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Fossil Or Geological From Ash Grove Quarry - Tx


gturner333

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I found 2 of these odd objects (one is 2a&b and the other is 4a&b and am trying to determine if they are fossil or geological. One of them looks like a couple of Pycnodont teeth stuck together. Not sure about the other. Ash Grove is upper Cretaceous, Coniacian, Basal Atco Formation of Austin Group at Midlothian, TX. The scale is 1mm.

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post-11358-0-55637700-1394312286_thumb.jpg

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post-11358-0-21024400-1394312291_thumb.jpg

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I keep hoping someone will recognize these. They may just be geologic but they're vaguely familiar. I'm stumped.

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They almost look like moth and/or butterfly cocoons.....

I don't know......but they definitely look organic to me.

~Charlie~

"There are those that look at things the way they are, and ask why.....i dream of things that never were, and ask why not?" ~RFK
->Get your Mosasaur print
->How to spot a fake Trilobite
->How to identify a CONCRETION from a DINOSAUR EGG

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Can you tell if they're phosphatic? Pyritic?

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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They seem phosphatic like the nodules, teeth, and verts that are so common to this area. It isn't anything recent.

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I wonder whether they mightn't be fancy phosphate nodules?

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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We have things much like this in the Cretaceous of NJ. Ours are the infilled drill holes of clams that bored into the thick-shelled contemporary oysters. The layering seen on the surface is a mold of the layers of the oyster shell that were drilled through. That's my best guess for your specimen. The one thing that doesn't fit is that yours seems to show a sinuous trail. This would rule out a clam but it still could easily be the tunnel of some other shell-drilling invertebrate.

Edited by Carl
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