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Anomalocaris Ate Worms!


piranha

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A couple months ago I posted a 2014 GSA conference abstract on this topic, here is the resulting honors thesis.

 

Enjoy!

 

 

Oxman, K. (2014)

Comparative analysis of a unique specimen of a new species of Anomalocaris from the Kinzers Formation of Lancaster County yields a reassessment of the feeding habits of the genus.

Franklin and Marshall College Archives, Undergraduate Honors Thesis, 58 pp.

 

PDF OPEN ACCESS

 

 

 

image.png.a84de26dad44fb03836a743755df237c.png

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Is that because nobody liked him?

Interesting project for an honor's thesis.

Don

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Thanks for the link, Scott.

Very interesting.

Regards,

    Tim    -  VETERAN SHALE SPLITTER

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In August 2013 I went on a guided tour to the Walcott Quarry to see the Burgess Shale world heritage site in Yoho National Park, British Columbia:http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/bc/yoho/natcul/burgess/visit/randonnees-hikes.aspx It was thrilling.

While at the site my wife found the fossil pictured below amid the shale (photo only, you are not permitted to collect). Our Parks Canada guide took a look at it and said it was likely the circular mouth structure of an Anomalocaris. Note: The lens depicted in the photo is ~ 1 inch in diameter.

post-13457-0-70831100-1401208931_thumb.jpg

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In August 2013 I went on a guided tour to the Walcott Quarry to see the Burgess Shale world heritage site in Yoho National Park, British Columbia:http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/bc/yoho/natcul/burgess/visit/randonnees-hikes.aspx It was thrilling.

While at the site my wife found the fossil pictured below amid the shale (photo only, you are not permitted to collect). Our Parks Canada guide took a look at it and said it was likely the circular mouth structure of an Anomalocaris. Note: The lens depicted in the photo is ~ 1 inch in diameter.

Thanks for posting this, and welcome to the Forum, neighbor!

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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I can't imagine where he found some exposed Kinzers formation in Lancaster. That area is all built up! Wonder if it's publicly accessible? :zzzzscratchchin::drool:

-Dave

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Geologists on the whole are inconsistent drivers. When a roadcut presents itself, they tend to lurch and weave. To them, the roadcut is a portal, a fragment of a regional story, a proscenium arch that leads their imaginations into the earth and through the surrounding terrain. - John McPhee

If I'm going to drive safely, I can't do geology. - John McPhee

Check out my Blog for more fossils I've found: http://viewsofthemahantango.blogspot.com/

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