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Found 278 results

  1. How to ID Fossils

    So I've been collecting fossils for a few years now, i have a bunch of ammonites, sea urchins, mollusks and plants but I have no idea where can i learn what exact species they are. I'm wandering if there is any books or sites to which you can point me so I can gather some knowledge . I know there is an ID section in this site but I want to be able to tell what species I have found, myself. By the way I'm from Europe.
  2. I have recently begun my journey into fossil prep, i'm using a dremel electric engraver as it seemed to be the best cheap tool. I have several ammonites from Yorkshire within nodules - these are very hard in the centre and consist of pyritised sediment. It is taking a very long time with the dremel using tungsten-carbide point, so just asking for any advice on how is best to try and get through these very hard bits. Cheers in advance!!
  3. Fossil News Summer 19 issue is available

    The Summer 2019 issue of Fossil News features the paleoart of Jimi Catanzaro, an article about late-Cretaceous pterosaurs in Cuba, more on that ammonite in amber you've been hearing so much about, an exclusive excerpt from Enrico Bonino’s new book about fossil medusozoans and how primitive algal mats helped preserve them, and a whole lot more! tinyurl.com/fnsubscribe
  4. Hi, Can anyone please help with the latest and safest info for beach access directions at Port Mulgrave, and Runswick Bay. I’ve never been to either and all info I find on line seems a bit outdated, confusing and causes concerns. My wife is coming with just to show slight interest and keep company. We are both mid 60’s and mobile amateurs. I’m concerned about ladder and rope access references and any related safety / risk aspects of getting onto the beach in the right place at the right time. Are there options for access to either location. Any directions or pointers would be warmly welcomed. This is something of a bucket list trip to quell a schoolboy interest, so I’d like to survive to remember it. Perfection would be to find a vertebrae, but very happy with a reasonable Ammonite. I’ve checked tide times, we are going early October with a high tide @ 09:00. Accommodation already booked nearby to allow 2 mornings on a beach. I’m assuming one location each day. All advise, comments and options would be warmly received. Regards, Bob
  5. Serbian ammonites ID

    Hi guys! Can anyone help me to identify these Ammonites? I am not good at identifying Ammonites so, if someone could help me out, It would be much appreciated! I didn't found them btw, my friend did. They we're found at Stara planina Mountain in Eastern Serbia. The location where they we're found is called Oreovica. I don't know anything about that location. This is all i have from the pictures. Hope someone will help out. Good luck! Darko
  6. Our fossil hunting holiday trip

    Natalie81 and I are back from our fossil hunting holiday. On the 20th of july we left for a long camping and fossil hunting week in the UK, we took the ferry in Calais to Dover, drove to Porthsmouth and the 2nd ferry to our 1st stop: 5 days on the Isle of wight. the 1st day on the Island, we prospected the beaches on the the south west of the isle where the Wealden cliffs could deliver some dinosaur remains.We had no luck this time. the 2nd day we went to the southern part of the Island where we could find some cenomanian ammonites in the chalk. This time we had better luck, and we found lots of them and even a few nautiluses. There was a sealion in the water not far from where we were prospecting, but since it was yawning a lot I don't think he was very interested in our activities Day 3 was a stop in Yaverland, here we found some hybodont remains and a possible pterosaur tooth ( we will know for sure after the prep ), in the afternoon we went a bit further to Whiteclif bay where we found a few echinoids. Day 4 Back to those Wealden cliffs in search for dinosaur material, again in vain, but we did se al those impresive Iguanodon foottracks at Hanover point. later on the day we tried to find the lobster bed near Atherfield, but only a few parts were accesible, but I found a nice big lobster in situ, it came out in a few pieces. I had super glue in my backpack, so I glued the parts back together and stuffed the fossil safely away in a box with soft paper. It is still in that box now, so I hope it wil still be ok when I start prepping it. Day 5: we had a meetup with a local colector to prospect the beaches on the north of the island, those were Oligocene deposits and we did find a lot of turtle fragments, a few croc scutes and even a few croc teeth Day 6: we had our ferry back to the mainland of the UK, from there we drove further to the jurassic coast. In the afternoon we went on the Beach between Dorset and Lyme Regis, but the beaches were full of tourists looking for fossils, so the finds were poor. Day 7: we visited Eype, and Golden cap, not far from Dorset, again verry few finds due to overprospected beaches, but we did find a decent ammonite. In the evening We visited the town of Lyme Regis and the birthplace of Mary Anning Day 8: this time e went east of Dorset, still very few fossils to be seen, but still multiple good belemnites , some of them still in the matrix. Day 9: time to pack the tent and drive back to Dover, we still had time before taking our ferry back to France so we did a quick stop in Folkestone. 2 hours of prospecting in the gault clay did deliver 2 decent ammonites and lots of ammonite fragments, belemnites and inoceramus shells. I didnt take a lot of pictures of the fossils we found yet, but we took a few ones in the field. more pictures will follow when we start unpacking and prepping the fossils from this week. Shipping to Dover: vieuw on the camping from Wight: of to the beach: no fossils to be seen Lots of beach to prospect: Still looking for bone in the shingle: sunset on Wight: to the cenomanian chalk: ammonites the Sealion: possible pterosaur tooth: footprints Oligoceene deposits: A vieuw on Wight before we leave: Dorset and Lyme regis: Ammonites everywhere Mary Anning:
  7. Cowboy Pass, Utah Ammonites

