Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'dimetrodon'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • blogs_blog_99
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101
  • Trip Reports
  • Glendive Montana dinosaur bone Hell’s Creek
  • Ladonia Texas Fossil Park

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

  1. Hi there everyone! I came across a listing for a “dimetrodon claw” and would really appreciate it if y’all could give it a look and tell me what y’all think. The majority of my knowledge and collection mostly consists of specimens from the Hell Creek formation so I’m not too knowledgeable when it comes to permian age fossils, though I’d love to expand my horizons and learn about everything I can. The specimen is said to be a dimetrodon claw from the Ryan Formation, Waurika Oklahoma. I’ve gone ahead and contacted the seller for any more information about the specimen so
  2. During the Summer, I had the fortune of driving near Seymour, TX and thus the opportunity to pay a visit to the WMNH. The WMNH is a small but unique museum in Northern Texas, specializing in the Early Permian fauna that lived nearby ~ 290 million years ago in the famous Texas "red beds." The land around Seymour was once an equatorial bayou, humid and inundated with rivers and lakes. In the rivers were lungfish like those that live today, various ray-finned fishes, and cartilaginous fish like the Xenacanth "sharks." Amphibians like Eryops, Seymouria, and Diplocaulus also spent much
  3. Hello I am planning a trip to Oklahoma and wondered if anyone knew were to fossil hunt in the waurika area? Thanks
  4. ThePhysicist

    Dimetrodon claw

    From the album: Permian

    Just the end of a Dimetrodon terminal phalange (claw). It could be an undescribed synapsid, but it seems to fit the morphology of a small Dimetrodon claw well (namely the sharp "v"-shaped cross section of the flexor tubercle). Length: 4 mm ^ Maddin & Reisz (2007)
  5. carch_23

    Dimetrodon vert?

    Hey guys, just saw this dimetrodon vertebrae for sale. Not really familiar with reptilian material and tried checking in the forum for similar threads for reference but cant seem to find one I could use. Also tried looking fkr similar ones for sale online but just not really familiar with reptilian material to positively ID mine. Was hoping if you guys may be able to help me with this one though and if it was possible to ID them to a species level? Cheers! PS. Currently asking for more specific locality but atm, all I have is that it is from Texas. Age Location
  6. ThePhysicist

    A Physicist's Collection

    While my prime focus is essentially learning how to accurately describe Nature in the precise language of mathematics, I've always been intrigued by natural history - it's actually what started me on the path to physics. The sort of interrogation that paleontology practices provoked me to think and question even further, down to the fundamental science which makes it all work. Collecting fossils has brought a large amount of enjoyment to my life, and is often a welcome distraction from what can sometimes be straining work. The knowledge that I accumulate along the way is also part
  7. I had the pleasure of arranging a special fossil hunt to the Red Beds of Texas - a famous Permian site that was originally described by Copes in 1870's and later by Romer. It's an old quarry on private land that we were able to take a group of 10 to hunt on. And I was corrected by our guide that it was really not so much a "hunt" as a "collect" because the fossils were literally EVERYWHERE! You could sit in a 10 foot radius circle and be picking up vertebrate material all day long! We collected for about 5 hours and everyone came away with some fabulous fossils. Lots of amphibian skull pieces
  8. ThePhysicist

    Dimetrodon Tooth

    Identification: This tooth was found in processed microfossil matrix from Waurika, OK, USA. Reptile remains in general are very uncommon, so if you think you've found many pieces of Dimetrodon teeth, you're likely mistaking many Orthacanth shark cusps. Orthacanth shark enamel is smooth, and the serrations are quite prominent compared to those on Dimetrodon which are finer. Dimetrodon enamel is not smooth, as seen on this one. Dimetrodon crowns are also broader. Shark cusps broken at the foot of the crown also flare out, where reptile teeth do not. Were this crown complete, you would also not
  9. Le Quoc

    Pelycosaur material need help

    I got these material from one seller. The information that I have is these all come from Oklahoma, USA. I have separate and glue some. I put them in 2 group that which have spike and which doesn’t have. It very pleasure that you could help me to ID them! Thanks! First group Second group
  10. ThePhysicist

    cf. Dimetrodon grandis

    From the album: Permian

    Now how can this crumb of a tooth be attributed to Dimetrodon?? First, it's serrated. It could be shark? The enamel is not smooth (not very visible in this image, a little at the bottom), so no (additionally, the serration shape is different from those of Orthacanth sharks). That narrows it down to serrated Synapsids. It turns out that very few animals at this time and location had "true" serrations, not just enamel serrations, but bumps in the dentine beneath the enamel. The enamel on this piece happens to still be clear, allowing one to see the globular dentine underneath! From B
  11. ThePhysicist

