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Astoundingly Huge Dino Found


JimB88

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if anyone wants the actual paper describing the find, message me and I can send it. Copyright laws don't allow public sharing, but I downloaded it at my institute and can share it

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if anyone wants the actual paper describing the find, message me and I can send it. Copyright laws don't allow public sharing, but I downloaded it at my institute and can share it

Actually, the paper is open access (I double checked), so anyone can view it now that the embargo was lifted this morning. The main paper is here, and there's a link for supplementary information there as well.

The specimens are really quite amazing, given how complete they are compared with related species. Dreadnoughtus is also one of the coolest names for an extinct species ever - although I have to admit a bias of interest seeing that I've been visiting the bones themselves at the prep lab at the Academy of Natural Sciences since 2009.

Also of interest are 3D scans of individual bones and the entire skeleton, which are freely available online here.

What a wonderful menagerie! Who would believe that such as register lay buried in the strata? To open the leaves, to unroll the papyrus, has been an intensely interesting though difficult work, having all the excitement and marvelous development of a romance. And yet the volume is only partly read. Many a new page I fancy will yet be opened. -- Edward Hitchcock, 1858

Formerly known on the forum as Crimsonraptor

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Actually, the paper is open access (I double checked), so anyone can view it now that the embargo was lifted this morning. The main paper is here, and there's a link for supplementary information there as well.

The specimens are really quite amazing, given how complete they are compared with related species. Dreadnoughtus is also one of the coolest names for an extinct species ever - although I have to admit a bias of interest seeing that I've been visiting the bones themselves at the prep lab at the Academy of Natural Sciences since 2009.

Also of interest are 3D scans of individual bones and the entire skeleton, which are freely available online here.

ah ok, my bad. Thanks for clarifying. I'm so used to journal articles being behind a paywall which my institution pays, so i figured i'd offer.

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There were several species of 80+ foot sauropods. Cool fossils, cool name, but nothing record breaking in terms of size.

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Some more details can be found at:

Drexel Team Unveils Dreadnoughtus: a Gigantic,

Execeptionally Complete Sauropod Dinosaur by

Rachel Ewing, Drexel News Blog, September 4, 2014

http://drexel.edu/now/archive/2014/September/Dreadnoughtus-Dinosaur/

and http://newsblog.drexel.edu/dinosaur/

Dreadnoughtus schrani: Frequently Asked

Questions on the Super-Massive Dinosaur

Drexel News Blog, September 4, 2014

http://newsblog.drexel.edu/2014/09/04/dreadnoughtus-schrani-frequently-asked-questions-on-the-super-massive-dinosaur/

Digging Deeper into Dreadnoughtus: Dinosaur

Interview with Ken Lacovara, Drexel News Blog,

September 4, 2014

http://newsblog.drexel.edu/2014/09/04/digging-deeper-into-dreadnoughtus-dinosaur-interview-with-ken-lacovara/

Yours,

Paul H.

Edited by Oxytropidoceras
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Argentina strikes again!

Everything big seems to come from there... largest sauropods (Argentinosaurus and now this, if we discount Amphicoelias), two of the largest theropods (Giganotosaurus and Mapusaurus), largest flying bird (Argentavis), largest cat (Smilodon populator) and perhaps the biggest ground dwelling bird too (Kelenken). And that's just off the top of my head, there is probably others.

"In Africa, one can't help becoming caught up in the spine-chilling excitement of the hunt. Perhaps, it has something to do with a memory of a time gone by, when we were the prey, and our nights were filled with darkness..."

-Eternal Enemies: Lions And Hyenas

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This Dreadnoughtus was on national news last night, and the new caster was holding up a toe bone.

Yep, pretty big.

And its a shame that a lot of papers end up behind pay walls. A lot of that research is publicly funded, and then it ends up being locked away from the people who paid for it.

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