    Picture Heavy! On my first day in Millard County, I started out at the U-DIG quarry. I got lots of trilobites, but nothing too spectacular. (I'll share them in a separate post as there is quite a bit of prep work to do!) Honestly, I got a bit bored at the quarry. Sure, I enjoy digging fossils, but the challenge just isn't there. So after four hours, I decided to drive through Marjum Pass to Cowboy Pass. This is the view exiting Marjum Pass. (That is a truly epic drive on its own, but I didn't stop at any of the fossil sites in there!) Almost there! For those that don't know, distance and time behaves a bit strangely when solo in the desert. Finding road signs is even stranger. If you do decide to do a Millard County run, you'd better be able to use a topo map and a compass because you cant trust GPS maps and mobile phones have no service out here. I found that even the road atlas was untrustworthy. It took me three months of research to pinpoint the exact locations of the exposed Thaynes Formation areas of the Pass. Doing the homework paid off as I was able to find the "easy" site almost immediately. I'm not really into giving out exact locations, but I will say "The Book" is correct and accurate and that this photo shows the landmark referred to in an old Millard County rockhound guide. I know I could have just asked folks where they were, but a big part of this hobby for me is the satisfaction of confirming my research skills. One can easily drive to the "easy" site, but the other two (actually three...) require a pretty rugged hike. However, as you are about to see, it is well worth it. I found my first in the overburden some hack left behind. In fact, at the easy site I didn't even need to use any tools as whoever was there last ignored dozens of nice specimens! I will also add, I hope it wasn't someone from here...as I cleaned up all your %#!$%^&* trash for you. Three full bags of garbage and you left a virtually brand new gad pry under the pile of beer cans. Thanks. I needed a gad pry later! Anyway, Here are some of the specimens I collected from the various sites. Most of them need lots of prep work. Here's a few as they were found: I'll post more pictures at a later date as there is a lot of prep work to do on many of the specimens! So, in short, Cowboy Pass is well worth the excursion. Be prepared to do some real work, and study up on the site before you go. Also, don't be a jerk and leave a mess like the one I found...that is how public lands get closed to the public.
  8. Millard County Hunt

    I’m going to U-Dig, the surrounding area and Cowboy pass in Utah Late September. Let me know if you’d like to go. This is some of what I’ve found there but I have found so much more.
  9. Ammonites from northern France

    I bought a group of ammonites recently and they were described as coming from the Brittany coast of northern France. I don't know a lot about fossil sites along the French coast but after a little digging I came to the conclusion these probably came from sites nearer Normandy. I asked the seller for further information but sadly the person who collected them has passed away. I thought I'd post a few pics here in the hope that someone might be able narrow down the locality a little further. Thanks in advance for any help!
  10. Fish & fossils

    Although we didnt realy plan for a fossil field trip, we did go to Boulogne sur mer yesterday to visit the aquarium "Nausica". and since the chalk cliffs of cap blanc nez are only 20min away from there we did make a stop for a couple of hours at the beach at the cliffs. I can recomend a visit to the aquarium to enyone who visit's the are, it is definitely worth a visit, although the entrence fee is quite expensive. On our visit at the beach we were only equiped with a small hammer, but lots of boulders shore were already broken through the waves and still deliverd quite a lot of fossils. I also picked up a pice of chalk with a bone fragment in it. this was something I haven't found there before, we are still prepping this to see what we can make out of it: Visit at the aqurium: the vieuw at the top of the "Grand Blanc Nez", You can see the UK from there Vieuw on the coastline: ammonite in the boulders: the finds: the mystery bone:
  11. Some of my collection

