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Demand For Groundwater Causing Huge Swaths Of Land To Sink


mikecable

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... drought or too many humans?

Yes.

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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This is no different from the withdrawing of petroleum from underground... Something will have to happen to the open pore space in the rock formations to fill what has been removed.

Give California some time. This area was at one time an Inland Ocean... once it sinks the value of real estate and ocean views will sky rocket. At least that is a positive.

It is odd that this occurs when there is a big battle between Los Angeles and the Farmers on this water supply. You would think Los Angeles would desalinate the water next to them, the Pacific Ocean and raise the price per gallon to those taking two showers a day and watering their lawns. The discussing about building dams and diverting water that is now running into the Pacific Ocean from northern California is blocked by environmentalists... who take two showers a day and water their lawns.

When the bread basket of California dries up... then there will an outcry for food.

We are on well water at my home and we are very conservative how we use it. We get Out of Staters who bring in "hobby" horses and a mind set that this water comes out of the ground without limit. You try to explain to them that when the water level drops... and your recharge of underground water is less than its use... your home will no longer be an asset and you are prohibited to use the water off of your roof into the gutters and into barrels as it is "not your water, as someone else owns the water surface rights".

Water is more precious than most people think. Yet, conservation from the Water Suppliers is not practiced as it cuts into their covering salaries and overhead. They should price water for what it takes to make people to want to conserve.

There... I said my piece and do not need a video or National Geographic to say one word to a family that understand how valuable our GROUND WATER will be in the future!

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John Wesley Powell understood that water management was the key to sustainable settlement of the West; he wrote a book about it that still rings true today, but it was ignored in society's rush to profit from the new, vast, "limitless" frontier. The harsh lesson is not yet learned, but the awakening has at long last begun. When the metered cost of water has risen to its true value, municipal desalinization will be feasible, and water consumption will decrease drastically. It won't be fun, but it will happen.

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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One of the best ways to teach humans the value of their basic needs

And the effort required to fulfill those needs is to take them backpacking.

Just not on my trails. Haha

It's hard to remember why you drained the swamp when your surrounded by alligators.

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We are on well water at my home and we are very conservative how we use it. We get Out of Staters who bring in "hobby" horses and a mind set that this water comes out of the ground without limit. You try to explain to them that when the water level drops... and your recharge of underground water is less than its use... your home will no longer be an asset and you are prohibited to use the water off of your roof into the gutters and into barrels as it is "not your water, as someone else owns the water surface rights".

Any citation on this? I agree that if I capture the surface water before it hits ground level that I'm depriving those downstream of water. But if you follow that argument, if I pull up the parking lots, or plant native grasses, I'm preventing those downstream from the full benefits of my run-off.

I agree with most of what you say. It comes down to not enough water. Which comes down to a fight. And I'm an anarcho-communist, bleeding heart liberal, tree-hugging, libertarian old drifter dude. Who comes from Texas, and owns guns. I'll trade folks guns for water rights any day. But I need some guns I've held back to protect my deal. Welcome to the next great extinction. B)

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"Any citation on this? I agree that if I capture the surface water before it hits ground level that I'm depriving those downstream of water. But if you follow that argument, if I pull up the parking lots, or plant native grasses, I'm preventing those downstream from the full benefits of my run-off."

Douglas County Commissioner, Colorado during a neighborhood annual meeting with the Roxborough Water and Sanitation District meeting where they were going to join the Aurora, Colorado water district.

***********

"Tree hugger" in central west Texas? Midland, Odessa? You meant tall bushes, not trees. Spent nearly five months flying Army helicopters near Mineral Wells, Texas... which had a few trees to admire.

You may know that people in the Middle East will go on a vacation to the Tropics where they can experience RAIN. Torrential rain and enjoy every moment!

Colorado, Wyoming, western Kansas and western Nebraska has some of the best underground water you can drink in the Ogallala Aquifer.

