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Shark Teeth Found In Venice, Florida


PA Fossil Finder

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I found 122 shark teeth in Florida, and if possible, I would like some help with identification. Measurement is in centimeters. Pics 1-2 Bull shark? 3 I think I heard this one called a copper shark tooth. 4 I don't know. 5 I don't know. 6-7 Maybe a sand tiger? 8-9 Tip of a mako or great white? I have more pictures but they won't fit in this post.

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Stephen

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More pictures. 10-11 I think this is a worn, broken tiger shark tooth. 12-13 Another tiger someone gave me. 14 ? 15 A very long sand tiger? 16 and 17 I don't know. 18-19 I thought this one was really cool because of the size of the serrations. 20 Requiem shark tooth?

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Stephen

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Even more pictures. Pic 21 I have no idea. 22 ? 23-24 Is that white stuff enamel that didn't get damaged by fossilization? 25 One of my smallest teeth. 26 Some kind of requiem shark. 27 Another requiem shark. 28-29 I don't know. 30-31 I don't know.

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Stephen

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Last pictures (whew!). 32 and 33 I don't know what these are. The last picture is of all my finds.

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Stephen

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Hello? Anyone there? Someone please help identify these! BTW I posted this in hopes it would move back up on the lists of unidentified fossils and more people would see it. :)

Stephen

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PA Fossil Finder- What you have is some nice teeth, however, most are broken and well worn. I will do my best. The teeth with the large serrations are what they call Hemipristis serra also nicknamed Snaggle Tooth. You have a few of them. Some of the long teeth you have appear to be Sand Shark. You do have a tiger shark but I am uncertain of which species. You may have some Lemon Shark but it is really hard to tell. I suggest that you really look on the internet or search this forum for the various types of shark teeth. I have learned a lot from this website. Keep looking and you will find good quality teeth!

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I did look on the internet before posting this, but I couldn't find anything that really helped identify these. So, I turned to the forum in hopes that someone would recognize these.

Stephen

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It's a lot of teeth, all at once; this, with their worn condition, makes for a daunting ID task. My guess is that the shark tooth wizzards that have come across the topic couldn't devote the time to do the task justice right away. By my count, there are presented 38 teeth; try posting a few at a time, numbered to make the job easier. :)

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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How should I do that? Post one at a time? Then I will have a huge string of related posts that are about the same group of fossils! I only posted 23 different shark teeth, most I posted in pairs are the same tooth but pictured at different angles. I only took pictures of the teeth that were less worn and the teeth that looked unusual. So, what should I do?

Stephen

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I think what auspex means is actually NUMBERED. so if someone can ID one, they can say, "number 5 is..." Would help! :) I don't think they all have to be posted separately.

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PA Fossil Finder, in all honesty most of the teeth you found are to well worn and or broken to give a proper ID. The few that I would be willing to try are (counting your pics, left to right, top to bottom)

1&2 - possible Carcharhinus leucas lower tooth

3 - Carcharhinus sp. lower tooth

4 - possible Carcharhinus obscurus lower tooth

5 - ? Negaprion ?

6 & 7 - some type of well worn sand tiger probably Carcharias

8 & 9 - broken worn tip of Great White

14 - Galeocerdo aduncus

19 & 20 - very worn Hemipristis serra

33 - worn Carcharhinus leucas upper

numbers 10,11,12,13,15,16,17,18,21 through 32 and 34 are to worn to consider trying to ID

Bulldozers and dirt Bulldozers and dirt
behind the trailer, my desert
Them red clay piles are heaven on earth
I get my rocks off, bulldozers and dirt

Patterson Hood; Drive-By Truckers

 

image.png.0c956e87cee523facebb6947cb34e842.png May 2016  MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png.a47e14d65deb3f8b242019b3a81d8160.png.b42a25e3438348310ba19ce6852f50c1.png May 2012 IPFOTM5.png.fb4f2a268e315c58c5980ed865b39e1f.png.1721b8912c45105152ac70b0ae8303c3.png.2b6263683ee32421d97e7fa481bd418a.pngAug 2013, May 2016, Apr 2020 VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png.af5065d0585e85f4accd8b291bf0cc2e.png.72a83362710033c9bdc8510be7454b66.png.9171036128e7f95de57b6a0f03c491da.png Oct 2022

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Are any of the things I found uncommon in Florida? Because since I probably won't be going back to Florida soon, I would like something interesting to show for on my first trip! :D (I can't wait to try diving sometime though!)

