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A Couple Of More From The Cretaceous Period At Austin Chalk - Eagle Ford Shale Contact


gturner333

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I recently posted some pictures of teeth from the Ashgrove Quarry in TX, which is Cretaceous Period at Austin Chalk - Eagle Ford Shale Contact. Some of you ID'd them as drum fish teeth (or possibly Paralbula casei). I later added what I thought might be some teeth plates for ID.

Since then, I have gone through some of my bulk matrix from the TXI quarry near Ashgrove. It too is the same formation. I found more of the drum teeth and what looks to me to be a tooth plate. Please confirm or shoot down this ID. I also found a 2nd item that needs ID'ing. I would really appreciate your help on these. And, if anyone wants to check out the other posting under "Tiny Teeth From Ashgrove Quarry - Austin Chalk-Eagleford Shale" and tell me if those are also tooth plates, that would be great.

post-11358-0-33167400-1401670940_thumb.jpg

post-11358-0-39612900-1401670942_thumb.jpg

post-11358-0-08366800-1401670944_thumb.jpg

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I think the 'tractor track' is a denture clam; Rastellum sp.

"There has been an alarming increase in the number of things I know nothing about." - Ashleigh Ellwood Brilliant

“Try to learn something about everything and everything about something.” - Thomas Henry Huxley

>Paleontology is an evolving science.

>May your wonders never cease!

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The first two pics are a section of Ammonite, and the last looks like a fishtooth plate.

This guy is right.

Bone2stone

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Agreed, the first two photos are of an ammonite fragment. I'm not necessarily convinced the third photo is a tooth plate. It may just be an interesting pattern on one of the common phosphate nodules in that quarry. Extra cleaning might offer more clues or confirmation of an ID.

The human mind has the ability to believe anything is true.  -  JJ

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Your third specimen looks like Pleurodictyum, sponge coral. I call it Honeycomb coral.

I agree with Ammonite with the first two.

~Charlie~

"There are those that look at things the way they are, and ask why.....i dream of things that never were, and ask why not?" ~RFK
->Get your Mosasaur print
->How to spot a fake Trilobite
->How to identify a CONCRETION from a DINOSAUR EGG

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Your third specimen looks like Pleurodictyum, sponge coral. I call it Honeycomb coral.

I agree with Ammonite with the first two.

Are you aware of Pleurodictyum species in the Upper Cretaceous that look like this?

The human mind has the ability to believe anything is true.  -  JJ

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No, it's Devonian. But im just going off of the structure and shape. Judging from the weathered edges it could have been bouncing around for a bit and redeposited. It was just an idea.

~Charlie~

"There are those that look at things the way they are, and ask why.....i dream of things that never were, and ask why not?" ~RFK
->Get your Mosasaur print
->How to spot a fake Trilobite
->How to identify a CONCRETION from a DINOSAUR EGG

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If you would, please look at the other posting i referenced above. There are a couple of other plates/corals that may shed some light.

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I looked closely to your photo of your "plate" and it does look like a mouth plate. On the bottom left there is still a trace of what looks to be enamel and the round shape of a tooth. So it would be safe to say that it's a mouth plate from a fish of some sort.

Edited by fossilized6s

~Charlie~

"There are those that look at things the way they are, and ask why.....i dream of things that never were, and ask why not?" ~RFK
->Get your Mosasaur print
->How to spot a fake Trilobite
->How to identify a CONCRETION from a DINOSAUR EGG

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I doubt that last one is a tooth plate. It looks exactly like chondrichthyan cartilage we get in the Cretaceous of NJ.

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  • 2 weeks later...

this is a belated thank you for all who helped. I was still going through some of that material when I ran across a better section of the ammonite. Your ID was spot-on. I also cleaned up what I thought might be a fish plate and it really does look more like coral. The bumps are not round like other plates I have found.post-11358-0-01858200-1402660363_thumb.jpg

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I doubt that last one is a tooth plate. It looks exactly like chondrichthyan cartilage we get in the Cretaceous of NJ.

I agree with Carl on this one. The little connecting lines very much suggest cartilage.

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after searching for "fossilized shark cartilage", that does seem like a better match.

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