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Found 300 results

  1. From Badlands National Park

    Any idea what this might be? Or even what body part (skull?) We found this hiking in Badlands National Park in western South Dakota. We were hiking through bluffs made of Oligocene sediments that were rich in mammal fossils. Unfortunately no scale in the photo, but it was about 12 cm long and 10 cm wide.
  2. Fossil I.D

    Hello fellow TFF Members Does anyone have any idea what this might be? Found it, and another one very similar, in the Creede Formation of Creede, Colorado. Sorry that I did not put in a scale; it is approx. 3" in diameter. The center circle has radiating lines. From that circle there are several concentric rings. From what I have read, the site was a salty lake formed in the Creede Caldera. Most of the fossils are plants and the sediment is fine grained volcanic ash. Almost looks like a jellyfish to me. Any I.D. will be much appreciated. I am stumped. Thanks, ODK
  3. Oligocene

    Due to the smaller cusp, these would be Carcharocles Angustidens??
  4. Carcharocles

    This group of teeth should be from the Eocene period? Carcharocles Auriculatus I am guessing due to the size of the cusp?? Teeth are 1.4" and found in the Chandler bridge formation.
  5. Dermal denticles

    Originally from the Midwest, I've been hunting for fossils for about 50 years and found about two "fossilized sea shells". And this was not from a lack of trying! I moved to Summerville, SC about three years ago for a job that included lots of travel. Now that travel is finished and meeting new friends in the area, I have connected with some kids that stumbled onto something that I think is big! Had I grown up in Summerville, I probably would have change my career to paleontology instead of Electrical Engineering. I am amazed at the finds here in my home town. I have taken my wife and kids including their friends to a spot that allows them to find Shark teeth (at a minimum) within 2 minutes of arriving to an area. My dilemma, I would like to know what these type of "dermal denticles" are. For every 20 shark teeth I find, I find one of these. Please refer to the attached pics. Thanks Matt
  6. M&M Ranch in Nebraska

    My younger son Mel just led his first fossil trip of the year on our Oligocene M&M Ranch in Nebraska last week. My sons, Mel and Marco Jr., are starting to get back from their prepper some of the fossils that they found on our ranch in 2018. Not all fossils go to the prepper. Mel preps some of the specimens himself. Below is a picture of the specimens Mel found in 2018 that he will prep. Here are a few pictures of 2018 specimens just back from the prepper. Mel found another saber cat in 2018 that is in prep. Below are a saber cat skull found by Mel and saber cat skeleton found by Marco Jr. (the skeleton was still in prep in this picture and I can't find the finished picture right now) in previous years on the ranch. They have found seven or eight so far on the ranch. I'll probably be going out to the ranch a couple of times this year. However, I spend most of my time at the ranch taking matrix that contains micro squamate, bird, amphibian, and mammal specimens. I'm currently working with seven researchers on this micro material. Marco Sr.
  7. My Giant Alopiid Collection

    Hello Everyone, I’m rather fond of Giant Alopiids, and I have taken to collecting them. I find it strange that such a wonderful, yet mysterious creature remains relatively unknown and scantly studied. I may have space in my high school schedule for an independent study senior year, and I’ve considered using it to make a poster or paper on their morphology, taxonomy, phylogeny and such for The Rostrum or something. However, I’ve heard tell that there is already a comprehensive paper on giant alopiids in the works. We’ll see if there will be anything left for me to discuss. Anyway, collecting them is a slow process as they are quite rare and I am quite cheap (I have yet to find one myself). I thought I’d make a thread to show off what I have thus far and to keep them cataloged for myself. Hopefully this page will grow as time goes on Dashes are around 1 inch apart. South Carolina Alopias grandis
  8. Bone ID request

    Good afternoon, I have now found a total of four bones with this same shape. Found in Jacksonville, NC at Onslow Beach. I posted one over a year ago that was too worn to identify. Since then I have found these three with two in much better shape. Any idea what this bone has come from in relation to location on body and hopefully what animal? Thank you
  9. Oreodont in situ - Nebraska Oligocene

  10. Are there any Seattle-area folks on here who have tried hunting for beach fossils around Alki Point? You can see the outcrop pretty well on satellite images and it's on the geological maps. This Blakeley formation is pretty crumbly, though, so I'm not sure whether any meaningful fossils would survive being washed out in the surf. Guess there's only one way to find out! Since we're coming up on the new moon, the low tides are nicely timed for a long lunch break, so I'll plan to check this out some time in the next few days and report back.
  11. Document Requests : Ediscetus

    Hi, I forgot to mention anyone has a copy of the following paper: Albright, L. B., III, A. E. Sanders, and J. H. Geisler. 2018. An unexpectedly derived odontocete from the Ashley Formation (upper Rupelian) of South Carolina, U.S.A. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology. DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2018.1482555. Also, I wanted to see if anyone has scanned a copy of " Neogene Cetacea of the Lee Creek Phosphate Mine, North Carolina", because the publication in which this section is included carries a hefty price tag.
  12. Possible tooth-unknown species

    Good afternoon, on a recent trip to Onslow Beach located in Jacksonville, NC I found several interesting items. I will list each separately. I have researched each item and will provide my thoughts on identification. Please feel free to correct me and or provide greater guidance as I am a true beginner. My third item- I believe this item is a small tooth. The shape appears correct however, I have not seen one that looks like this specimen coming from this location. The specimen is very shiny- even when dry as seen in the attached photos. Any help you can provide is greatly appreciated.
  13. Possible Turtle Humerus Bone

