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  1. Hello everyone, happy to have discovered this forum ! I'm french and was in Grand canyon for Holliday's, a week ago and during a hike I found this grey stone among all the red ones. It looks like a tooth by its form and the surface is cracked as old ivory. It is very different from all other stones I saw on the place. Could you help me to identify it with your experienced eyes ? Thank you in advance and have a nice day!
  2. ThePhysicist

    Juvenile great white shark tooth

    From the album: Sharks

    Great whites didn't start out "great." As young, small animals, they had narrower teeth suited for grasping slippery fish. As they age, the teeth broaden as their diet transitions to marine mammals. This small tooth measures ~ 1" on the slant and comes from the Early Pliocene of the Pisco formation in southern Peru. This is about as old as great white teeth get, they evolved from C. hubbelli near the start of the Pliocene (~ 5.3 Ma). Fossils are now illegal to export from Peru, this one was collected prior to 1990 under a Peruvian government permit. As ethical collectors, please do
  3. ThePhysicist

    South American great whites

    From the album: Sharks

    These white sharks come from the deserts of Chile (left) and Peru (right).
  4. ThePhysicist

    Peruvian great white

    From the album: Sharks

    Some rare colors on this tooth! While it looks like Bone Valley, this great white actually comes from southern Peru (Pisco formation, Early Pliocene). This is about as old as GW teeth get - the modern species evolved from C. hubbelli around the Early Pliocene (~ 5 million years ago). Fossils are now illegal to export from Peru, this one was collected prior to 1990 under a Peruvian government permit. As ethical collectors, please do your due diligence to verify any Peruvian fossils you're interested in were exported prior to the ban. I respect any country's decision to protect their natural
  5. ThePhysicist

    Carcharodon hubbelli

    From the album: Sharks

    White sharks used to have smooth-edged teeth. They eventually evolved serrations as their diets transitioned to marine mammals from fish. This shark was a transitional form between the smooth-edged predecessors and the modern fully-serrated great white. The serrations on this tooth are not worn-down. C. hubbelli serrations are naturally finer, typically decrease in size towards the tip, and are oriented towards the tip. This tooth is from the desert of northern Chile. Fossils from Chile are now illegal to export, so as an ethical collector you need to make sure that any Chilean fos
  6. ThePhysicist

    Great white shark tooth

    From the album: Sharks

    One of the most coveted teeth due to the great white's popularity. Being one of my favorite animals, I knew I had to get a nice one eventually. This one in particular is special. Besides being in superb condition, this tooth has a bite mark on the root: three parallel grooves on the labial side of the root gouged by serrations. Bite marks on teeth are uncommon, and a neat feature on this already sweet tooth. This tooth is from the desert of northern Chile. Fossils from Chile are now illegal to export, so as an ethical collector you need to make sure that any Chilean f
  7. ThePhysicist