Our ground water is within sediments that are post Cretaceous terrestrial sediments from the early Rocky Mountains, so it is filtered naturally and usually with no after taste. Our well water has a pH of 6.5 so a bit acidic, so we have a neutralizer and water softner to make it perfect for us. We have rights to One Acre Foot a year of this 55 degree (cold water) which is over 325,000 gallons! We also have water rights deeper just above the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary. That was one reason why this part of the Denver Basin was appealing to us. Water, water and water.

There could be some radioactivity in solution, but that is because the Rocky Mountains also have background radioactivity. Probably no more than the concrete basements in Missouri...

After the Y2K, 2000 scare the plastic 42 gallon barrels were being sold at garage sales for a couple bucks. I bought two barrels, hooked up bypasses on my down spouts and when they filled up, a bypass to flow into our scrub Oak bushes. This rain water was used to water the two Blue Heelers and outside rock garden. Crazy written water law with unexpected side effects.

Ground water rights and Surface water rights are different. When California "helped write the water law" concerning the Colorado River, Colorado was a low populated State, as was Utah and Arizona. I have a collection of US Geological Survey Water Supply papers from their beginning and will eventually start selling those on the internet. I would think that they are available on the internet as an Efile, but the maps are the part that cannot be easily copied on a small screen.

I would go rabbit hunting at 7 years old with a Remington pump 22 long rifle. Still have it and lack no safety precautions when we camp a week or two in the back country. Just a different generation.

Of course... the cities of the Front Range are very interested in other people's water.

You know, this has little to do with Paleontology... maybe if it is brought up that my well water is probably from the melting of the last Ice Age here in the Colorado Rockies! Fossil Water!

Although I have yet to find a vertebrate fossil in the Dawson Formation... there are coal seams near the Cretaceous boundary and most likely some plant fossils. We need another 500 to 600 feet to go for an accurate answer. Maybe ask the future owners in Y3K.

Edited by Ray Eklund
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At my Camp on the Allegheny Plateau, we have a nice spring. From that spring we dip and carry every drop of water we use; cooking, washing, a dollop with the single-malt...this tends to make us pretty miserly with it (the water, not the scotch). Likewise the firewood (the acquisition of which requires more invested effort than the water). It is a contemplative way to experience life, and I live for every opportunity.

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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We have a 23 foot trailer we "rough it" in the back country. You do learn how to conserve water. We watch the water gauge very closely. Showers? Only if it is your birthday on an even year. I can "shower" in less water than the dogs will drink in a day. This also carries over to living at home... a house without wheels.

Friends... or former camping friends... learn the hard way and run out of water in a few days and have to drive 140 miles round trip to empty their gray and black water tanks and refill their fresh water. We use the shovel method. Water is to drink and wash "some" dishes... which now are paper plates that need no washing and only cooking utensils.

It helps by carrying four water jugs, empty, until going into the back country to set up camp. We will shower ONLY when we are packed and leaving to move to another site... if we are going past a Forest Service office to refill our water and dump our trash.

Kids... should get a taste of their eccentric "grand parents" cruel camping methods. For a treat... when near a nice clear flowing creek... toss the little tykes into the 58 degree water to "freshen up"... with the two Blue Heelers. They all can use a washing after a week or two in the dust and arid climates.

We felt we deserved going from tent camping to a home on wheels in 2006 and love the refrigerator the most! Sometimes getting old has its benefits. This sure is one...now if there were some good rock, mineral and fossil locations that are new to us... we would have it made.

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My Dad was in the Coast Guard and he lives by the 2 minuet shower to this day. Efficient but not pleasant.

I know the west has severe water problems. I could never understand the nuclear plant on the coast

and not one desalination plant. I lived in Delmar, Ca. in the late 80's and the water company had to supply

us with bottle water for 3 months due to bacteria. We found out after we were all sick,

I did find some neat clams and gastropods around Lake Hodges reservoir.

A Fossil to me, then, was probably close to myself today :P

It's hard to remember why you drained the swamp when your surrounded by alligators.

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