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Mineral Id - Might Contain Gold...


Clayton Jones

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A coworker's husband found a few rocks somewhere in Colorado near some gold mines. The rocks contain tiny specks of a metallic mineral. It has a reddish-gold color and has a streak of the same color.

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I originally thought that it might be pyrite until I actually saw it and it had a reddish color, then I thought it might have some copper in there because of the red color, but my coworker's husband thinks there's gold in there because he found it near a gold mine. I've heard of copper and gold forming together, but never pyrite and copper.

Any ideas on what this is?

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My attempt at creating a museum and community center to help people find an interest in the world around them.

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If the streak is not black, then it is not pyrite (even in part). Were it cinnabar (another candidate), the streak would be scarlet.

Is it malleable? If not, is it hard, or soft?

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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If I remember correctly, pyrite often contains tiny amounts of gold. I just thought that was pretty neat. I think it does form with copper.

Stephen

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One of the distinguishing features of gold is that it is always bright yellow. Not reddish. The Black Hills Gold which they make into jewelry featurig green, red and gold gold is man made by mixing copper for one color and something else to form the other color. Native gold is yellow and shiny. Take your specimen out in the sun and watch it shine, then put in in the shade; if it still shines, it is gold. If not it is probably pyrite. I did this a lot in my short career (two days) as a gold panner. It works.

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It could be chalcopyrite which has the reddish copper and pyrite colors. It too is found with quartz as is gold.

Jim

Old Dead Things

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Gold has a yellow streak. This is probably chalcopyrite (also called peacock ore by some) .

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When I scratched it in the back of a piece of tile (the little picture in the middle of the image I posted), the chunk fell apart a little, so it might be brittle but, there wasn't very much of the mineral in the rock at all so I can't be sure.

WhVUieh.png
My attempt at creating a museum and community center to help people find an interest in the world around them.

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gold is very soft and would probably be squished by a scratch test, rather than fall apart brittley. Is that a word...brittley?

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Thanks for the replies everyone! Now my coworker has the fun job of convincing her husband that there probably isn't any gold in his rock :D

WhVUieh.png
My attempt at creating a museum and community center to help people find an interest in the world around them.

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To tell gold from pyrite:

If it is gold, you should be able to make a hole in it with a pin (soft metal), while in pyrite nothing would happen.

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