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  1. isurus90064

    Extraordinary Common Teeth

    Hey guys, I've been off the radar for awhile .. work you know .. been working on Siggraph for those of you who are familiar with software development. Just wanted to start a new topic here .. This one is right at 3.00" - 7.62cm C. carcharias Bahia Inglesa Formation South of Caldera Provincia Copiapo III Regio de Atacama Chile
  2. Apologies for the dramatic title. I thought it sounded cool and stuck with it even though 90 + 80 + 80 is only 250 . Anyways... This past 30 days, I decided to make it a point to check out some new spots. I won't be living in Austin soon, so I thought it would be good to branch out and scout some new locations with potential. I've found lots of creek-worn mosasaur bits and pieces over the past year. I'm ready to find things in situ, and, one day, something articulated. It's a tall order, I know, but I feel like it's the next step and really the ultimate goal I've always had. So, th
  3. Egrigg

    Texas shark tooth ID

    I cannot for the life of me figure out what this tooth is. When I first found it I was sure it was Cretoxyrhina but with further inspection I doubt that’s the case. Does anyone have a clue what shark this mysterious tooth belongs to? (Found in alluvium/ozan)
  4. It's been over a month now since @Jared C and I found the Eagle Ford Xiphactinus. In the weeks that followed our discovery I was able to get in touch with the right people at Baylor University where I go to school and start to organize a retrieval project. Unfortunately I haven't been able to make it back to the site since then as all involved will have to wait for the wheels of bureaucracy to turn enough for us to have the proper permission necessary to return. So I was left with a problem: my first visit to the Eagle Ford turned out so well that I wanted nothing more than to go back, but I c
  5. fossilsonwheels

    Cretoxyrhina ???

    .7” tooth, Blue Hill Member, Carlile Shale, Jewell Co Kansas. I am not super familiar with the Carlile Shale fauna and I think this is a Cretoxyrhina but I’m not 100% sure I’m correct so I thought I seek other opinions.
  6. ThePhysicist

    Cretaceous sharks

    From the album: Sharks

    Just a handful of Cretaceous species, most from North Texas. The sea that bisected North America ~85 million years ago played host to a diverse and burgeoning ecosystem that supported many species of sharks. It was likely due to specialization that allowed these sharks to all live in the same place and time.
  7. I've recently become very interested in the sharks of the Cretaceous. The largest of all sharks during this time period was supposedly Cretoxyrhina mantelli, or the "Ginsu Shark". It likely would've highly resembled the modern Great White. I looked up a few images of their teeth, but I was wondering if anyone who hunts the Cretaceous here on the forum has any of their own? If so, I'd love to see them! Hoppe hunting!
  8. ThePhysicist

    Cretoxyrhina tooth (3)

    From the album: Sharks

    A gorgeous tooth from one of my favorite sharks! The enamel isn't polished - the chalk preserves its shine extremely well - it's as shiny as when it fell out of the animal's mouth!
  9. ThePhysicist

    Cretoxyrhina tooth (2)

    From the album: Sharks

    A beautiful tooth from one of my favorite sharks. This one is extra special because of the self-inflicted bite mark - a gash seen on the left in lingual view. Apparently their bite was strong enough to cut their own teeth!
  10. ThePhysicist

    Cretoxyrhina tooth

    From the album: Sharks

    One of my favorites - the "ginsu" shark. This one was found at the DFW airport in the 80's.
  11. Chase_E

    Cretoxyrhina vraconensis

    From the album: Cenomanian Shark Teeth and other Marine Fauna, Ryazan Oblast, Russia

    Cretoxyrhina vraconensis. I believe this is a lower anterior, but I could be mistaken.
  12. Hi, Recently, I had the good fortune to acquire this set of Cretoxyrhina (vraconensis) teeth from the Britton Fm., Texas. I have a detailed account of it’s discovery which describes almost all of these teeth being found together in an area about 18” x18”, with a few stragglers found just outside the main pile of teeth. It’s not complete, but It looks like most of the positions are represented. Some of the larger anteriors were not recovered and I suspect at least one or two positions are missing. I have arranged these teeth into positions that look close to me, but ther
  13. bthemoose

