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Just Some Of Our Mammoth (Mostly Southern Mammoth) Finds.


mammothhunter

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These are just some of our mammoth molar (+1 half jaw segment).

Mostly Southern Mammoth but also perhaps a few Forest Elephant (I was told this was a possibility) and some Wooly Mammoth as well.

Ice Age Hungary.

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Wow! Very nice!

"In Africa, one can't help becoming caught up in the spine-chilling excitement of the hunt. Perhaps, it has something to do with a memory of a time gone by, when we were the prey, and our nights were filled with darkness..."

-Eternal Enemies: Lions And Hyenas

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impressive collection

Grüße,

Daniel A. Wöhr aus Südtexas

"To the motivated go the spoils."

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Thanks for sharing! Definitely a collection anyone would be proud to have, especially if there are stories behind each!

~Charlie~

"There are those that look at things the way they are, and ask why.....i dream of things that never were, and ask why not?" ~RFK
->Get your Mosasaur print
->How to spot a fake Trilobite
->How to identify a CONCRETION from a DINOSAUR EGG

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Thanks all.

I wish I could say that there are interesting stories attached, but we mostly get these from the source here for our part-time business :)

A few have stuck around the house tho, due to some interesting characteristic like shape or colour, etc.

Here are some juvenile molars and a matched Wooly pair :)

We mostly concentrate on mammoth fossils, but I will try to expand a bit in the future.

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Edited by mammothhunter
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So am i to assume that you have an extensive knowledge in Mammoth teeth? Because a few of us were wondering about Mammoth milk teeth and the minimum size that could ultimately be found. See here http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/26207-minimum-mammoth-tooth-size/?hl=%2Bmammoth+%2Bmilk+%2Bteeth#entry287195

Also knowing that Mammoths and Mastodons only have so many teeth to go through in a lifetime, have you ever come across teeth worn down to the root?

~Charlie~

"There are those that look at things the way they are, and ask why.....i dream of things that never were, and ask why not?" ~RFK
->Get your Mosasaur print
->How to spot a fake Trilobite
->How to identify a CONCRETION from a DINOSAUR EGG

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Well, I wouldn't say extensive, but I've seen a few hundred so far :)

The smallest milk tooth I've run across is about the width of a US quarter and it was from the North Sea, Netherlands.The tooth was whole and oval-shaped. The supplier told me that in all likelihood, it was a still birth, so quite rare to get it off the ocean floor.

I've seen very very worn down teeth. So much so that there was a relatively thin section of molar with long roots (Compared to the plate size).

Here is the weirdest thing I've ever seen. It's a tusk that has had some deformation during forming, so that it looks almost like two tusk fused into one (It's indeed a mammoth tusk of some kind, as one can see Schreger lines) :

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Ouch!! That pathological tusk must have been a world-class tooth ache. Probably made him grumpy! :o

  • I found this Informative 1

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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Very nice! Do you have a method for locating these? I believe I have identified a migration route for these animals in my area and would really like to make a more educated attempt at locating them.

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Hey Trilobite Nut :)

Well, these are concentrated in the various mines here.

For the most part, we avoid the fossils that are found in the soil areas, because of quite restrictive laws about that kind of material here. I believe it's something along the lines that any material found in-situ on land should be passed along to the government / universities for excavation / study.

So we mostly concentrate on out of context materials. Washed down during the ages into concentrations :)

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Beautiful finds you have there, thanks so much for sharing! :)

Every once in a great while it's not just a big rock down there!

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Great work, they are some very interesting pieces!

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