    Carcharodon hastalis

    From the album: Sharks

    For a while these teeth were called "makos," but we now know these teeth belonged to old white sharks, sharks that were the predecessors of the modern great white.
  8. I bought this beauty last month and it finally arrived this morning. This should be the best preserved shark tooth among all the specimens I have ever touched. It’s 2.17 inches long and it’s also has a little bit pathology to both side of the edge.
  9. Hi there everyone! I've recently been acquiring different fossils to add to my collection and I came across a listing for a carcharodontosaurus tooth that really interested me. Below are a few photos of the listing advertising the carcharodontasaurus tooth. The sellers themselves are very reputable and I am in no way questioning their validity as I'm sure the tooth is a real fossil. Instead, I was wondering if anyone would be able to help me positively identify the fossil as a carcharodontosaurus tooth as I know many different teeth and fossils come from the Kem Kem Beds in Morocco. The tooth
  10. Hi Guys, I need your help, I was sifting for Shark teeth in Glades County, FL. And came across this specimen buried in sand/under water. I need first and foremost help on its preservation. Also if you guys could identify it would be great. Looks like a shoulder blade of a quadruped but I’m lost on what exactly it is and how old it might be. Thank you,
  11. Cione, A.L. and Bonomo, M., 2003. Great white shark teeth used as pendants and possible tools by early‐middle Holocene terrestrial mammal hunter‐gatherers in the Eastern Pampas (Southern South America). International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, 13(4), pp.222-231. PDF file from Researchgate More PDF of papers PDF file from Academia.edu Yours, Paul H.
  12. Taxonomic debate over extinct lamniformes remains a big thing, but I've noticed that it seems like there hasn't been any studies that use modern phylogenetic techniques (i.e. maximum parsimony) to resolve issues with extinct taxa (i.e. Carcharodon, Isurus, Macrorhizodus, Otodus). Is there a reason for this absence, or perhaps I simply have not come across one that already exists? I suppose it's possible that dental characteristics alone as character codes for a phylogenetic matrix may not be viable...
  13. I've been going through my shark tooth collection recently trying to refine my ids. This one here has me somewhat stumped. I had identified it as Carcharhinus priscus, but I'm not at all sure any more and am now starting to wonder if it may be a chub or great white. The first photo, which I think is the labial view, seems to fit, but what I believe to be the lingual view (2nd photo) has me confused. The tooth is from the southern German Miocene Burdigalian. Slant length 15mm. Any advice here would be appreciated.
  14. Jello5700

    Shark tooth ID

    Is this a Great White Shark tooth? Found this in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, USA about 15 years ago and just refound it while cleaning out a desk. It is about 1.25 inches (31.75mm) long and curves back from base to tip with serrations along the edge. Thanks!
  15. Free Access pdf link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/08912963.2020.1861608?needAccess=true Shimada, K., Bonnan, M. F., Becker, M. A., Griffiths, M. L. (2021). Ontogenetic growth pattern of the extinct megatooth shark Otodus megalodon—implications for its reproductive biology, development, and life expectancy. Historical Biology. Abstract: The extinct megatooth shark, Otodus megalodon (Lamniformes: Otodontidae), is known primarily from its gigantic teeth in the late Neogene marine fossil record. It is known to reach at least 14.1‒15.3 m in length, but its r
  16. Sameih

    Fossil fossils

    Hi everybody. I found this Fossil fossils and I don't know anything about can you please let me know what this Fossil fossils . Thank you .
  17. I have seen several names for megalodon all with a different genus, which is correct? Edit: Another question, is cretalamna appendiculata the ancestor of otodus obliquis? Is there anything in between those if they are related? Do we know megalodon ancestry past C. appendiculata if it is directly related to O. Obliquis?
  18. Hey everyone, Thinking about purchasing this Megalodon tooth here, but want to make sure it's authentic first! Seller says it has no restoration and was found in Southeast US. It's 5.697" long. What do you think? Thanks in advance!
  19. Colvin, G., 2011, The Presence, Source and Use of Fossil Shark Teeth from Ohio Archaeological Sites. Ohio Archaeologist 61, no. 4, pp. 26-46. https://kb.osu.edu/handle/1811/56970 https://www.academia.edu/9539090/The_Presence_Source_and_Use_of_Fossil_Shark_Teeth_from_Ohio_Archaeological_Sites Colvin, G., 2014. Shark Teeth from Ohio Archaeological Sites: An Update Based on Newly Discovered Teeth. Ohio Archaeologist 64, no. 4, pp. 55-60. https://www.academia.edu/11497086/Shark_Teeth_from_Ohio_Archaeological_Sites_An_Update_Based_on_Newly_Discovere
  20. Found several of these while digging a hole for the swimming pool in our house. It was very surprising as I found hundred of them. Can anyone tell it is century old. I took a video of my discovery too.
  21. Ludwigia

    Carcharodon hastalis

    From the album: Pisces

    Whatever it's called, Carcharodon, Cosmopoltidus or Isurus, it has a slant length of 25mm. Burdigalian OMM Early Miocene From Billafingen, Germany
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