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Centipede Head In Copal?


NZ_Fossil_Collecta

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i just bought some more copal from the shops, it is either columbian or madgascan copal, in appearance it is like madagascar copal but its hardness is like columbian copal, also there is confusion surrounding columbian copal in terms of age so it is likely it is that because the shop is mistakenly selling it as amber alongside some low-grade pieces of REAL amber. anyways, enough gabbling from me, i spotted this in the copal. my guess is the front part of a centipede. there is also a pic of the piece as well.

thanks for the help.

post-13660-0-67988300-1397371824_thumb.jpg<inclusion

post-13660-0-97361200-1397371841_thumb.jpg<piece

I'm CRAZY about amber fossils and just as CRAZY in general.

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here are some more photos, these are of centipedes in baltic and dominican amber, respectively. they show very similar features to the one in the copal.

post-13660-0-07447200-1397373366_thumb.jpg<centipede in baltic amber

post-13660-0-71898100-1397373386_thumb.jpg<centipede in dominican amber

I'm CRAZY about amber fossils and just as CRAZY in general.

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I don't see a centipede. The legs all seem to originate in the same segment and the jaws don't seem heavy enough. On a centipede it is one pair of legs per segment these are bunched up together as if they were all attached to the thorax of an insect.

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I have some inclusions that I call 'ghost' or trace pieces. Faint in appearance, mostly just the print. This one really looks like a termite from Columbian copal. Man, I really enjoy working on copal and amber during the winter months. I can stay inside where it's warm with a cup of mud and keep warm 'n dry. Hey, careful with the copal, it will fracture rapidly in direct sunlight or heat.

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.
-Albert Einstein

crabes-07.gif

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Amber-winter-cup o' Joe-warm & dry......couldn't have said it any better myself CH4ShotCaller!

--- Joshua

tennesseespride@gmail.com

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i just bought some more copal from the shops, it is either columbian or madgascan copal, in appearance it is like madagascar copal but its hardness is like columbian copal, also there is confusion surrounding columbian copal in terms of age so it is likely it is that because the shop is mistakenly selling it as amber alongside some low-grade pieces of REAL amber. anyways, enough gabbling from me, i spotted this in the copal. my guess is the front part of a centipede. there is also a pic of the piece as well.

thanks for the help.

attachicon.gifphoto 2 (6).JPG<inclusion

attachicon.gifphoto 3 (1).JPG<piece

Sir, that gives me the impression it is perhaps some species of termite. You have some very beautiful Amber & Copal by the way.

--- Joshua

tennesseespride@gmail.com

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thanks guys, termite it is then, i guess. now to put it in my black-lined amber storage drawer.

I'm CRAZY about amber fossils and just as CRAZY in general.

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Amber-winter-cup o' Joe-warm & dry......couldn't have said it any better myself CH4ShotCaller!

I'll second that! Nothing like opening a time capsule while Mother Nature is chucking a tantrum outside. (Heavy rain, thunderstorm etc)

I'm CRAZY about amber fossils and just as CRAZY in general.

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looks like a termite to me also very nice, also nice centipede in the Baltic piece

"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes

"can't we all just get along?" Jack Nicholson from Mars Attacks

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As I recall, termites would not typically be in a tree wound, as very few actually feed on live wood, those that do are known as the dampwood termites, which live in the tree they are feeding on and are a tropical group, and, also as I recall, trees that produce pitch are mostly conifers, not common in the tropics, at least in modern forests.

Of course, this is an awful lot of recalling.

fkaa

ashcraft, brent allen

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As I recall, termites would not typically be in a tree wound, as very few actually feed on live wood, those that do are known as the dampwood termites, which live in the tree they are feeding on and are a tropical group, and, also as I recall, trees that produce pitch are mostly conifers, not common in the tropics, at least in modern forests.

Of course, this is an awful lot of recalling.

fkaa

I read an article (not in the following sentences) that some of the trees in one particular locale that still produced that resin was still thriving until the demand for incense caused that stretch of land be cleared to get at the copal buried under those trees. Various tropical trees, such as Hymenaea courbaril or Hymenae protea, produce Colombian and Brazilian copal. Major deposits of copal are produced from tropical legume and araucarian trees (conifers indigenous today to South America and Australia) and are found in tropical or wet temperate regions where these resin producing trees still exist (Grimaldi, 1996, p. 16).

Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new.
-Albert Einstein

crabes-07.gif

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Six legs, segmented antennae, no wings, pointy bit out the back end. The last feature leads me to identify it as a springtail.

Here is link to more Collembola in amber for comparison.

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I would agree with Tethys. A closer look at the head would help, but it seems rather small in proportion to the thorax and abdomen for a termite. And of course there's this furcula-like appendage (if it is not a non-related inclusion) not present in termites.

Nevertheless it is a very interesting specimen.

Jean

Edited by JeanB

JeanB

Montreal, QC, Canada

Ordovician, Trenton group

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here are some more photos, these are of centipedes in baltic and dominican amber, respectively. they show very similar features to the one in the copal.

attachicon.gifbaltic amber centipede.jpg<centipede in baltic amber

attachicon.gifdominican amber centipede.JPG<centipede in dominican amber

these are off the internet BTW

I'm CRAZY about amber fossils and just as CRAZY in general.

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Six legs, segmented antennae, no wings, pointy bit out the back end. The last feature leads me to identify it as a springtail.

Here is link to more Collembola in amber for comparison.

very interesting.... this is getting very interesting

I'm CRAZY about amber fossils and just as CRAZY in general.

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I read an article (not in the following sentences) that some of the trees in one particular locale that still produced that resin was still thriving until the demand for incense caused that stretch of land be cleared to get at the copal buried under those trees. Various tropical trees, such as Hymenaea courbaril or Hymenae protea, produce [/size]Colombian[/size] and Brazilian [/size]copal. [/size]Major deposits of copal are produced from tropical legume and araucarian trees (conifers indigenous today to South America and Australia) and are found in tropical or wet temperate regions where these resin producing trees still exist (Grimaldi, 1996, p. 16).

Very interesting. It would also be interesting to know if the dampwoods regularly feed on these species. The production of so much resin would seem to indicate otherwise, but nature will find a way.

I hadn't considered (and like) springtails. I was thinking more along the lines of a roach nymph, but doesn't look quite right.

fkaa

ashcraft, brent allen

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Six legs, segmented antennae, no wings, pointy bit out the back end. The last feature leads me to identify it as a springtail.

Here is link to more Collembola in amber for comparison.

I thought of that also but I remembered them having longer "springs" Nice ID.

"Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence"_ Carl Sagen

No trees were killed in this posting......however, many innocent electrons were diverted from where they originally intended to go.

" I think, therefore I collect fossils." _ Me

"When you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth."__S. Holmes

"can't we all just get along?" Jack Nicholson from Mars Attacks

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nature will find a way.

dr. Ian malcolm said something along those lines warning dr. hammond about his dinosaur park.

I'm CRAZY about amber fossils and just as CRAZY in general.

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