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Cow Shark Teeth


eddie

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Let's see some cow shark teeth!

Here are mine. Not a lot, but a variety of locations and species.

IMG_9601_zps06476747.jpg

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wow.... i mean, moo...

I'm CRAZY about amber fossils and just as CRAZY in general.

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Those are one of the species I wish we had more of here. I've only ever found one and it was a partial :(

Every once in a great while it's not just a big rock down there!

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Those are one of the species I wish we had more of here. I've only ever found one and it was a partial :(

Jeff,

Check out FOTM on page #4: http://www.fcolc.com/newsletters/news1013.pdf

Edited by Shellseeker

The White Queen  ".... in her youth she could believe "six impossible things before breakfast"

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tried to look Jack but it seems the link isn't working :(

Works fine on this end. Nice article.

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Cow shark is one of the most interesting teeth there is. Your collection shows why. Congratulations!

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Beautiful cowsharks!!!

Bulldozers and dirt Bulldozers and dirt
behind the trailer, my desert
Them red clay piles are heaven on earth
I get my rocks off, bulldozers and dirt

Patterson Hood; Drive-By Truckers

 

image.png.0c956e87cee523facebb6947cb34e842.png May 2016  MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png.a47e14d65deb3f8b242019b3a81d8160.png.b42a25e3438348310ba19ce6852f50c1.png May 2012 IPFOTM5.png.fb4f2a268e315c58c5980ed865b39e1f.png.1721b8912c45105152ac70b0ae8303c3.png.2b6263683ee32421d97e7fa481bd418a.pngAug 2013, May 2016, Apr 2020 VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png.af5065d0585e85f4accd8b291bf0cc2e.png.72a83362710033c9bdc8510be7454b66.png.9171036128e7f95de57b6a0f03c491da.png Oct 2022

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Thanks everyone. The top two teeth in the middle column are H. gigas from Chile. The bottom tooth is a N. loozi from Morocco.

The trio on the bottom right are from the Netherlands. The upper/lower pair on the lower left are, I believe, Hexanchus from Lee Creek, which are pretty rare.

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  • 1 month later...

I've said it before and I'll say it again... the guy with the nicest private cowshark tooth collection I know of and certainly one of the nicest in the world has got to be Daryl aka cowsharks on this board.

Attached Thumbnails
  • cowshark_collection.JPG
  • cow_symphyseal_large.jpg
  • cowsharks_2005.jpg
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I love the syphyseals! I just found my first cowshark tooth a few days ago. Guess i have a long way to go to catch up....haha

Nice collections guys!

~Charlie~

"There are those that look at things the way they are, and ask why.....i dream of things that never were, and ask why not?" ~RFK
->Get your Mosasaur print
->How to spot a fake Trilobite
->How to identify a CONCRETION from a DINOSAUR EGG

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I've said it before and I'll say it again... the guy with the nicest private cowshark tooth collection I know of and certainly one of the nicest in the world has got to be Daryl aka cowsharks on this board.

Attached Thumbnails
  • cowshark_collection.JPG
  • cow_symphyseal_large.jpg
  • cowsharks_2005.jpg

Thanks Jason. I've been truly blessed to find so many of my favorite shark tooth! Last time I checked I filled up a third riker display case like the one you posted, and am working on a fourth one.

When I first started collecting back in 1996, a fellow collector friend showed me his collection of cowshark teeth; it numbered around 100 specimens and was comprised of uppers, lowers, and symphyseals. I remember telling him that day that my goal was to one day have as many cowshark teeth in my collection :) For me though, it really isn't about how many, but rather a fascination with how unique these particular teeth are, how each position is different from the next. Fortunately, my favorite tooth happens to be a bit more common than some of the super rare shark teeth out there.

Daryl.

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Shellseeker,

Thanks for the link. That is a very interesting tooth. I think I've seen only two cow shark teeth from Florida - both from Bone Valley - and think they were Notorynchus (not sure). The FOTM article notes that it was thought that Hexanchus is rare in Florida because it is and apparently has been a deepwater shark (could have been what helped it survive the K/T extinction). It's true that adults frequent deeper waters but juveniles come into shallow water and adults may come close to shore occasionally. I think the main reason you don't Hexanchus in Florida, fossil or not, is that it is a cold-temperate shark. It's just been too warm for it there except maybe for some cooler-than-normal winters or certain phases of the late Miocene-Pleistocene.

Jess.

Jeff,

Check out FOTM on page #4: http://www.fcolc.com/newsletters/news1013.pdf

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here are some from Antwerp. We find a lot of pieces here, but complete teeth aren't common.

greetz

Aaron

post-12517-0-42711300-1399193667_thumb.jpgpost-12517-0-66137600-1399193686_thumb.jpgpost-12517-0-11200000-1399193696_thumb.jpgpost-12517-0-42986700-1399193730_thumb.jpgpost-12517-0-44429000-1399193745_thumb.jpg

Nullus finis longius si quod facis delectaris

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Great teeth everyone! And what an amazing collection you have Daryl!!! :)

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Those are great teeth but somebody messed up when they named that shark....those chompers ain't designed for grazing! ;)

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Shellseeker,

Thanks for the link. That is a very interesting tooth. I think I've seen only two cow shark teeth from Florida - both from Bone Valley - and think they were Notorynchus (not sure). The FOTM article notes that it was thought that Hexanchus is rare in Florida because it is and apparently has been a deepwater shark (could have been what helped it survive the K/T extinction). It's true that adults frequent deeper waters but juveniles come into shallow water and adults may come close to shore occasionally. I think the main reason you don't Hexanchus in Florida, fossil or not, is that it is a cold-temperate shark. It's just been too warm for it there except maybe for some cooler-than-normal winters or certain phases of the late Miocene-Pleistocene.

Jess.

Bone Valley Teeth -

post-3033-0-57381100-1399232887_thumb.jp

MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png  November, 2016  PaleoPartner.png.30c01982e09b0cc0b7d9d6a7a21f56c6.png.a600039856933851eeea617ca3f2d15f.png   April, 2019

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Wow Gizmo, I am impressed. Cow shark teeth are very very rare in the Peace River. In more than 5 years of hunting, I have found exactly 1.

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/gallery/image/17409-notorhynchus-primigenius-18mm/

The White Queen  ".... in her youth she could believe "six impossible things before breakfast"

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Gizmo,

Like Shellseeker, I am truly amazed at how many you have. I know one longtime Bone Valley collector who has exactly two specimens and that collector hunted at least back to the 80's, not counting purchases made focusing on rarities like that. I'm not sure even Gordon Hubbell has half that many as I try to recall the Bone Valley display in his museum.

Did you collect those during the old days (pre-2000's) when you could hunt the mines and/or have you been buying/trading for every one you see?

Jess

Bone Valley Teeth -

attachicon.gifphoto-63.JPG

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