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Finding Terrestrial Devonian Plants In A Marine Deposit


Jeffrey P

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post-13044-0-07035300-1399601966_thumb.jpgLast summer I posted a description of an excellent, but hot day collecting from the Dave Elliot Bed, at a Middle Devonian site just outside Kingston, NY. The site, as I described, is a thin layer only inches thick, rich in tiny bivalves and cephalopods (straight-shelled nautiloids and the goniatite, Tornoceras). Eumetabolotoechia brachiopods and fossils of terrestrial plants are also present as are occasional rare fossils like conularids. It is a deepwater site and the limited fauna are specially adapted to those conditions. The plants probably originated from forests that lined a river delta somewhere to the east, remains of which have long ago disappeared after millions of years of erosion. The plants which include branches of Psilophyton and Lycopod bark with leaf scars are what remains of this very ancient vanished forest.

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Edited by Jeffrey P
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Jeff,

Sorry I missed this!

Very cool any time you can find devonian plants!

Congratulations on some interesting plant finds.

Regards,

    Tim    -  VETERAN SHALE SPLITTER

   VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png    VFOTM  --- APRIL - 2015       MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png      PaleoPartner.png.30c01982e09b0cc0b7d9d6a7a21f56c6.png.a600039856933851eeea617ca3f2d15f.png     Postmaster1.jpg.900efa599049929531fa81981f028e24.jpg        IPFOTM -- MAY - 2024   IPFOTM5.png.fb4f2a268e315c58c5980ed865b39e1f.png

_________________________________________________________________________________
"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks."

John Muir ~ ~ ~ ~   ><))))( *>  About Me      

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William Stein, paleobotanist at SUNY Binghamton, described the fossils as 1.) a fragment of a lycopsid, 2 and 4 perhaps belonging to Aneurophytales though uncertain, and 3.) also perhaps a aneurophytalean rhizome although this remains highly speculative. I should also credit Alex Batholomew, paleontology professor at SUNY New Paltz for the photographs.

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Thanks for the update, Jeff.

Very cool that you have those contacts.

Now to go look up "Aneurophytales ". :blush:

Regards,

    Tim    -  VETERAN SHALE SPLITTER

   VFOTM.png.f1b09c78bf88298b009b0da14ef44cf0.png    VFOTM  --- APRIL - 2015       MOTM.png.61350469b02f439fd4d5d77c2c69da85.png      PaleoPartner.png.30c01982e09b0cc0b7d9d6a7a21f56c6.png.a600039856933851eeea617ca3f2d15f.png     Postmaster1.jpg.900efa599049929531fa81981f028e24.jpg        IPFOTM -- MAY - 2024   IPFOTM5.png.fb4f2a268e315c58c5980ed865b39e1f.png

_________________________________________________________________________________
"In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks."

John Muir ~ ~ ~ ~   ><))))( *>  About Me      

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