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Shells From Whiskey Bridge Matrix


lissa318

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I believe I did a fairly good job at ID'ing these... This is my first attempt with shells so please feel free to correct me if I made any mistakes! :)

1. Michela trabeatoides

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post-8801-0-62726100-1396193204_thumb.jpg

2. Latirus moorei

post-8801-0-61884000-1396193269_thumb.jpg

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3. Bonellitia Parilis

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4. Pseudoliva vetusta

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post-8801-0-81838900-1396193565_thumb.jpg

5. Hesperiturris nodocarinatus

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post-8801-0-45330900-1396193747_thumb.jpg

Thanks for looking! :)

Edited by lissa318
  • I found this Informative 1
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Lissa--Nice Texas Gastro's, must be a neat place to hunt, what do you use to ID your finds?----Tom

Grow Old Kicking And Screaming !!
"Don't Tread On Me"

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Lissa--Nice Texas Gastro's, must be a neat place to hunt, what do you use to ID your finds?----Tom

Thanks! I received a little bit of this matrix from member sixgill pete along with some Lee Creek matrix. He also sent me a 2 page PDF with common finds from that location. I was able to ID the ones above from that. There are others I am not quite sure of yet though. :)

Edited by lissa318
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Lissa,

Your ID's for No.s 1,2,and 5 are,I believe, spot on. Your ID on the Distorsio septemdentata should be in my opinion, Bonellitia parilis Palmer, 1937. The D. septemdentata has seven teeth on the inside of the outer lip. Also, the B. parilis will show two folds on the columella.

On No. 4, you are correct on the ID of the genus and specie but it is not the subspecie carinata. It is simply Pseudoliva vetusta. The Pseudoliva vetusta carinata displays an umbilicus (a central cavity of a shellformed by the walls on the inner sides of the whorls). Pseudoliva can be a confusing genus.

For my ID's I am using John and Barbara Emerson's Publication "Middle Eocene Claiborne Invertebrate Fossils from the Stone City Bluff" dated 2001 and published by the Houston Gem and Mineral Society and Bulletins ofAmerican Paleontology, Vol. 7, "Claibornian Scaphopoda,Gastropoda, and Dibranchiate Cephalopoda of the Southern United States", by K.V.w. Palmer. The Palmer publication is available on line but is so large it is difficult to manipulate.

I hope this helps.

Jim

  • I found this Informative 3

The Eocene is my favorite

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Lisa, Jim has helped me many times with ID's of Whiskey Bridge shells. I would definitely go with his ID's.

Bulldozers and dirt Bulldozers and dirt
behind the trailer, my desert
Them red clay piles are heaven on earth
I get my rocks off, bulldozers and dirt

Patterson Hood; Drive-By Truckers

 

image.png.0c956e87cee523facebb6947cb34e842.png May 2016  MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png.a47e14d65deb3f8b242019b3a81d8160.png.b42a25e3438348310ba19ce6852f50c1.png May 2012 IPFOTM5.png.fb4f2a268e315c58c5980ed865b39e1f.png.1721b8912c45105152ac70b0ae8303c3.png.2b6263683ee32421d97e7fa481bd418a.pngAug 2013, May 2016, Apr 2020 VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png.af5065d0585e85f4accd8b291bf0cc2e.png.72a83362710033c9bdc8510be7454b66.png.9171036128e7f95de57b6a0f03c491da.png Oct 2022

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Lissa,

Your ID's for No.s 1,2,and 5 are,I believe, spot on. Your ID on the Distorsio septemdentata should be in my opinion, Bonellitia parilis Palmer, 1937. The D. septemdentata has seven teeth on the inside of the outer lip. Also, the B. parilis will show two folds on the columella.

On No. 4, you are correct on the ID of the genus and specie but it is not the subspecie carinata. It is simply Pseudoliva vetusta. The Pseudoliva vetusta carinata displays an umbilicus (a central cavity of a shellformed by the walls on the inner sides of the whorls). Pseudoliva can be a confusing genus.

For my ID's I am using John and Barbara Emerson's Publication "Middle Eocene Claiborne Invertebrate Fossils from the Stone City Bluff" dated 2001 and published by the Houston Gem and Mineral Society and Bulletins ofAmerican Paleontology, Vol. 7, "Claibornian Scaphopoda,Gastropoda, and Dibranchiate Cephalopoda of the Southern United States", by K.V.w. Palmer. The Palmer publication is available on line but is so large it is difficult to manipulate.

I hope this helps.

Jim

Lisa, Jim has helped me many times with ID's of Whiskey Bridge shells. I would definitely go with his ID's.