    Good afternoon, on a recent trip to Onslow Beach located in Jacksonville, NC I found several interesting items. I will list each separately. I have researched each item and will provide my thoughts on identification. Please feel free to correct me and or provide greater guidance as I am a true beginner. My second item- I believe this item is a turtle humerus bone. The size, shape and slight twist appear to be correct however, I am not very confident in my ID do the species and bone type. Any help you can provide is greatly appreciated.
  14. Possible Mammoth Tooth Fragment

    Good afternoon, on a recent trip to Onslow Beach located in Jacksonville, NC I found several interesting items. I will list each separately. I have researched each item and will provide my thoughts on identification. Please feel free to correct me and or provide greater guidance as I am a true beginner. My first item- I believe this item is a small fragment of mammoth tooth. The ridging appears correct however the fragment I’d very thin/small so not very confident in my ID. Any help you can provide is greatly appreciated.
  15. I finally got around to working on some Oreodont stuff. Last year I stopped by a friends house and bought a bunch of White River material. (my friend is going to stop by this May and bring me a bunch more). I did some work on some Oreodont stuff 20 some years ago and figured it would be fun to work on some more. I will call this skull #1. I realized at once that some of the skull was missing. Not good. I had already opened up this one and took off a bunch of loose rock and then decided to take a photo. You can see the earthquake crack in the rock and this thing was litterally falling apart all over the place. In this picture ive removed all the materail on the right of the crack including upper and lower jaw pieces. I was quite nervous but it was also fun and exciting. At this point ive use up almost an intire 2 oz bottle of super glue to hold the top part of this all together and when I turned it over, very carefully, lots of rock just came off with no prodding or nothing. The good thing was that the upper part held together and you can easily see the lower part of the lower jaws. At this point it was time for a wiskey. Here I glued back on the missing lower teeth. This thing was so fractured and falling apart the nothing really fit like it was supposed to but did the best that i could. Those extra two pieces on the left hand side also need to be glued back together and then both glued back onto the skull. Ok, bottom pieces glued back on and now set aside to cure. Tomorrow is gunna be a fun day. RB
  16. Wanted to Confirm this ID

    Hi all! I found this jaw section in Wyoming's White River fm. last year and was told it was likely from a dog (hesperocyon potentially). I wanted to confirm it with some of the people on the forum as there's not a lot left on it aside from part of a tooth, hopefully someone can affirm my hope that this piece actually belongs to a canid.
  17. Hyracodon?

    Hello TFF. This was brought to me today with no location info. It looks like Oligocene White River Group. Person who brought it in said it was collected by his grandparents who took trips to S. Dakota, etc. It is pretty "beat up". My first thought was Hyracodon from the White River Group. It's not Oreodont. Teeth are heavily eroded. The matrix is more reddish than anything I have collected in Nebraska, so maybe it's from S. Dakota? Thoughts? @Nimravis, @jpc (darn blurry pics. I even used a copy stand and timer...) Labial Lingual Occlusal (lingual side toward bottom)
  18. Gastropod?

    I found this "Gastropod" shell next to turritella shells and bivalve steinkerns. Do you think this is a gastropod? I know its too crummy of quality to be able to identify species. Let me know, thanks - John
  19. tiny shell ID?

    I found this in Washington state, Oligocene era. Its quite small but doesn't have the same horizontal striations of the other bivalves I found. It has vertical striations like a scallop (not that I suggest it is one)
  20. Genus of this shell?

    I found this one next to a bunch of turritellas. It looks like a scallops design. In Washington state. I took a picture next to a quarter but it didn't show up. Its around 3 inches across and 3 1/2 inches vertically.
  21. Marine Fossil ID?

    I found this is Western Washington state in an Oligocene Era sediment. I was thinking baculite but I have no idea. Someone please help me out. I split open a huge piece of mudstone and it popped out negative and positive (so the rock on the left is the imprint and the right is the positive). A piece broke off so I had to glue it back together
  22. Hi Everyone, I stumbled across this Oreodont (Leptauchenia) skull that I'm interested in. I don't see any obvious signs of restoration, but wanted to run it by you folks to get some second opinions. Does anyone see any signs of restoration that I may have missed? Thanks as always!
  23. This time let's have a look in Oligocene, one of my favorite. The Oligocene in this topic includes 2 different localities with slighlty different periods of time : Stampian (-33.9 - 28.1) and Chattian (-28.1 -23). Back in time, Europe experienced a distension at the origin of a great tear of the continental crust: the Western European rift, which produces an alignment of ditches of collapse from the North Sea to the Gulf of Lion. Lakes, with locally marine connections, occupy these ditches. The best example is the series of great Oligocene lakes of Provence. The climate is cooler and drier than in the previous era. As a result, the environment is modified: extinctions and replacements occur within wildlife. Following the refreshment, the flora has a sub-temperate character. It is thus dominated by the elements of the North European flora associated with warmer species, witnesses of earlier flora that survived the cooling. Provence at this time is covered with a series of lakes (depressions of Aix, Apt and Manosque). At the bottom of these silts were deposited on large thickness, forming limestone in thin sheets, fossilizing fauna and flora. We can discover fish, leaves, insects, and exceptionally were found crocodile, birds, bats, frogs ... The sea was close and sometimes corresponded with the lakes. The climate was tropical, from where an abundant flora composed of palms, pine trees … Finally, the Pyreno-Corsican-Sardinian massif gave way and left the sea rush into Provence, covering the lands that were previously emerged. The lakes give way to a warm and shallow sea, which I invite you to discover on the previous topic: Presentation of a Miocene outcrop form Souther France The rock is made of very thin layers which have to be opened carefully to discover the fossils. Some pictures will speak better:
  24. Oligocene Nibbler?

    I want to confirm that this bone fragment has the evidence of gnawing from a rodent or other mammal on it and if it's a common occurrence or not. Found this summer in the White River fm of eastern Wyoming. Here's both sides of the fossil-
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