Stephen

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all of these teeth are very common

Bulldozers and dirt Bulldozers and dirt
behind the trailer, my desert
Them red clay piles are heaven on earth
I get my rocks off, bulldozers and dirt

Patterson Hood; Drive-By Truckers

 

image.png.0c956e87cee523facebb6947cb34e842.png May 2016  MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png.a47e14d65deb3f8b242019b3a81d8160.png.b42a25e3438348310ba19ce6852f50c1.png May 2012 IPFOTM5.png.fb4f2a268e315c58c5980ed865b39e1f.png.1721b8912c45105152ac70b0ae8303c3.png.2b6263683ee32421d97e7fa481bd418a.pngAug 2013, May 2016, Apr 2020 VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png.af5065d0585e85f4accd8b291bf0cc2e.png.72a83362710033c9bdc8510be7454b66.png.9171036128e7f95de57b6a0f03c491da.png Oct 2022

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Oh. Darn. :( I thought great whites were rare in Florida. Just gonna have to try next time! :)

Stephen

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Yes, I guess for Fla GW's are not common. It would be much better if it were the entire tooth.

EDIT: after looking at the tooth in question again, the thickness of it is making me question the Great White ID. Tis is one of the problems with trying to ID partial and very worn teeth. I am now wondering if it may be the broken tip of a megalodon or a Carcharhinus species.

Bulldozers and dirt Bulldozers and dirt
behind the trailer, my desert
Them red clay piles are heaven on earth
I get my rocks off, bulldozers and dirt

Patterson Hood; Drive-By Truckers

 

image.png.0c956e87cee523facebb6947cb34e842.png May 2016  MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png.a47e14d65deb3f8b242019b3a81d8160.png.b42a25e3438348310ba19ce6852f50c1.png May 2012 IPFOTM5.png.fb4f2a268e315c58c5980ed865b39e1f.png.1721b8912c45105152ac70b0ae8303c3.png.2b6263683ee32421d97e7fa481bd418a.pngAug 2013, May 2016, Apr 2020 VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png.af5065d0585e85f4accd8b291bf0cc2e.png.72a83362710033c9bdc8510be7454b66.png.9171036128e7f95de57b6a0f03c491da.png Oct 2022

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It will just give you can excuse to go back sooner.... ;) Beach finds are fun and that is how I found this group. Had some shark teeth I wanted to get ID'd. Like yours mine were pretty worn and hard to identify. I can't wait to go back and find more. :)

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It will just give you can excuse to go back sooner.... ;) Beach finds are fun and that is how I found this group. Had some shark teeth I wanted to get ID'd. Like yours mine were pretty worn and hard to identify. I can't wait to go back and find more. :)

No doubt spending time at the beach is fun, especially when you have to travel to spend the time there. However, there are many, many much better places in Florida; and throughout the entire southeast for that matter for finding shark teeth. Especially if you want to find teeth that are in more pristine condition.

But keeping it fun is what is important.

Bulldozers and dirt Bulldozers and dirt
behind the trailer, my desert
Them red clay piles are heaven on earth
I get my rocks off, bulldozers and dirt

Patterson Hood; Drive-By Truckers

 

image.png.0c956e87cee523facebb6947cb34e842.png May 2016  MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png.a47e14d65deb3f8b242019b3a81d8160.png.b42a25e3438348310ba19ce6852f50c1.png May 2012 IPFOTM5.png.fb4f2a268e315c58c5980ed865b39e1f.png.1721b8912c45105152ac70b0ae8303c3.png.2b6263683ee32421d97e7fa481bd418a.pngAug 2013, May 2016, Apr 2020 VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png.af5065d0585e85f4accd8b291bf0cc2e.png.72a83362710033c9bdc8510be7454b66.png.9171036128e7f95de57b6a0f03c491da.png Oct 2022

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It isn't that that thick. It is only two or three millimeters thick at the widest point, and twelve millimeters long. And what sort of places are better for finding teeth? (Without having to dive, of course!)

Stephen

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