    Dimetrodon tooth

    From the album: Permian

    Dimetrodon sp. Wellington/Ryan Fm., Waurika, OK, USA Post-canine/posterior tooth This tooth is likely from D. limbatus, given the locality and presence of serrations: https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms4269 The same paper also rules out other serrated Sphenacodonts by the enamel ornamentation. Its smaller size could indicate that it's from a juvenile. It differs from the comparatively abundant broken Orthacanth shark tooth cusps in the microfossil matrix (what most people are likely to confuse with): the enamel texture is not smooth, the c
  12. ThePhysicist

    Hatchling Dimetrodon Claw?

    Hi y'all. Found this in some Permian micromatrix from Waurika, OK. There's no way I'm this lucky, but is this a very tiny Dimetrodon claw? I've tried to get access to this paper, but still waiting to see if the authors will send the text. I'm fairly confident it's at least sphenacodontid, based on pictures I've seen on the forum. It's about 3 mm in length. @dinodigger@jdp
  13. ThePhysicist

    Dimetrodon spine

    From the album: Permian

    Spine section from Dimetrodon sp. (limbatus?).
  14. dinodigger

    Dimetrodon vertebra

    It's been a long time since I shared some finds- this is a really nice Dimetrodon caudal (tail) vertebra from a medium size ddon. The short, blade-like neural spine is the tell for position. Newest project for us is prepping a 12 foot by 6 foot block containing remains of at least 6 Dimetrodons. Hoping to get it into the lab by April... will start posting photos soon. Best, Chris
  15. paleo.nath

    Dimetrodon tooth?

    I’ve just found this tooth in some Permian micro matrix from the Wellington formation, it is serrated and around a centimeter long. I’m thinking It’s dimetrodon or some sort of other basal synapsid
  16. PrehistoricWonders

    Dimetrodon? Claw?

    Hi, I’m considering buying this “dimetrodon claw” and was wondering if it is really a dimetrodon claw. It was found in waurika, Oklahoma, Ryan formation and is from the Permian. I’m not sure how big it is but it looks pretty small. TIA
  17. FF7_Yuffie

    Dimetrodon tooth?

    At 8mm, it seems small to me. Any thoughts? From the Texas Red Beds.
  18. dinodigger

    Dimetrodon's yay!!!

    Dimetrodon teeth have come up lately and I havent posted in a long time. This specimen is grandis species from the Arroyo formation. Older species are smaller and have interesting fluting, something we don't typically see in the later, more advanced guys who also have larger, more robust teeth with coarser serrations.
  19. dinodigger

    Dimetrodon Tibia

    Here is a beautiful young Dimetrodon tibia- wonderful thick permian pond clay helps preserve wonderfully. Short back legs much like a horned toad. Watch a horn toad run and you will get the idea of how these guys ran. Fast, but short, bursts of speed for surprise attack.
  20. I’ve been trying to research and go through previous posts all morning, but I still need help. Can this be confirmed as a Dimetrodon tooth or just as Sphenacodontidae? The seller states that it’s from the Ryan formation and found near Waurika, Oklahoma. It appears to be around 1/4 inch long. I know the photos aren’t the best, but all of the sellers photos are pretty terrible. I can definitely see serrations on the tooth. If anyone can help shed some light on this for me I would appreciate it. I know @Bobby Rico has a slight obsession with Dimetrodons, so maybe he can weigh in.
  21. Ok I also think it is time for us to see more of the members collections . So without further ado show us your Sphenacodontidae collection . is an extinct family of small to large, advanced, carnivorous, Late Pennsylvanian to middle Permian pelycosaurs. Sphenacodontid fossils are so far known only from North America and Europe and have one of the most ironic creature ever to have lived in there ranks, Dimetrodon. And a claw from the same location.
  22. Listing for dimetrodon manus track from el pueblo, NM. Five claw tip impressions but these are the only pics provided. Any thoughts?
  23. Still_human

    2 dimetrodon vertebrae & basioccipital

    From the album: Permian era fossils

    Basioccipital about .5" large vertebra about 3" small vertebra about 1.5" *more info to be posted
  24. BigJim2500

    Permian Reptile Vertebra ID

    Hi, looking for some thoughts on identification of a fossil I bought a while ago. This is a fairly well preserved vertebra from an early reptile of some kind. Unfortunately I lost the original label for it so all I can say is that it’s from 300-250 mya, and from a formation in Oklahoma or Texas. I’m not very experienced with Permian stuff, so I’m not sure where to begin. Thanks for any help!
×
×
  • Create New...