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How To Make Fossil Jewelry Wire Wrapping--No Fossils Harmed!


Bev

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Please let me preface this with, I AM NO EXPERT! I have never made jewelry before. I've had two strokes so I'm not particularly dexterous--the old grey mare ain't what she used to be. :) I was looking for a way to display the fossils that I have found rather than leave them in a box or outside in the weather. I have a lot of small fossils. And in trading I acquired some teeth and other fossils. I wear my jewelry and I give it as gifts to family and friends. And I accidently discovered that when I substitute teach the fossils draw the interest of the children to science!

This is a great craft for youth involved in fossiling. You can acquire your beads and baubles inexpensively at rummage sales, etc. by cutting up costume jewelry necklaces. Or you can buy kits at stores. SUPER mother-daughter hobby! Absolutely terrific personalized gift to your lover! And guys, you can do this too!

This is a super simple tutorial how-to on how make jewelry WITHOUT harming the fossils!

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Wire is your basic component. Most wire here in the US at a hobby shop like Michael's or Hobby Lobby is like $3-$5 a roll. These are just examples of colors I have on hand. I like the copper, silver and black for most fossils. You can get aluminum wire in red, pink, etc.

I use almost exclusively 24 an 26 gauge wire. For some of the bigger, heavier jewelry fossils I use 20 gauge. The lower the number the heavier the wire and more difficult to bend.

Triangular shaped fossils like teeth are the easiest to wrap.

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Front and back views. Two ways to do teeth. With the little leaf clip I use super glue on each side to secure it.

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Here is a Velosiraptor replica claw that I wrapped and thought would attract the attention of the boys in class--I teach elementary and middle school. My preferance for wrapping triangles is the two strand method. :) Pretty self-explanatory, I think.

I use anything from leather cords, to ribbon, to chain, to metal "collars" for the hangers/necklaces. I haven't played too much with beading the necklaces yet because I'm focussed on the pendants with the fossils.

And, if you go to YouTube and typein Wire Wrap Jewelry there are some nice short videos on the subject!

Please be patient, this will take at least one reply, but I've tried to condense it as much as possible.

Edited by Bev
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On top are the only three tools I use. On the bottom are two spools of wire in case you wanted to see the labels. On either side and at the top are examples of fossils I've already wrapped.

In the middle is the leaf fossil I bought yesterday at the MAPS Expo. It is about 3 inches tall by maybe 2 inches wide. I think the picture is pretty self explanatory. I don't want to insult your intelligence. :)

3 strands of wire cut longer than I would need to go around the fossil. I wrapped wire in three places (or you could use beads at those spots). I am creating a "basket" to set the fossil into. Note: This is the thinnest fossil I have ever wrapped and I am running out of beads and will not go up to a city again for maybe a couple of weeks. So I will probably rewrap it when I get more beads.

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So, the fern pendant in the middle is the final product. I stuck two pieces of wire up through the red bead--I like red and black. :) Took the loose ends and wrapped under the bead, brought them around to the front, put a bead on them and used that rounded pliers to make a curl to keep the bead on. The wire that came through the top bead I grabbed with the plastic ended pliers and twisted the wire, nipped it to create an even end, and rolled it to create a bail (bale?) for the necklace to slip through. I think I will eventually add more beads to the sides and something to dangle off the bottom. This took about 20 minutes. The beads and wire cost less than $2 (the pretty red beads are pricey) and the fossil cost me $2 at MAPS. I can pair it with pretty much any necklace. Or I like those collars like on the horn coral in the top left of the pic because I just slip different pendants on and off at will. You can get those at the hobby shop as well. Usually under $5 on sale for a pack of 2 or 3.

So around it I have shown other pieces I have made including crinoid earrings, and a crinoid (with rhinestone in middle) and gastropod rings (which you can also buy the base rings at the hobby shop, I like adjustable ones).

post-9628-0-04896700-1365362896_thumb.jpg post-9628-0-30943100-1365362951_thumb.jpg First blastoid wrap and it worked!

The croids pendant is much prettier than it shows on this picture, just stunning really. :)

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Oh, and here is a copper wrapped tooth I should have put in the above post.

I hope this inspires you to take those small fossils out of the boxes, wear them and introduce others to the fun of fossiling! The nice thing is that this is so easy and inexpensive that you can redo your fossils at will when you get tired of the current look! A recycling of history, science, and fun!

Questions? Just ask!

Oh, if you think I did a fairly good job of explaining this and think it is good information, please hit the informative button on the side so that I know. :)

Bev :)

Edited by Bev
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The more I learn, I realize the less I know.

:wacko:
 
 

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Thanks for sharing. I bought some 24 gauge wire this weekend while shopping with my wife. I have a few teeth that I would like to to turn into pendants.

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Wonderful Kirk! You'll have to share pictures of them when you have them wire up! It was good timing for you.

Bev :)

The more I learn, I realize the less I know.

:wacko:
 
 

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Oh, I should mention that if your fossils are a bit fragile (lots of mine are limestone and inclined toward breaking) OR they are not smooth to the touch on a person's skin, I coat mine with Modpodge! It is a water soluable adhesive and coating product in one shot. Comes both in matte and gloss finishes. Matte is nice on the limestone and the gloss is great on the brachs and bivalves. If the fossils are starting to break apart a little, this adheres them together. You can do multiple coats.

Also, modpodge is used for decoupage. So you can put the name of the fossil on the back and coat it with modpodge for a "permanent" id, as long as you don't immerse it in water for a period of time!

Hope this helps!

Bev :)

The more I learn, I realize the less I know.

:wacko:
 
 

Go to my

Gallery for images of Fossil Jewelry, Sculpture & Crafts
 

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