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Any Tips For The Isle Of Sheppey?


TheFossilFinder

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I'm heading over to Sheppey tomorrow and I hope to find some good fossils. I need to know where to look, and what kind of teeth, bones ect. to look for. I will follow up with some pictures of my finds when I get back tommorow.

Cheers,

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Does this help? LINK

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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Good luck! :)

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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Look through the shingle for the teeth. Sheppey is a bit of a hit or miss at the moment as the conditions are unpredictable. Good luck.

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Bit late, but my advice is to take something to kneel on. It gets cold and wet and the knees suffer if you are looking through the small stuff and don't bring back too much wood, it isn't stable. Apart from that you'll need Fred's website to identify anything if you haven't bought his book. http://www.sheppeyfossils.com/ Don't expect anything spectacular, it hasn't been too good down there recently, but you should get something. The car park at Warden Bay is free and fairly easy to find. Just remember you have to get back to it.

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I came back with some interesting finds, including some sort of animal bone I found washed up on the beach!

post-14437-0-06728400-1395594749_thumb.jpg

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cool, but your picture is way out of focus. Can you reshoot?

Also, I would like to know what you regulars out there do to stabilize those pyrite Sheppey fossils...

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You can't properly stabilise Sheppey fossils :( , but it's only really the plant material that is not stable. Even then sometimes it stays stable for years if you keep it dry. My favourite way of checking if something is a piece of wood or a bone fragment (some small pieces are difficult to tell apart) is to leave it for a year in a damp place. If it is still there after a year it is probably bone. Keeping things in oil helps but it only slows down the inevitable decay. My record for the rot to set in with wood is 2 days and so far no sign of decay in the gastropods, brachiopods, bivalves or any of the other pyrite fossils and some of them were collected 30 years ago. I have worked with 19th century collections and it seems like only the plants suffer, I've seen shellac, varnish, oil and other substances used to try and stop the decay, but so far I've not seen anything that looks like a real solution.

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