I appreciate it Jim! :) I looked up bonellitia parilis in a more detailed PDF Don sent me today and it looks to be a perfect match! I am just really enjoying this material. Thank you very much for you're help and time. :)
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Hey Lissa, looks like you are having some fun with gastropods! I'm going to a site tomorrow as part of my job and will probably snag a few more of the dang things from the parking lot which is made up literally of all fossil shells. I cant tell you how many strange looks that I've gotten recently from other folks wondering what I was doing while wandering around with my head staring down looking for them.. :)

Hope you find some more! Regards, Chris

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Hey Lissa, looks like you are having some fun with gastropods! I'm going to a site tomorrow as part of my job and will probably snag a few more of the dang things from the parking lot which is made up literally of all fossil shells. I cant tell you how many strange looks that I've gotten recently from other folks wondering what I was doing while wandering around with my head staring down looking for them.. :)

Hope you find some more! Regards, Chris

I am having gastropod fun Chris and thanks! :) There are more shells along with some other things I am not familiar with... I know exactly what you mean about the strange looks. lol My mom moved a little while ago into a condo and each of the units have their own garden that is full of rocks. The first time I went to visit after she moved in a stigmaria fossil caught my eye. Since then I've found a few calamites, pieces full of crinoid segments and brachiopods. I'm fairly certain her neighbors think I'm crazy. I am always flipping rocks over in her garden with my feet... haha ;)
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Nice photos lissa. I'm a new fan of the ole Whiskey Bridge myself

Who could believe there is such diversity in these little gastropods.

Thanks for the clarification Jim.

It's hard to remember why you drained the swamp when your surrounded by alligators.

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Lissa,

Your ID's for No.s 1,2,and 5 are,I believe, spot on. Your ID on the Distorsio septemdentata should be in my opinion, Bonellitia parilis Palmer, 1937. The D. septemdentata has seven teeth on the inside of the outer lip. Also, the B. parilis will show two folds on the columella.

On No. 4, you are correct on the ID of the genus and specie but it is not the subspecie carinata. It is simply Pseudoliva vetusta. The Pseudoliva vetusta carinata displays an umbilicus (a central cavity of a shellformed by the walls on the inner sides of the whorls). Pseudoliva can be a confusing genus.

For my ID's I am using John and Barbara Emerson's Publication "Middle Eocene Claiborne Invertebrate Fossils from the Stone City Bluff" dated 2001 and published by the Houston Gem and Mineral Society and Bulletins ofAmerican Paleontology, Vol. 7, "Claibornian Scaphopoda,Gastropoda, and Dibranchiate Cephalopoda of the Southern United States", by K.V.w. Palmer. The Palmer publication is available on line but is so large it is difficult to manipulate.

I hope this helps.

Jim

Nice photos lissa. I'm a new fan of the ole Whiskey Bridge myself

Who could believe there is such diversity in these little gastropods.

Thanks for the clarification Jim.

Thanks squali! There sure is a lot of diversity! I am having a difficult time differentiating between some of the cone shaped ones right now to be honest... I'm hoping to get my hands on some more of this material one of these days! :)

Jim, thanks again and I edited my incorrect ID's to yours in case any members looked at this post for identification help. I looked up that book on amazon and it comes up unavailable. I shall be keeping my eyes open for it! :)

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I am having gastropod fun Chris and thanks! :) There are more shells along with some other things I am not familiar with... I know exactly what you mean about the strange looks. lol My mom moved a little while ago into a condo and each of the units have their own garden that is full of rocks. The first time I went to visit after she moved in a stigmaria fossil caught my eye. Since then I've found a few calamites, pieces full of crinoid segments and brachiopods. I'm fairly certain her neighbors think I'm crazy. I am always flipping rocks over in her garden with my feet... haha ;)

Hi Lissa, yep I've torn up a few folks yards looking for stuff! :) Oh well, today a guy stopped me and asked what I was doing. I was actually looking for sharkteeth at the time and told him I wasnt finding much but I did come away with more dang Tamiami formation gastropods and another pile of stuff..too much fun! Here's 2 of them--how about a coral ...I think its Septastrea marylandica encrusting an unidentified gastropod and a strange colonial tube type called Vermicularia recta--looks like a bunch of worm casings but I guess its really a bunch of filter feeding gastropods.

post-1240-0-31223800-1396316586_thumb.jpgpost-1240-0-48270300-1396316580_thumb.jpg

Continued fun with all the other stuff. Wish we had some stinking Calamites down here! You guys are so lucky with all those Carboniferous plants!

Regards, Chris

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Hi Lissa, yep I've torn up a few folks yards looking for stuff! :) Oh well, today a guy stopped me and asked what I was doing. I was actually looking for sharkteeth at the time and told him I wasnt finding much but I did come away with more dang Tamiami formation gastropods and another pile of stuff..too much fun! Here's 2 of them--how about a coral ...I think its Septastrea marylandica encrusting an unidentified gastropod and a strange colonial tube type called Vermicularia recta--looks like a bunch of worm casings but I guess its really a bunch of filter feeding gastropods.

attachicon.gifSeptastrea marylandica encrusted gastropod.jpgattachicon.gifVermicularia recta 2.jpg

Continued fun with all the other stuff. Wish we had some stinking Calamites down here! You guys are so lucky with all those Carboniferous plants!

Regards, Chris

Nice Chris!!! :D Thanks for sharing! I love the gastropod with the coral. I have found coral in Florida in many colors but not that pretty of a color!!! I mistook those gastropods for tube worms for a long time. That's a pretty nice size chunk of them you got there! Thanks for sharing them. :) We sure do have our fair share of carboniferous plants up here! The majority of my finds have been calamites and haven't found any 3D ones yet. Did just start hunting here last summer though so fingers crossed! Annularia and my clam shrimp were very exciting for me. ;) Happy hunting too you!!!
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nice fossils ive only got like two snail shells in my collection and they are tinyyyyyy but those make my mouth water.....................not in a hungry for food way mind you :P

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