    Texas Cretaceous shark teeth

    I have here two shark teeth from the Cretaceous of Texas that I'm hoping to ID. #1: Dwardius ?woodwardi? The first tooth below is from Dallas, TX, from a buffer zone between the Eagle Ford and Woodbine formations (i.e., late Cretaceous, ~90-96 mya). I previously posted this tooth in the mailbox score thread and the @ThePhysicist tentatively IDed it as Dwardius (woodwardi?) but recommended posting it in the ID forum. I'm finally getting around to doing that! This tooth measures 25 mm on the slant.
  14. ThePhysicist

    A Physicist's Collection

    While my prime focus is essentially learning how to accurately describe Nature in the precise language of mathematics, I've always been intrigued by natural history - it's actually what started me on the path to physics. The sort of interrogation that paleontology practices provoked me to think and question even further, down to the fundamental science which makes it all work. Collecting fossils has brought a large amount of enjoyment to my life, and is often a welcome distraction from what can sometimes be straining work. The knowledge that I accumulate along the way is also part
  15. ThePhysicist

    Cretoxyrhina mantelli (6)

    From the album: Sharks

    Nearly flawless lateral "ginsu" from the Smoky Hill Chalk of Kansas, USA.
  16. Jurassicz1

    Cretoxyrhina mantelli? Sweden

    Found ths shark tooth in Ignaberga Sweden. Its around 1 cm big. Some info about this locality. Its upper Cretaceous deposits where Cretoxyrhina can be found.
  17. I need a few more Cretoxyrhina for the display I’m trying to finish. I really do not want to spend money so I’m trying a trade. I recently got some rare Kem Kem Lamniformes teeth and can offer up a Leptostyrax. It is the largest of those I got at 2.6 cm. There is some matrix on the root but the tooth is in pretty good shape. I would consider teeth from any location but my preference would be a location I don’t have such as New Mexico or Alabama. PM me if you’re interested
  18. ThePhysicist

    Cretoxyrhina Tooth

    Identification: ginsu teeth have broad lingual dental bands, rounded root lobes, a strong lingual protuberance in the roots of anterior teeth, smooth crown faces, and no nutrient groove. Notes: Has damage on the lingual side, perhaps a self-inflicted gash as the tooth fell out of the mouth. Otherwise, a perfect tooth with a very sharp point.
  19. I'm a newbie who lives in the Austin area with a lot of passion for ancient life, but I'm having trouble making a decisive start with with my searches. I have a particular interest in large western interior seaway predators, most notably xiphactinus, but also the mosasaurs and sharks that lived in the area as well. Finding a vertebrae, of perhaps even teeth from these groups would be absolutely wonderful, but of the few creeks in the Austin area I've scouted, I've been able to turn up nothing besides gastropods. This is still despite heavily studying the sometimes confusing Texas geological ma
  20. KansasFossilHunter

    $60 IKEA case with nice Kansas fossils

    Earlier this year I bought this case from IKEA for about $60. Then I added some LED lights and a few nice fossils. Check it out: Top row is basically the "ferocious fish" level Next down is the Tylosaurus / platycarpine mosasaur level Then the Cretoxyrhina level And a Pteranodon wing cast I made Overview of the four layers: Top level: Xiphactinus and Protosphraena. Note embedded tooth on r. Xip vertebra.
  21. Hi all. I have just joined the forum so sorry if I get anything wrong! This fossil is a (I think) Cretoxyrhina shark tooth embedded in a giant ammonite. I found this on Hunstanton cliffs and it is from the Cretaceous deposit of the ferriby chalk formation. I have heard that these kinds of fossil records about prehistoric shark's diets were reasonably rare and can be of scientific interest. I was going to contact the natural history museum of Oxford if it is but couldn't find out how to so I decided to come to you guys first. The tooth is 1cm in length and the ammonite is 38 cm (15 inches).
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