Jump to content

What Kind Of Horn Is This...?


curious kat

Recommended Posts

Found this while walking in the forest in SW NM on a hill side near AZ. First thought when I saw it was Buffalo, but there are none here. post-13912-0-18729500-1396043520_thumb.jpg It's not rounded like a bull horn, but more flat shaped. And about how old would it be to look like that? Thanks....post-13912-0-85635800-1396043566_thumb.jpg post-13912-0-10517500-1396043603_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it is a seed pod from a plant in the Proboscidea family called dune unicorn or devils claw. From the size and location I would guess it is P. sabulosa.

Edit to add a photo. P. sabulosa

Edited by Tethys
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Could be a sheep/rams horn, they sometimes decompose like that. I've seen them get like that after about ten years of being exposed to the elements.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sun-baked keratin; probably bovine.

(Anyone need more incentive to wear sunblock?)

  • I found this Informative 1

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's ambiguous enough that there are five different plausible ID's so far, 3 animal, 2 vegetable. I think an antelope shed would be hollow? I can't tell from the photo if it is hollow or solid. Plant parts would probably float in water for an easy way to diagnose animal or vegetable.

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it is in fact a horn sheath, it is not pronghorn antelope. But remember, there are lots of exotics that are on ranches so large that they are almost free-range. If I had to guess, I'd go for Ovis canadensis - perhaps a female. Rocky Mountain Bighorn have been introduced into NM in that area.

Edited by RichW9090
  • I found this Informative 1

The plural of "anecdote" is not "evidence".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone for the possible answers. It's not plant, I know that much. We do see pronghorn but not in this forest area and it doesn't look like their type of horn. So from what I hear, it's Big Horn Sheep....exciting to know, we haven't seen any around here, only down in AZ in the rocky parts. Is it odd that they would be in the pine forest? So thank you all.... :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's one of the reintroduction areas, and why Rocky Mountain Bighorn were put there, rather than Desert Bighorn.

Edited by RichW9090
  • I found this Informative 1

The plural of "anecdote" is not "evidence".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Rich, I didn't know they were reintroduced here, is there a difference in their appearance that you know of? Are the sheep in Morenci AZ the desert ones?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They are probably Rocky Mountain. When they were introduced, there was a big controversy, with some people claiming that Rocky Mountain Bighorn never occurred there. But I identified a 1,600 year old skull from a cave along the Little Colorado River as Rocky Mountain, rather than Desert, Bighorn, providing support for the reintroduction.

  • I found this Informative 2

The plural of "anecdote" is not "evidence".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's pretty interesting that you ID that old skull Rich, congrats on that! I'll have to keep a look out for any around now, thanks for your help on this. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...