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Pine Cone Or Coral? Neither?


CKC3

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Bizarre! I can't reconcile what I see with either coral or cone. I assume it is heavy and stoney?

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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I don't think it is coral or a pine-cone. It might be an algae, some of them have that stack of bowls morphology. It also bears some resemblance to the ichnofossil Teichichnus, but I do not know if those are lithified enough to weather out of matrix intact.

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Not pine cone.I would like to see more pictures, particularly from the end showing on the right.

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What age are the rocks where you found this?

Mississippian or Pensylvanian. I'm not sure exactly, but I'll post a pic of a few fossils that I found nearby. Thanks.

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looks like a mineral deposit to me, stalactite\stalagmite maybe

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"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes

"can't we all just get along?" Jack Nicholson from Mars Attacks

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Hello,

This looks like a peculiar and unique structure called a "cone-in-cone", although some more photos (maybe with a coin or ruler or something for scale would be great) might help here.

Cone-in-cones superficially resemble many of the suggestions we've had here (and have baffled geologists since the 1700's) - when isolated they can look like pine cones but without the detail to each conical layer. They're formed by layers of sequential crystal growth (by an unknown mechanism) in old sediments, and they have quite a heavy (dense) feel to them - often denser than a similar-sized fossil.

The internet lacks good information on them (they're quite obscure and specialist), and most publications tout an individual's particular view on how they formed, so there aren't really any useful references I can point you to, I'm afraid.

That's my best effort from that photo. Happy to be proven wrong :)

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Penn. cone-in-cone, not too similar.

post-2520-0-18412700-1395867740_thumb.jpg

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"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes

"can't we all just get along?" Jack Nicholson from Mars Attacks

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I am running out of alternatives to 'exotic gypsum crystal'.

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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Central Ohio is mainly U.Devonian to Mississippian, could be a weathered Dev. coral as TqB suggested, even though I don't see any septa. Still going with a cave- like deposit. There are caves in the surrounding area,

Edited by Herb

"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes

"can't we all just get along?" Jack Nicholson from Mars Attacks

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Search4 in their coral gallery has an interesting one could it be something like that http://www.thefossilforum.com/uploads/gallery/album_1948/gallery_4117_1948_2364566.jpg

That coral is too modern, there is no Cenozoic in Ohio, only Ordovician - Permian and areas of Pleistocene. Central Ohio is upper Paleozoic.

Edited by Herb

"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes

"can't we all just get along?" Jack Nicholson from Mars Attacks

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Central Ohio is mainly U.Devonian to Mississippian, could be a weathered Dev. coral as TqB suggested, even though I don't see any septa. Still going with a cave- like deposit. There are caves in the surrounding area,

I still suspect a cystiphylloid coral - they don't have obvious septa, just large dissepiments which can weather away to show void infills like that.

(Try searching "cystiphylloid" images for similar specimens - some reminiscent of cone-in-cone structure.)

Edited by TqB

Tarquin      image.png.b7b2dcb2ffdfe5c07423473150a7ac94.png  image.png.4828a96949a85749ee3c434f73975378.png  image.png.6354171cc9e762c1cfd2bf647445c36f.png  image.png.06d7471ec1c14daf7e161f6f50d5d717.png

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Here is a crappy picture of a top view. Still messing with my camera's macro option. Also posting a few goodies found in the immediate area.

post-14824-0-26221800-1395958954_thumb.jpg

post-14824-0-18549800-1395958980_thumb.jpg

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I think TqB is right that it is a horn coral. I think it is partially silicified and then weathered.

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I think TqB is right that it is a horn coral. I think it is partially silicified and then weathered.

The new end view puts my think bone on this track too.

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"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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after looking at the last pictures, I'm leaning toward the weathered coral now also.

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"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes

"can't we all just get along?" Jack Nicholson from Mars Attacks

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