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1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Vegitation

1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Vegitation
Rcotton1
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Documenting the 1925 Hagemeyer Body and Trace Fossil Collection. This collection has been sealed until late August 2019 and never reviewed by the public.

The collection consists of Vegetation Fossils, Trace Fossils, Body Fossils as well as Minerals of all kinds, 400+. The specimens came from a 1924-25 Expedition to Argentina. A more informative account is written in the "Ocean" Album barring the same name.

 

What has been remarkable to study about these berry specimens are that they still bare the fruit and in most cases the skin still intact. a few have been split open and you can see the shape of the fruit inside. A few specimens have the seed, fruit, skin or shell open to view. The ground cherries, which are the majority of the berries portion have a orange color to the fossil, while having a darker ring on the inside and finally the heart of the berry being a redder brown. Below are what the ground cherries would have looked like 52 Ma ago to the present. A few of the berries have a build up of minerals that would have been the attached paper thin husks.

 

A walnut half shell with husk and meat still inside, and a few berries with larger seeds visible. As well as what looks to be a Fossilized Pteridosperm seed known as Trigonocarpus.

 

The Tree/Wood Fossil portion has larger specimens that have turned to amber while the smaller specimens are stone

5 Comments

I have been asked to reevaluate my "berries" pics and take out any that could be concretions. These were labeled by 1925 meteorite specialists that must have known a little what they were doing, it was one of the largest expeditions to date in Argentina and had some of the top specialist around the world. I will reshoot the berries and concretions (I shouldn't have bunched them up, just trying to save time). It looks as if my phone takes better pictures than my fancy digital camera :/ I will also be re taking the pics for trees 1 and 2, the grain in the pics looks more like rock then fossilized wood. Thank you for those looking out for the newbies

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I was so excited to add my fossils that I didn’t feel the need to also add all of my research, silly me, I do have a background in history, although it’s been many years that I had to study, I did do my homework before adding anything, My first and present goal has been to find out who this person was?  For the past 4 years I have been hunting down leads and finding out horror stories of what this man did in his positions of authority. So I was very speculative when it came to anything he was a part of. There have been so far as I can track 6 murders before this collection even came to rest where it did for 75 years.

When getting to the berries portion of the collection, I was under the impression that the fleshy parts of a berry could not have been able to fossilize, however this believe, is only hung on by those that do not believe in tiny chances and walla, once you believe you can’t go back. These fossils are not to antagonize, but to inspire that miracles happen every day, even in science.

While I regather that information and create diagrams of why and how I came to the same conclusion they did in 1925. While I am preparing this info, I would ask the reader to take a close look at each of the specimens. “Everyone” is an expert on concretions, I have found that when someone doesn’t know what they are looking at they shout out, “Concretions!”. Well, we first need to look at what the “Matrix” is made up of, look close to all 49. Next we need to look at the outer layers of each specimen. (There are a few in these pics that will be removed because they land in a nut/seed portion pic3, pic 4, pic 5. My apologies for my sloppiness.) All specimens with a break in the top layer have the same thickness called an Exocarp, the minerals that filled this area are also a shade different in color as well as fossilizing to the texture of the “skin”. Next thing to look at on the opened specimens, do they have the signs of the Pericarp as well as a seed(s) large or tiny. All of these specimens that I added fit the criteria of living tissue as well as the minerals that took their place. These specimens do not fit the criteria of a concretion other than being round, oh, and they break open.

 

“An astronomer, a physicist and a mathematician are on a train in Scotland. They look out the window and see a lone black sheep in a field. "Amazing", says the astronomer, "all sheep in Scotland are black!" The physicist rolls his eyes and says "you astronomers, always jumping to conclusions without sufficient data. There exists a field in Scotland which contains a black sheep." The mathematician looks at his colleagues and says "allow me to add some true rigor: there exists in Scotland a field which contains a sheep which is black on one side!"”

 

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Harry Pristis

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I am skeptical about the "berries."  Considering that bamboo is a thin-walled, hollow grass, what is the perspective of the images vis a vis the bamboo stem?

 

 

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Thank you for the kind way of asking, the experts that have seen the specimens have not all agreed with what was labeled in the collection, but the one thing that everyone did was 1st pick up the ammonites and say, "this is an ammonite segment, and this here is a bamboo piece". It really was the only two items that all agreed on, so I took their word as being more knowledgeable then myself. I actually thought it was bone :/ I will relabel to tree

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Harry Pristis

Posted

 

I think there has been a fundamental error in identifying the "bamboo."  The pieces you illustrate cannot be bamboo because the pattern and bulk matches no part of what we think of as bamboo.  The pattern alone precludes a burl.

 

The two specimens you show are much more likely to be palmoxylon - petrified palm wood.  Here are some examples from Etsy.

 

palm_beads.thumb.jpg.4ea3cd6cd9b5a431102cdec014f39178.jpg

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