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A Question For Paleoichthyologists


Sinopaleus

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It's almost midnight here, and I have this question stuck in my head... I would like to hear some opinions from my fellow forum Paleoichthyologists :)

Yunnan province of China is a treasure trove for Devonian Fish, with Galeaspids, Sarcopterygians and Placoderms as some of the more common fish. Based on fossils of giant fangs, we hypothesis that there is a particularly gigantic sarcopterygian fish that once lived in what is now Wuding, Yunnan. At first, we hypothesized that these fangs belonged to Psarolepis romeri, a basal sarcopterygian with large parasymphyseal fangs at the tip of it's snout. But Psarolepis romeri lived during the Early Devonian period of Qujing, almost 200 km away from Wuding. The formation where the fangs come from are dated to the Middle Devonian period, with a common occurrence of Bothriolepis sinensis. But the only known sarcopterygian in the area is Thursius wudingensis, an Osteolepidid Osteolepiform. Thursius wudingensis is a small fish, with the entire mandible just a few short centimeters long. The teeth are even smaller. (here's the link to the paper: http://file.lw23.com/3/3e/3e9/3e942282-a731-4d2a-867f-b64127eb8db4.pdf) So what fish could bear such great teeth? Could it be a yet undescribed species of lobe-finned fish? Apparently, Thursius wudingensis descended from the great Youngolepis praecursur, a giant, meter-long basal sarcopterygian that lived with Psarolepis in the Early Devonian of Qujing. If there is a possibility that like T. wudingensis, this fish was descended from a fish from an earlier epoch in Qujing, could it be a descendant of the fanged Psarolepis, but grew to much larger proportions? All in all, One of China's leading paleoichthyologists situated in Beijing's IVPP (Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology), Prof. Zhu Min, only gave us details that this is a an early form of hard-boned lobe-finned fish. He's quite hard to reach, so we weren't able to reach him recently. That's why I am currently asking my forum friends for help. All opinions are appreciated!

I have acquired permission for displaying these photos of the fangs from their owner, so you can see a variety of these fangs. B)

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Here are my own fangs.

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SP

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Fossil fish from the Middle Devonian of New York are rare and I would freak if I found a tooth (fang) like that. In all my years I only found a skull to an early bony fish and some Placoderm armor. I would guess your formation is fresh or brackish waters. Can't help but thanks for the photos!

Mikey

Many times I've wondered how much there is to know.  
led zeppelin

 

MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png PaleoPartner.png.30c01982e09b0cc0b7d9d6a7a21f56c6.png IPFOTM.png IPFOTM2.png IPFOTM3.png IPFOTM4.png IPFOTM5.png

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Fossil fish from the Middle Devonian of New York are rare and I would freak if I found a tooth (fang) like that. In all my years I only found a skull to an early bony fish and some Placoderm armor. I would guess your formation is fresh or brackish waters. Can't help but thanks for the photos!

Mikey

Since Bothriolepis is a freshwater antiarch, I agree with you. :) Bony fish as in ray-finned fish?

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That's what I have been told. Here is a photo of the skull and sorry, the photo isn't that good. The other photo is of some Placoderm armor that I found at my Upper Devonian cephalopod site.

Mikey

Actinopterygian sp.

Early bony fish skull

Upper Devonian, Geneseo Black Shale

Livingston County, New York

Placoderm

5"

Upper Devonian, Hatch fm.

Ontario County, New York

post-7129-0-83110500-1364375591_thumb.jpg

post-7129-0-49086700-1364375602_thumb.jpg

Many times I've wondered how much there is to know.  
led zeppelin

 

MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png PaleoPartner.png.30c01982e09b0cc0b7d9d6a7a21f56c6.png IPFOTM.png IPFOTM2.png IPFOTM3.png IPFOTM4.png IPFOTM5.png

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Something like Onychodus? It was deep-water marine, but it had the teeth for it...

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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Something like Onychodus? It was deep-water marine, but it had the teeth for it...

Yes, Psarolepis is an Onychodontiform, related to Onychodus. :)

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That's what I have been told. Here is a photo of the skull and sorry, the photo isn't that good. The other photo is of some Placoderm armor that I found at my Upper Devonian cephalopod site.

Mikey

Actinopterygian sp.

Early bony fish skull

Upper Devonian, Geneseo Black Shale

Livingston County, New York

Placoderm

5"

Upper Devonian, Hatch fm.

Ontario County, New York

That's pretty awesome B) Thanks for showing!

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