the xls. Anyway I could be wrong, Nature is capable of some clever mimicry.

Edited by Wrangellian
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The empty spaces aren't the crystal formations - the thin plates between the empty spaces are the mineral deposit. The empty spaces are just where the ground matrix, being softer and not well consolidated, has weathered away.

Rich

The plural of "anecdote" is not "evidence".

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