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One More I.d.


Drizzt0000

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Yes, it's an oyster. (No brachiopods in the Niobrara) They are very, very common in some areas.

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Yes, it's an oyster. (No brachiopods in the Niobrara) They are very, very common in some areas.

I had assumed it was from the same locale he got the fenestella bryo and derbia brachiopod (neither of which can be found in the Cretaceous)

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Ahhh.....I see where you were coming from Jim. I've seen literally thousands of those in W. Kansas so I knew immediately what they were. Totally see where you would think that. :-)

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Once again, it would help if people would include some hints as to age, locality, and rock formation when asking for an ID. If I could read minds, I'd either be rich or insane, probably both.

Don

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Exogyra bottom shell

"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes

"can't we all just get along?" Jack Nicholson from Mars Attacks

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To clarify....this is 100% Psuedoperna congesta. It's a small bivalve that commonly encrusts larger Inoceramus clams. It's a common bivalve of the Niobrara Chalk fm. of Kansas.

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