    Hello gang, As promised this is where I will share specimens from my personal collection, my grandfather's collection, and the collection that was donated to the university I work for. The latter is interesting as it is literally boxes of rock and fossils, with no information and my university does not have a geology or paleontology department. I'll be updating it every so often. Enjoy! NOTE: Some of the donated items have old school "labels" on them. If you see initials or such that you recognize, please PM me, as I am doing my best to properly catalog them properly as part of my job!
  12. The first week of June I managed to break away from a European excursion with my wife to do a couple hours of collecting in northern Switzerland! We found a boatload of late-Jurassic (Birmenstorf-Member) ammonites and one nice echinoid which should be awesome with some prep! Funny part, on the drive back my wife mentions finding an ammonite that looked like there were nipples on it. Not until we get back to the apartment and start cleaning things off do I discover it was the echinoid she was talking about! *shes a rookie I could use some help with ID confirmation and IDs in general. Taramelliceras callicerum Ochetoceras canaliculatum Paracidaris blumenbachii Trimarginites arolicus (easy because of the grooves on the keel) These have fine ribs, are super thick relative to size but have goniatite type 'sutures' thoughts? (I dont think the far right one is equivalent, i have some other pictures of that one) Assumedly all of these are Perisphinctes, but I cannot tell the difference between all of those ribbed ones to save my life. They may need some prep to help determine Fatter, round keel. Glochiceras? There are quite a few that look like Trimarginites but have smooth keels. Thoughts? Are they just more weathered potentially hiding the grooves on the keel? These, from the paper most closely resemble Glochiceras crenatum but I dont feel like that specimen is closely enough related. I would think those spines along the keep would be easy to ID. One more, its a bid weathered but I figured someone might recognize it. Has some decent sized spines along the edge of the keel (arrows) Euaspidoceras oegir, maybe? Thanks for any help!
  13. Ammonites from Folkestone ID help

    Hi all, got some ammonites here that I desperately need help identifying! They are all from Folkestone, Kent from the Gault Clay of the lower cretaceous. There are also a few gastropods that I can't ID either. Thanks in advance for your help!
  14. Albian ammonites

    last weekend on our field trip where we usually search for cenomanian ammonites we also found a few phosphate ammonites on the beach that were washed out on the beach from the lower albian layers. most of them were only fragments or encrusted with phosphate, but I managed to prep few of them with very good results: the specimen on the bottom of the picture: Anahoplites planus Hoplites sp. Euhoplites ochetonus
  15. I just spend the evening cleaning and preping some of the cephalopods I found last weekend. those are all from the cenomanian at the French coast. A couple of nautiloids ( Eutrephoceras sp. ) A couple of turrelites and a Manteliceras sp.
  16. On Saturday, whilst - as I thought - recovering from a cold, I spent six hours in the blazing sunshine, hunting for ammonites in the inland exposures of the Beacon Limestone in Somerset, England. It involved a lot of physical exertion, especially for someone who was ill, with the result that it's now two days later and I'm as sick as a dog - and on my 40th birthday, too. If that's not depressing, tell me something that is. Whilst I'm feeling sorry for myself, at least I can take comfort in the fact that I made some pretty good finds. These are just the most photogenic finds, there were many others that were covered in rock and will need some prep. These need prep too, but you can at least get a good idea. Kettle for scale (ahem). Note the two belemnite phragmocones at the front. I was very pleased with this bit. I found it in-situ, and was chuffed when I turned it upside down and saw these two ammonites. The bottom one was preserved like that, with a corner missing. This one, like the previous example, has the characteristic matrix from this layer, which is absolutely packed with trace fossils. The best nautilus of the day. I found three in total.
  17. I am originally from Black Forest just north of the Springs, but I've never really gone fossil hunting in the area. I've certainly done my share of hunting in road cuts and public lands as a kid on roadtrips and camping with my family, but that was years ago and I don't remember really where any of those places were (aside from Dotsero; that'd be difficult to forget). Regardless, I'll be heading there late this summer in August to visit family for maybe a week or week and a half. Reading strat columns and geologic maps is no problem; I have a pretty good idea of the rocks that could outcrop on the front range and the Denver-Julesberg Basin. I just don't know where to look exactly for fossils. Anyone know of some sites on public land in the region to do some hunting? I have plans for some rockhounding in the Pikes Peak Batholith but I'd be thrilled to have a fossil site or two to visit as well. I'd love to find some plant fossils or ammonites/other marine inverts. But I'm not picky about type or age. I'm really just starting to collect, so I'm not after anything in particular. I'm willing to drive a couple hours to somewhere. Also northern Colorado closer to Fort Collins into southeast Wyoming would be great, if anyone knows of something there. I live in Laramie, so sites near there are welcome, too.
  18. From the album Cretaceous

    Didymoceras binodosum Partial Inner Whorl from Juvenile Turrilite Ammonite Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Matawan Group Big Brook Marlboro, N.J.
  19. Ammonite hunt in Northern France

    We are back from a very windy fieldtrip to Cap blanc Nez in France. The wind covered a lot of the rocks with sand and sea foam ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_foam ) which made fossil hunting rather difficult. We were helped by a local collector in the morning who guided us through the Turonian deposits of this site where we rarely colect, here we got 2 big ammonites. One of them was a Mamites nodosoides, this species as been on my wishlist for a while, so I am very happy with it In the afternoon we prospected the Cenomanian side. her we found the usual Mantelliceras and Scloenbachia ammonites. The prospecting site: ( we did see the coast of the UK on the other side of the channel ) Some of the ammonites we found: The Mammites: pictures of the prepped specimens will follow during the next week.
  20. I am back from my trip to morocco. It is a 14 days trip and I got 4 days for fossil hunting. It was so imagine, fossils are everywhere and even though I won't be able to dig, I still get plenty to bring home. Since my guide doesn't speak good English, I am not be able to ask him must so I need help to identify the fossil. On the first day, my guide took me to a place near Erfoud to search for dinosaur teeth. It is very close to the highway. We found a well that the local people dig to get Spinosaur teeth and bone. My husband went down to one but couldn't find anything because the well is new and it is not deep enough. We didn't want to try the deeper one so we decide to bought some spinosaur teeth from the local people there. This tooth is a little over 4.5 inches and I think there are some prepare but I can't tell how much. I also bought 3 smaller teeth and was giving the broken one which I don't know what it is.
  21. A new ammonite clock.

    From the album Jurassic stuff uk

    stained glass clock with ammonites.
  22. Spent two afternoons in the workshop prepping some ammonites from the Beacon Limestone, a Toarcian deposit exposed in many places around Somerset, UK. Had a fair few disappointments, including several very large ammonites (for this area - about 8 inches) which had no centres. That's common for ammonites from this location, which is a pain because it often takes a lot of prep through sticky, tough rock before you can tell whether or not there's a centre. But there were some nice ones. I had cautiously high hopes for this large harpoceras... Which turned out justified, because this is one of the best examples of this species that I've found. The inner whorls are typically covered in quite sticky rock, and the surviving calcite steinkerns are often a little wibbly-wobbly in their preservation. I was pleased that this one retains the body chamber (or most of it). This one didn't turn out as well as I'd hoped, so I stopped short of making it perfect. It's OK. Not sure what species this is, but I have found a number with this attractive marbled surface. Two rare ammonites from this location. Phylloceras is a deep water ammonite, but these are shallow sea deposits, so they'd have to drift in. Body chambers are typically missing and they are often otherwise incomplete. I don't know what species this is. But it looks a bit unusual. Let me know if you have any ideas!
  23. I was overwhelmed with prep immediately after the 2011 trip my wife and I took to Europe, so I put down some of the more involved prep work until now. Initially I prepped only the flashiest stuff we found. Happy to be all caught up. Prep involved air scribe, dolomite microblast, and coating with a mixture of beeswax and turpentine. Hope you find them as appealing as we do. First, Drügendorf, Germany.
  24. This is another piece discovered at an estate sale, which of course means I do not have the info such as location it was found, etc. It has some amazing detail, spiny legs? but it's so squished into the matrix I have no idea what it could be. Hope to receive more info. The piece is approx. 6 x 4"
  25. Hello all, Currently digging through boxes I haven't looked through for several years and came across these two ammonites. I thought they were Kosmoceras grossourvrei but they seem to be too coarsely ribbed, Kosmoceras pollucinum maybe? Any help or advice with this would be greatly appreciated. Found in the Lower Oxford Clay of Kings dyke, Cambridgeshire. Callovian stage. Cheers, Jacob.
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